Question Alienware m17 R3, can the I7 10750H be delidded and have Thermal Grizzly Liquid Metal applied?

Nov 21, 2020
7
0
10
0
Hello, I'm writing to see if anyone knows to start off with, if you can delid the I7 10750H in an Alienware laptop. I've seen multiple delid kits sold, but none list compatability with my cpu specifically. Secondly, is liquid metal safe with this cpu if so? I wasn't sure on the ihs material.

Total system specs: Alienware m17 R3, 4k 60hz display, I7 10750H cpu, rtx 2070 super gpu, 16gb ram, 1tb raid 0 ssd setup.

Why do I want to use liquid metal over thermal paste? Well I've already used throttlestop to apply a -145mv undervolt to my laptop, it's on max fan mode, and it's on a cool lifted up pad all to try to lower temps. My cpu is still spiking upwards of 90-100, even reached 104C. I've benchmarked (heaven, 3d mark), and tested temps with ARK, and Mortal Kombat 11. Temps and statistics viewed via HW Monitor pro, cpuz, and alienwarecc.
 

lga1156_ftw

Notable
Feb 25, 2020
1,211
132
1,190
154
its soldered on the motherboard and already without IHS, no need to delidd :
View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Rwyz0A0VT4c


You can always add liquid metal some gains over the stock thermal paste , this will remove warranty and you need to be really careful its conductive.
Theres small components very close to the cpu die, here is more info how to insulate : http://forum.notebookreview.com/threads/liquid-metal-and-33-tape.829130/

However before doing all that i suggest just getting laptop cooling pad like kootek https://www.amazon.com/Kootek-Laptop-Cooling-Cooler-Adjustable/dp/B01469DJLM
I used many of these and they work best for price/value, if few of the fans die just get another its so cheap.


Have you already replaced the thermal paste with good non conductive one? If not then get "GC gelid extreme" or Noctua NT-H1 non conductive paste and some isoprophyl alcohol 90%+ , then clean the heatsink and cpu die well with coffee filters dipped into alcohol until shiny (careful near the small components) after its very clean apply plenty of new paste , look for guides how much on youtube. Tighten screws slowly from opposite directions until its tight, but dont overdo it. You dont need to insulate anything this method since its not conductive paste
 
Nov 21, 2020
7
0
10
0
its soldered on the motherboard and already without IHS, no need to delidd :
View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Rwyz0A0VT4c


You can always add liquid metal some gains over the stock thermal paste , this will remove warranty and you need to be really careful its conductive.
Theres small components very close to the cpu die, here is more info how to insulate : http://forum.notebookreview.com/threads/liquid-metal-and-33-tape.829130/

However before doing all that i suggest just getting laptop cooling pad like kootek https://www.amazon.com/Kootek-Laptop-Cooling-Cooler-Adjustable/dp/B01469DJLM
I used many of these and they work best for price/value, if few of the fans die just get another its so cheap.


Have you already replaced the thermal paste with good non conductive one? If not then get "GC gelid extreme" or Noctua NT-H1 non conductive paste and some isoprophyl alcohol 90%+ , then clean the heatsink and cpu die well with coffee filters dipped into alcohol until shiny (careful near the small components) after its very clean apply plenty of new paste , look for guides how much on youtube. Tighten screws slowly from opposite directions until its tight, but dont overdo it. You dont need to insulate anything this method since its not conductive paste
That's a very helpful reply. I didn't know the cpu was soldered on. Should've known being a non Area 51m laptop though. But I see now after watching the video, the heatsink has copper up against the die. I heard online that liquid metal has some nasty interactions with aluminum, and a slightly bad reaction to copper over time. I haven't touched the stock paste yet since I figured if I'm going to disassemble it and mess with the cpu, might as well go for liquid metal since I'm already between 90-100 degrees without having anything unrealistically demanding running. I already have that cooling pad exacltly, 5 fans, blue led version. Still super high temps. I know the 10 series runs hot supposedly, but these temps are insane. 60+ degrees at idle is crazy.

I might still consider the liquid metal route, but at least you've given me some things to consider. Thank you.
 

lga1156_ftw

Notable
Feb 25, 2020
1,211
132
1,190
154
Remember this will happen when you use liquid metal with laptop heatsink :
View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ejPQmtADOaE

You need to basically reapply it every year minimum, sometimes even more often after it "wears" out. And this is what it looks like.

I would myself first to clean it very well with isoprohyl alcohol both heatsink and cpu die, then apply "Gelid GC extreme" that has best thermals out of the non conductive ones.

Then after that follow this guide for undervolting your gpu / cpu :
View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4HBXOfHGnY0


If you still are not satisfied with the results changing to liquid metal from gc gelid extreme is not that big of a change and it will not remove all of the thermal throttling , next step i would open up the laptop and yes change paste to liquid metal but also "thermal" mode the case and add additional heatsinks and also thermal pads to transfer heat better from the motherboard components to front/back case. This will take time and someone has probably already done it look it up for your model.

There might be better heatsinks/fans available for this model ( maybe same model with i9? ) and if there is and it fits the case with maybe slight modding its worth.
 

arif1752002m4a1

Respectable
May 16, 2018
740
19
2,565
108
That's a very helpful reply. I didn't know the cpu was soldered on. Should've known being a non Area 51m laptop though. But I see now after watching the video, the heatsink has copper up against the die. I heard online that liquid metal has some nasty interactions with aluminum, and a slightly bad reaction to copper over time. I haven't touched the stock paste yet since I figured if I'm going to disassemble it and mess with the cpu, might as well go for liquid metal since I'm already between 90-100 degrees without having anything unrealistically demanding running. I already have that cooling pad exacltly, 5 fans, blue led version. Still super high temps. I know the 10 series runs hot supposedly, but these temps are insane. 60+ degrees at idle is crazy.

I might still consider the liquid metal route, but at least you've given me some things to consider. Thank you.
I just suggest you to use Normal thermal paste.. you should not use Liquid metal.. as they are really dangerous for Electronics.. and if you spill.. you will never able to clean it from board... And liquid metal can corrode and eat up your Aluminium, steel retention arm for your Copper heatpipe.. (if an drop on liquid metal fall on metal plate)

Any liquid metal weather it is gallium, indium or mercury based.. that can corrode your metals.. so I don't recommend it..

And I think just by applying new thermal paste, your CPU will settle down to 80°C at max load.. (I never used that Laptop but as my experience says that will work )
 

ASK THE COMMUNITY

TRENDING THREADS