Question Alseye 90mm dual tower or Snowman 120mm single tower

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Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
What is the model of your case and how many case fans do you have. I've never heard, even in high ambient temperature regions, of the stock fan not being sufficient for the i5-4590. It may be that you don't really need a different CPU cooler at all, it might be CASE airflow that is lacking. The stock cooler can't work very well if there is not sufficient airflow through the case to provide it with cooler ambient air.
 
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Arun05

Honorable
Oct 20, 2013
184
4
10,715
10
What is the model of your case and how many case fans do you have. I've never heard, even in high ambient temperature regions, of the stock fan not being sufficient for the i5-4590. It may be that you don't really need a different CPU cooler at all, it might be CASE airflow that is lacking. The stock cooler can't work very well if there is not sufficient airflow through the case to provide it with cooler ambient air.
I have a Chiptronex Raptor RGB Case with 3 intake(front) 1 exhausted(back)
And then I added extra 3 fans on top (top front intake and top middle and top back exhaust)
Totally 7 fans all 120mm 50CFM
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
My advice would be to take the middle and front top fans OUT, because they are almost certainly "stealing" air from the current CPU cooler. When you have more than just the rear and top rear exhaust fans you do not usually end up with the desired airpath from front to rear. It just tends to make a v-line straight out the top of the case rather than passing over all your hardware AND more importantly, feeding the CPU cooler with cool ambient air. That means the CPU cooler end up using whatever heated air has risen up from the graphics card and power supply through stack effect.
 
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Karadjgne

Titan
Herald
Airflow and liquid flow are often compared because they share the same qualities. In this, think like a river, starts out low in front, picks up tributaries along the way, headed for the top rear corner. By having those top center exhaust fans, you effectively split the flow, not add to it, the cpu cooler will only help push the air towards the rear, but that top center fan is pulling flow in a different direction. Split.

So you don't end up with a good strong river of cooler air flowing to the exhaust corner, you get a couple small streams, again, which doesn't help much at all.
 
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Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Actually, it won't. You are better off with the middle and front top fan locations either have nothing there, or better yet, being closed completely off somehow, such as with some kind of block off plate etc., than having anything in those locations if it is an air cooled system. There are likely other factors at play if it is a front mounted radiator water cooled system, but that is for another discussion since that is not the case here.

I know some people will argue that those fan locations are there for a reason, and they are, it just isn't generally a reason that coincides with the best possible cooling configuration. Two (or three) intakes and two exhaust fans are just about perfect, especially when the two exhaust fans are in the rear and top rear locations, for optimal airflow AND air path. At least with cases that have bottom mounted power supplies.
 
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