[SOLVED] All USB Ports losing power simultaneously

Apr 2, 2022
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Hi all,

My system occasionally disconnects all devices connected to USB and then reconnects the devices within about 4 seconds (audio will cut out on my headset, keyboard and mouse will disconnect). This started happening a month or two back after I installed a new AIO cooler. It seemed to be happening randomly at first but then after a while I only encountered the issue while gaming. Then it happened twice last night when I was transferring files to two seperate SD cards via SD readers.

I initially suspected that there were too many devices attached to the PC and that the PSU might be struggling under load so removed as many devices as possible the problem persisted. After looking at PC part picker and https://outervision.com/power-supply-calculator, it looks as though there should be plenty of headroom available. Can anyone help with this?

Build is

AMD 5600x
Corsair H60i AIO Cooler
MSI Ventus 3070 3X OC
Corsair 16GB DDR4 3600mhz
Coolermaster MWE 650W gold
2 SSDs and 2 HDDs
Arctis Pro wired
Logitech G502 wireless
Generic gaming keyboard with RGB

Thanks in advance
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
If there are any steps listed here that you have not already done, it would be advisable to do so if for no other reason than to be able to say you've already done it and eliminate that possibility.



First,

Make sure your motherboard has the MOST recent BIOS version installed. If it does not, then update. This solves a high number of issues even in cases where the release that is newer than yours makes no mention of improving graphics card or other hardware compatibility. They do not list every change they have made when they post a new BIOS release. In cases where you DO already have the latest BIOS version, simply resetting the BIOS as follows has a fairly high percentage chance of effecting a positive change in some cases so it is ALWAYS worth TRYING, at the very least.


BIOS Hard Reset procedure

Power off the unit, switch the PSU off and unplug the PSU cord from either the wall or the power supply.

Remove the motherboard CMOS battery for about three to five minutes. In some cases it may be necessary to remove the graphics card to access the CMOS battery.

During that five minutes while the CMOS battery is out of the motherboard, press the power button on the case, continuously, for 15-30 seconds, in order to deplete any residual charge that might be present in the CMOS circuit. After the five minutes is up, reinstall the CMOS battery making sure to insert it with the correct side up just as it came out.

If you had to remove the graphics card you can now reinstall it, but remember to reconnect your power cables if there were any attached to it as well as your display cable.

Now, plug the power supply cable back in, switch the PSU back on and power up the system. It should display the POST screen and the options to enter CMOS/BIOS setup. Enter the bios setup program and reconfigure the boot settings for either the Windows boot manager or for legacy systems, the drive your OS is installed on if necessary.

Save settings and exit. If the system will POST and boot then you can move forward from there including going back into the bios and configuring any other custom settings you may need to configure such as Memory XMP, A-XMP or D.O.C.P profile settings, custom fan profile settings or other specific settings you may have previously had configured that were wiped out by resetting the CMOS.

In some cases it may be necessary when you go into the BIOS after a reset, to load the Optimal default or Default values and then save settings, to actually get the hardware tables to reset in the boot manager.

It is probably also worth mentioning that for anything that might require an attempt to DO a hard reset in the first place, IF the problem is related to a lack of video signal, it is a GOOD IDEA to try a different type of display as many systems will not work properly for some reason with displayport configurations. It is worth trying HDMI if you are having no display or lack of visual ability to enter the BIOS, or no signal messages.

Trying a different monitor as well, if possible, is also a good idea if there is a lack of display. It happens.


Second,

Go to the product page for your motherboard on the manufacturer website. Download and install the latest driver versions for the chipset, storage controllers, audio and network adapters. Do not skip installing a newer driver just because you think it is not relevant to the problem you are having. The drivers for one device can often affect ALL other devices and a questionable driver release can cause instability in the OS itself. They don't release new drivers just for fun. If there is a new driver release for a component, there is a good reason for it. The same goes for BIOS updates. When it comes to the chipset drivers, if your motherboard manufacturer lists a chipset driver that is newer than what the chipset developer (Intel or AMD, for our purposes) lists, then use that one. If Intel (Or AMD) shows a chipset driver version that is newer than what is available from the motherboard product page, then use that one. Always use the newest chipset driver that you can get and always use ONLY the chipset drivers available from either the motherboard manufacturer, AMD or Intel.


IF you have other hardware installed or attached to the system that are not a part of the systems covered by the motherboard drivers, then go to the support page for THAT component and check to see if there are newer drivers available for that as well. If there are, install them.


Third,

Make sure your memory is running at the correct advertised speed in the BIOS. This may require that you set the memory to run at the XMP profile settings. Also, make sure you have the memory installed in the correct slots and that they are running in dual channel which you can check by installing CPU-Z and checking the Memory and SPD tabs. For all modern motherboards that are dual channel memory architectures, from the last ten years at least, if you have two sticks installed they should be in the A2 (Called DDR4_1 on some boards) or B2 (Called DDR4_2 on some boards) which are ALWAYS the SECOND and FOURTH slots over from the CPU socket, counting TOWARDS the edge of the motherboard EXCEPT on boards that only have two memory slots total. In that case, if you have two modules it's not rocket science, but if you have only one, then install it in the A1 or DDR4_1 slot.



Fourth (And often tied for most important along with an up-to-date motherboard BIOS),

A clean install of the graphics card drivers. Regardless of whether you "already installed the newest drivers" for your graphics card or not, it is OFTEN a good idea to do a CLEAN install of the graphics card drivers. Just installing over the old drivers OR trying to use what Nvidia and AMD consider a clean install is not good enough and does not usually give the same result as using the Display Driver Uninstaller utility. This has a very high success rate and is always worth a shot.


If you have had both Nvidia and AMD cards installed at any point on that operating system then you will want to run the DDU twice. Once for the old card drivers (ie, Nvidia or AMD) and again for the currently installed graphics card drivers (ie, AMD or Nvidia). So if you had an Nvidia card at some point in the past, run it first for Nvidia and then after that is complete, run it again for AMD if you currently have an AMD card installed.


Graphics card driver CLEAN install guide using the Wagnard tools DDU



And last, but not least, if you have never done a CLEAN install of Windows, or have upgraded from an older version to Windows 10, or have been through several spring or fall major Windows updates, it might be a very good idea to consider doing a clean install of Windows if none of these other solutions has helped. IF you are using a Windows installation from a previous system and you didn't do a clean install of Windows after building the new system, then it's 99.99% likely that you NEED to do a CLEAN install before trying any other solutions.


How to do a CLEAN installation of Windows 10, the RIGHT way
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
If there are any steps listed here that you have not already done, it would be advisable to do so if for no other reason than to be able to say you've already done it and eliminate that possibility.



First,

Make sure your motherboard has the MOST recent BIOS version installed. If it does not, then update. This solves a high number of issues even in cases where the release that is newer than yours makes no mention of improving graphics card or other hardware compatibility. They do not list every change they have made when they post a new BIOS release. In cases where you DO already have the latest BIOS version, simply resetting the BIOS as follows has a fairly high percentage chance of effecting a positive change in some cases so it is ALWAYS worth TRYING, at the very least.


BIOS Hard Reset procedure

Power off the unit, switch the PSU off and unplug the PSU cord from either the wall or the power supply.

Remove the motherboard CMOS battery for about three to five minutes. In some cases it may be necessary to remove the graphics card to access the CMOS battery.

During that five minutes while the CMOS battery is out of the motherboard, press the power button on the case, continuously, for 15-30 seconds, in order to deplete any residual charge that might be present in the CMOS circuit. After the five minutes is up, reinstall the CMOS battery making sure to insert it with the correct side up just as it came out.

If you had to remove the graphics card you can now reinstall it, but remember to reconnect your power cables if there were any attached to it as well as your display cable.

Now, plug the power supply cable back in, switch the PSU back on and power up the system. It should display the POST screen and the options to enter CMOS/BIOS setup. Enter the bios setup program and reconfigure the boot settings for either the Windows boot manager or for legacy systems, the drive your OS is installed on if necessary.

Save settings and exit. If the system will POST and boot then you can move forward from there including going back into the bios and configuring any other custom settings you may need to configure such as Memory XMP, A-XMP or D.O.C.P profile settings, custom fan profile settings or other specific settings you may have previously had configured that were wiped out by resetting the CMOS.

In some cases it may be necessary when you go into the BIOS after a reset, to load the Optimal default or Default values and then save settings, to actually get the hardware tables to reset in the boot manager.

It is probably also worth mentioning that for anything that might require an attempt to DO a hard reset in the first place, IF the problem is related to a lack of video signal, it is a GOOD IDEA to try a different type of display as many systems will not work properly for some reason with displayport configurations. It is worth trying HDMI if you are having no display or lack of visual ability to enter the BIOS, or no signal messages.

Trying a different monitor as well, if possible, is also a good idea if there is a lack of display. It happens.


Second,

Go to the product page for your motherboard on the manufacturer website. Download and install the latest driver versions for the chipset, storage controllers, audio and network adapters. Do not skip installing a newer driver just because you think it is not relevant to the problem you are having. The drivers for one device can often affect ALL other devices and a questionable driver release can cause instability in the OS itself. They don't release new drivers just for fun. If there is a new driver release for a component, there is a good reason for it. The same goes for BIOS updates. When it comes to the chipset drivers, if your motherboard manufacturer lists a chipset driver that is newer than what the chipset developer (Intel or AMD, for our purposes) lists, then use that one. If Intel (Or AMD) shows a chipset driver version that is newer than what is available from the motherboard product page, then use that one. Always use the newest chipset driver that you can get and always use ONLY the chipset drivers available from either the motherboard manufacturer, AMD or Intel.


IF you have other hardware installed or attached to the system that are not a part of the systems covered by the motherboard drivers, then go to the support page for THAT component and check to see if there are newer drivers available for that as well. If there are, install them.


Third,

Make sure your memory is running at the correct advertised speed in the BIOS. This may require that you set the memory to run at the XMP profile settings. Also, make sure you have the memory installed in the correct slots and that they are running in dual channel which you can check by installing CPU-Z and checking the Memory and SPD tabs. For all modern motherboards that are dual channel memory architectures, from the last ten years at least, if you have two sticks installed they should be in the A2 (Called DDR4_1 on some boards) or B2 (Called DDR4_2 on some boards) which are ALWAYS the SECOND and FOURTH slots over from the CPU socket, counting TOWARDS the edge of the motherboard EXCEPT on boards that only have two memory slots total. In that case, if you have two modules it's not rocket science, but if you have only one, then install it in the A1 or DDR4_1 slot.



Fourth (And often tied for most important along with an up-to-date motherboard BIOS),

A clean install of the graphics card drivers. Regardless of whether you "already installed the newest drivers" for your graphics card or not, it is OFTEN a good idea to do a CLEAN install of the graphics card drivers. Just installing over the old drivers OR trying to use what Nvidia and AMD consider a clean install is not good enough and does not usually give the same result as using the Display Driver Uninstaller utility. This has a very high success rate and is always worth a shot.


If you have had both Nvidia and AMD cards installed at any point on that operating system then you will want to run the DDU twice. Once for the old card drivers (ie, Nvidia or AMD) and again for the currently installed graphics card drivers (ie, AMD or Nvidia). So if you had an Nvidia card at some point in the past, run it first for Nvidia and then after that is complete, run it again for AMD if you currently have an AMD card installed.


Graphics card driver CLEAN install guide using the Wagnard tools DDU



And last, but not least, if you have never done a CLEAN install of Windows, or have upgraded from an older version to Windows 10, or have been through several spring or fall major Windows updates, it might be a very good idea to consider doing a clean install of Windows if none of these other solutions has helped. IF you are using a Windows installation from a previous system and you didn't do a clean install of Windows after building the new system, then it's 99.99% likely that you NEED to do a CLEAN install before trying any other solutions.


How to do a CLEAN installation of Windows 10, the RIGHT way
 
Apr 2, 2022
2
0
10
0
Thanks for the response.

I hadn't thought to look for an updated BIOS as I installed the latest when I got the machine. Turns out there's a fairly recent update, so installed it and haven't encountered the issue since. However I've went weeks without the issue occuring and then the disconnects come thick and fast so will have to wait and see!
 
Jul 1, 2022
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Any other suggestions for this post? I've currently been running into this for a while now. In shooter games my headset would cut out and whatever keys / mouse buttons I was holding at the time of the quick crash would be stuck (ie. stuck running forward and shooting until I unplug my devices and plug them back in). I was managing to just deal with it forever until now. I have purchased F1 2022 and am using a wheel. When it disconnects now (the disconnect is literal seconds), the wheel resets and does a recalibration and spins around. Headset still cuts out... and using VR to race with the oculus loses connection and resets. I have tried the solutions above and have not seen a change. It was very intermittent and I cannot seem to track down what is causing. Closing Razer Synapse and all Razer apps has definitely helped lower the amount of resets that happen.

Bios is up to date, fresh install of windows is good. Updated / Clean install of graphics drivers completed, memory sticks are in the correct slots.

Thanks in advance!
 
could be something like: usb headset does not get some packet, thinks the hub is asleep so it resets the hub and all devices connected to the hub are disconnected and reconnected.

this can happen when too much usb traffic is going on. any RBG drivers that are changing colors generate a lot of usb traffic. so does the AIO. you might consider moving some of these devices to a different usb hub.
then put your headset on a fast hub with fewer devices on it.
Most of the devices are not able to reset the usb bus except for the headset.

RBG looks cool but the drivers often are set to run through all of the colors as fast as they can. Problem is they are doing 100000 colors a minute and each one takes a usb call and also generates one line of data in the usb internal logs.
Maybe try a solid color to reduce this load.

AIO, often also generate a huge amount of USB traffic to set the colors and to read the temps too fast.

on current motherboards all of the usb traffic goes thru the PCI/e bus that is shared with the graphics card. This traffic can also cause a graphic timeout (2 second) and windows will reset the PCI/e bus and disconnect the graphics and the usb devices and reconnect them.

you will also want to update the firmware of your usb devices if you can.

(updating bios and drivers as mentioned in previous post would be good, be sure to pick up the chipset drivers and any external usb or thunderbolt driver if you have thunderbolt. generally, you do not want to install the motherboard utilites or any special usb filters or usb charger drivers)

old removed usb devices can also still cause a problem since the driver is hidden and not removed when the device is removed from the port.
you will want to go into windows control panel, find device manager, find the menu option to show hidden devices, select it and delete all of the greyed out entries.

while you are at it you might use device manager and look at the hubs and right click them to bring up properties, find the power management tab and tell windows not to put them to sleep. (most likely not a problem in this case)

I can think of a few more cases that would cause this problem but the are pretty rare. Anything else would require debugging.
 

Ralston18

Titan
Moderator
Use Task Manager and Resource Monitor to observe system performance. First while not gaming then while gaming.

Use both tools but only one tool at a time. Watch what resources are being used, to what extent (%), and what is using any given resource.

And look in Reliability History and Event Viewer. Either one or both may be capturing error codes, warnings, or informational events that precede or correspond with the time of some USB power loss or other problem that occurs.

How old is the PSU? History of heavy gaming use?
 
Jul 1, 2022
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So I dont want to jynx it here but I believe it figured it out. A restart always seemed to fix it for a bit. I restarted my PC and played games alone all day and didn't use discord once. I use Control+Shift as my mute. And so after playing an entire time without anyone I had no stutters. Then as soon as I started playing with people I'd mute my discord. So today I changed my hotkey for mute and they have been gone all day. So I think hitting Cntrl+shift was doing some sort of shortcut and was causing issues. This has taken me over 6 months to realize. Anyone know what Cntrl+ Shift does? haha. Thanks everyone for your inputs!
 

Ralston18

Titan
Moderator

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