Question All connected computers to network work fine, expect mine.

Feb 6, 2020
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Hey, so I've been having this problem for the past month or so with my internet. There's no indicator or sign that it's happening and it seems to happen frequently. For instance, if I am in a game of league of legends, my ping will automatically spike up to 500, 1000 or straight out disconnect for 3 seconds (I use ping plotter to keep track as well as google.com -t). Restarting does not help or anything, this also doesn't happen specifically to League of Legends but also MHW, FFXIV and as well as general internet browsing.

I share the network with about 8 other people who do not have this problem at all (8 people have been on the network for a long time and I never had this problem). I seem to be the only one who has this problem. I've also tried using my mobile data to see if it was the network, the same problem persists. No one but myself is using the mobile data but I'm still getting the ping spikes.


- Provide us with the exact specifications of your PC (if applicable) including:
It's an old PC but here are my specs - View: https://imgur.com/a/NTGyPQR

- I don't think it has anything to do with my hardware since I never had this problem before and those parts have not changed.

- Make and model of USB or PCI Wifi adapter
(not sure if this is the correct info but it's just my drivers from device manager) - View: https://i.imgur.com/8KIt0xq.png


I am also running a wired connection through an ethernet cable connected to my MBO
- I've changed all the possible cables connecting from my PC to the Modem (though I don't believe the network or cables are causing the problem since the problem persists even when using mobile data through a USB connection)

Things I've tried -
  • DNS flush
  • Ipconfig commands in CMD to clean it (not entirely sure but I just followed a guide posted by someone from the Microsoft team)
  • Switching cables
  • Updating all my network adapter drivers in device manager
Things I have not tried
- Reinstalling network adapters (not entirely sure how to do this and have no found any thorough guides since I see a lot of people being unable to reinstall once they uninstall since they have no connection)

Cheers
 

SamirD

Honorable
Jan 16, 2014
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So your test with the mobile data proves it's not something with the local network, and the other people on the local network not having an issue points to something on your specific system. I too don't think it's a hardware issue, so that points to software. Windows update perhaps?
 
Feb 6, 2020
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Yeah not sure what the problem was but I managed to fix it. A simple driver uninstall and reinstall worked if anyone else is looking for a solution.
 

Ralston18

Titan
Moderator
Connectivity?

8 people - all wired or some mix of wired and wirless connections?

You mention connecting directly to the modem - is there a router as well?

The router's logs, if available and enabled, may be helpful.

Make and models for modem and router?

Who has full admin rights to the network router? You will need help from that person.
 

Graham Dancy

Honorable
Jun 8, 2013
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Before you go reinventing the wheel or trying to put men on the moon, get simple. Turn off all your network adapters (disable..) and check them one at a time, elsewise you run the risk of your traffic going all over the place.
Second, cmd.exe and test with ping -t 8.8.8.8, dont use apps. Watch with your own eyes as you enable and disable various adapters.
Other possibilities - Router doesn't have enough CPU/RAM and is chugging
Wifi signal is weak
Wifi network is overloaded (wifi can only transmit to 1 host in 1 direction at a time, too many hosts on a weak router will cripple wifi fast.)

Only once you've been through that do you start diving into drivers and cabling. Note, to reinstall a netowrk card, go to the MB webby and get the driver you need before uninstalling it, or do them 1 at a time to keep 1 working, or keep your phone handy to tether it temporarily, or a laptop with ICS turned on, take your pick :)
 
Feb 6, 2020
8
0
10
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Connectivity?

8 people - all wired or some mix of wired and wirless connections?

You mention connecting directly to the modem - is there a router as well?

The router's logs, if available and enabled, may be helpful.

Make and models for modem and router?

Who has full admin rights to the network router? You will need help from that person.
There are currently 2 people on WiFi and 6 connected through wired.

Not entirely sure but there is modem (wired) and router (wifi) if that's what you're asking.

Model for modem: Technicolor DJA0230TLS

I have full access to the network, I believe I can access the logs, I'm just not just sure which exact log I'm looking for or what info.


Before you go reinventing the wheel or trying to put men on the moon, get simple. Turn off all your network adapters (disable..) and check them one at a time, elsewise you run the risk of your traffic going all over the place.
Second, cmd.exe and test with ping -t 8.8.8.8, dont use apps. Watch with your own eyes as you enable and disable various adapters.
Other possibilities - Router doesn't have enough CPU/RAM and is chugging
Wifi signal is weak
Wifi network is overloaded (wifi can only transmit to 1 host in 1 direction at a time, too many hosts on a weak router will cripple wifi fast.)

Only once you've been through that do you start diving into drivers and cabling. Note, to reinstall a netowrk card, go to the MB webby and get the driver you need before uninstalling it, or do them 1 at a time to keep 1 working, or keep your phone handy to tether it temporarily, or a laptop with ICS turned on, take your pick :)
Reinstalling all my WAN ports seems a bit foreign to me, I don't have much time after coming home these days so I want to leave it as a last resort if possible, jsut incase I screw something up.

cmd.exe ping with 8.8.8.8 produces the same result.

Router is fine, no new devices or anything major in the last 12 months.

Wifi - Don't use wifi except on phone which seems to be fine as well.
 

Ralston18

Titan
Moderator
How did you reinstall the network adapter card drivers - manually or via some third party source.

While you have connectivity, download the applicable network card drivers directly from the manufacturer's website

Doublecheck that your computer has the wired network adapter enabled and that the wireless adapter is disabled. Only one adapter or the other should be enabled. Also check that the wired network adapter's Speed and Duplex is set to auto.

Bigger picture:

As I understand the posts to date your computer's connectivity should be as shown in the following line diagram:

IPS --- DSL---> Modem----Ethernet--->[WAN] Router [LAN]-----Ethernet----> Your PC with another 5 wired connections plus two ~~~ wireless~~~> connections.

(Any other network devices: printer, Network storage device, switches?)

Most home modem and routers have only 4 LAN ports. So a couple of wired devices are connected somewhere else. Maybe a switch or access point...?

For your network the modem is Technicolor.

I found the following unofficial "document" for the modem (actually it is a combination modem/router).

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1lDGZ83oZ19Y98rHINe2I7QFqWyaQO9WL/view

Does the document match your modem?

Look at the router and determine its make and model. Who has full admin rights to the router? Post accordingly.
 
Feb 6, 2020
8
0
10
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How did you reinstall the network adapter card drivers - manually or via some third party source.

While you have connectivity, download the applicable network card drivers directly from the manufacturer's website

Doublecheck that your computer has the wired network adapter enabled and that the wireless adapter is disabled. Only one adapter or the other should be enabled. Also check that the wired network adapter's Speed and Duplex is set to auto.

Bigger picture:

As I understand the posts to date your computer's connectivity should be as shown in the following line diagram:

IPS --- DSL---> Modem----Ethernet--->[WAN] Router [LAN]-----Ethernet----> Your PC with another 5 wired connections plus two ~~~ wireless~~~> connections.

(Any other network devices: printer, Network storage device, switches?)

Most home modem and routers have only 4 LAN ports. So a couple of wired devices are connected somewhere else. Maybe a switch or access point...?

For your network the modem is Technicolor.

I found the following unofficial "document" for the modem (actually it is a combination modem/router).

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1lDGZ83oZ19Y98rHINe2I7QFqWyaQO9WL/view

Does the document match your modem?

Look at the router and determine its make and model. Who has full admin rights to the router? Post accordingly.
I downloaded the network adapter card drivers from the original source - https://www.realtek.com/en/component/zoo/category/network-interface-controllers-10-100-1000m-gigabit-ethernet-pci-express-software

Speed and Duplex - Already on auto
Wireless adapter is disabled

There's only a total of 8 people connected. 5 Wired and 3 wireless, the modem has extra access points through a device. I've checked that extra access point and my ethernet cable is not run through there but through the main modem.

The document matches but only with the Admin page, the hardware doesn't seem to match but it's similar. The hosue owner has full admin rights to the router, however, I'm the one they usually come to for things like this. I've been given full permission to access the admin for the router stuff.
 

Ralston18

Titan
Moderator
This:

" the modem has extra access points through a device"...

What is that device - make & model?

So far: a modem, a router, and an Access Point (or perhaps a switch (TBD).

Has anyone configured the Access Point?

Are you familiar with the Command Prompt and able to run "arp -a" (without quotes) via the Command Prompt?

The results should be a list of devices that have been connected to the network. Look for any duplicate IP addresses and use the listed MACs to identify each device.

Two general areas of concern: too little bandwidth available and perhaps an IP address/configuration problem.
 
Feb 6, 2020
8
0
10
0
This:

" the modem has extra access points through a device"...

What is that device - make & model?

So far: a modem, a router, and an Access Point (or perhaps a switch (TBD).

Has anyone configured the Access Point?

Are you familiar with the Command Prompt and able to run "arp -a" (without quotes) via the Command Prompt?

The results should be a list of devices that have been connected to the network. Look for any duplicate IP addresses and use the listed MACs to identify each device.

Two general areas of concern: too little bandwidth available and perhaps an IP address/configuration problem.
Sorry I have to apologise, the hardware on my current network seems to be different and I was only informed today. View: https://imgur.com/a/ctY0ltk
- The red line is my cable that I'm connected to

The Technicolor DJA0230TLS has nothing else on the modem and just says that, should be the first picture if you google it.

Did the CMD thing and accounted for every device.

I don't think it's a bandwidth problem because the same thing happens when I'm using mobile data. IP/Config reset I did as noted above.
 

Ralston18

Titan
Moderator
Very helpful.

However, as you are discovering, the network is not as it seems.

No need to apologize for that. Just about everyone in IT, especially networking, can relate to rogue devices and other similar surprises. :)

Unfortunately, I now have more questions:

The device labeled "Ports leading to cables around the house" - is that a patch panel? Any markings?

And the cables are all Ethernet with each cable going to an Ethernet wall outlet in some room - correct?

Also: that "TP Link extra ports" is that another router, access point, or just a switch? Again model numbers are important.

What I am seeing (or may be seeing) is a network loop with respect to your network.

The connection lines (the red line plus the black lines form a circle/loop with respect to the Technicolor and that "ports" switch or panel serving your computer.

Here is a link to help explain:

https://kb.netgear.com/000060475/What-is-a-network-loop

Knowing that your network has 1) both wired and wireless devices, 2) other "unknown" devices, 3) at least 8 different end-user devices (probably more) and 4) an overall unknown cable layout then the prospect of a network loop should be considered.

And the problem is intermittent because there is some other factor or factors involved; what devices (wired and wireless) are actively on the network and how much bandwidth each of those devices is demanding.

Some threshold value is reached and your computer takes the performance hit.

On the other hand, if your computer's connectivity involves a wall outlet along its connection path - the problem may be just a faulty plug or port.

And you mentioned that the problem continues when using mobile data [connections?].

Overall, my thought is to continue on with identifying network devices and infrastructure ( the cables and connections in place between devices). Wired and wireless.

And, in the meantime someone else following this thread may spot some error of omission or commission on my part and post accordingly. I have no problem with that.
 
Feb 6, 2020
8
0
10
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Very helpful.

However, as you are discovering, the network is not as it seems.

No need to apologize for that. Just about everyone in IT, especially networking, can relate to rogue devices and other similar surprises. :)

Unfortunately, I now have more questions:

The device labeled "Ports leading to cables around the house" - is that a patch panel? Any markings?

And the cables are all Ethernet with each cable going to an Ethernet wall outlet in some room - correct?

Also: that "TP Link extra ports" is that another router, access point, or just a switch? Again model numbers are important.

What I am seeing (or may be seeing) is a network loop with respect to your network.

The connection lines (the red line plus the black lines form a circle/loop with respect to the Technicolor and that "ports" switch or panel serving your computer.

Here is a link to help explain:

https://kb.netgear.com/000060475/What-is-a-network-loop

Knowing that your network has 1) both wired and wireless devices, 2) other "unknown" devices, 3) at least 8 different end-user devices (probably more) and 4) an overall unknown cable layout then the prospect of a network loop should be considered.

And the problem is intermittent because there is some other factor or factors involved; what devices (wired and wireless) are actively on the network and how much bandwidth each of those devices is demanding.

Some threshold value is reached and your computer takes the performance hit.

On the other hand, if your computer's connectivity involves a wall outlet along its connection path - the problem may be just a faulty plug or port.

And you mentioned that the problem continues when using mobile data [connections?].

Overall, my thought is to continue on with identifying network devices and infrastructure ( the cables and connections in place between devices). Wired and wireless.

And, in the meantime someone else following this thread may spot some error of omission or commission on my part and post accordingly. I have no problem with that.
I chcecked the network and there doesn't seem to be any loop from what I saw. I also can't troubleshoot through devices at the given moment (I'll give it a try on the weekend).

But after trying everything I decided to give my mobile data another shot, the same thing happens. No one is using the mobile data but me, I'm not downloading anything but I'm still getting spikes - View: https://i.imgur.com/fWK94Ni.png


At this point, I don't think it's the network at all.
 

nigelivey

Distinguished
I chcecked the network and there doesn't seem to be any loop from what I saw. I also can't troubleshoot through devices at the given moment (I'll give it a try on the weekend).

But after trying everything I decided to give my mobile data another shot, the same thing happens. No one is using the mobile data but me, I'm not downloading anything but I'm still getting spikes - View: https://i.imgur.com/fWK94Ni.png


At this point, I don't think it's the network at all.
Normally if you had a loop it would progressively get worse until unusable, The lights on any lan ports would be going like the clappers!!
 
Reactions: Ralston18

Ralston18

Titan
Moderator
Okay: Somewhat on hold pending more network troubleshooting over the weekend.

Plus @nigelivey 's comment regarding a loop is a very good point. The caveat (in my mine anyway) being that the physical network and the scope of connected devices is still uncertain.

In the meantime then try a different approach that will focus on your computer.

Use Task Manager and Resource Monitor (preferably one at a time) to observe system performance.

Determine what all is running on your system and what resources are being used/consumed accordingly.

Look for some bottleneck or combination of apps that correlate with the spikes and disconnects.

Maybe some buggy app (launched at startup) running in the background on your computer is making attempts to update, back up, or phone home. Takes and fails to release or immediately release network or other computer resources.
 

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