AMD Announces Ryzen Threadripper, Challenges Intel With 12C/16X For $799 and $999

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ClusT3R

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The only that Zen architecture needs is the dev community start playing with the architecture and legacy programs start using the benefits of the new architecture.
 

jowen3400

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That is what the I9 should have started it. It is not that much faster than x99, insome cases it is worst. Heat is one that comes to mind.
 

bit_user

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AMD released a video that outlines the basics of the launch and pits both Threadripper models against Intel's Core i9-7900X in a Multi-Threaded Cinebench R15 workload.
Man, they better hope Maxon doesn't decide to add some AVX optimizations in Cinebench.
 

drumbum

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"...now that AMD is squeezing the entire desktop spectrum..."

How great was it to write that!?!
Regardless of which team you root for, that's gotta be a great thing to hear finally. It certainly put a smile on me!
 

drumbum

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"...now that AMD is squeezing the entire desktop spectrum..."

How great was it to write that!?!
Regardless of which team you root for, that's gotta be a great thing to hear finally. It certainly put a smile on me!
 

HdwJunkie

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If these parts can be cooled successfully, Intel has a problem. I wonder if Intel is going to make a change in the higher end parts to solve the problems seen in cooling the 7900x.
 

kinggremlin

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Yes, competition is good. Too bad Intel doesn't care what AMD does, and AMD is incapable of engineering a CPU faster than Intel so we're not seeing any competition benefits at the home user level. Remember when Intel and AMD used to drop CPU prices top to bottom a few times a year? They never do it anymore, Intel just eventually replaces it when they release a new tweaked lineup. Ryzen has had zero effect on the pricing of Intel's existing Skylake/Kaby Lake and Broadwell-E lineups.

When was the last time a CPU was released that was genuinely faster than its predecessor across the board? Sandy Bridge? That was released in February of 2011. We're 6 years on, and I don't care who you root for, Ryzen is no Sandy Bridge. Are we ever going to see another Sandy Bridge? Neither Intel's (Coffee Lake, Cannon Lake, IceLake, Tiger Lake, Whocares Lake, all just die shrinks or "optimization" nodes) or AMD's roadmaps give any reason to be optimistic, unless Intel is hiding a completely new architecture (AMD just released their brand new one, so we know nothing new for years), or there is a dramatic shift in mainstream software benefits from more than 3 or 4 cores. Neither of those scenarios seems likely.

If you are a mainstream user or even an enthusiast gamer, we are not seeing lower prices and we are not seeing better performance. So what are we seeing that we should care about? I'm genuinely interested to know what CPU's you people are using currently that makes Ryzen either much faster than what you currently use or much cheaper to upgrade to than what Intel is offering. I know the prices, so don't tell me a 10 core BW-E is $1700, and AMD sells a 10 core whatever for X less. One, no one is buying those for gaming or putting in a desktop at home for their kids, and two, no one who owns a 6950x is going to spend the money to replace it with the Ryzen equivalent. I mean real world examples of Ryzen systems you have bought for yourself and what you upgraded from.
 


They are pretty much the same margins. For example the $999 part is two 1800x's glued together which costs slightly more than two 1800x's which should make up for higher manufacturing costs for the interconnects, larger heat spreader, etc. Obviously I don't know the exact costs on how much more it takes to glue two dies together but reasoning it out the margins are pretty similar.
 

drajitsh

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Gremlin
1. Not everybody who buys a computer, buys it for gaming ONLY.
2. My main laptop is Haswell, and I get good use out of AES-NI
3. MY WORKLOADS BENEFIT FROM MORE CORES & HYPERTHREADING.
4. I've been waiting, for a CPU that is NOT I/O bottlenecked. Now, once the smoke clears I'm planning to buy.
5. Intel DOES have an ace up its sleeve. It's called coffeelake. Around a month ago it was reported that coffeelake would have 4 cores in 15 W. That means a brand NEW architecture.
 


Agree on 1-4 Its a great year for those that needs more threads and IO.

Coffee lake is not a new architecture just tweak on the existing core architecture, same for Cannonlake its a dies shrink of the same architecture. Intel doesn't have a new architecture until Icelake. Splitting hairs a bit.

 

RomeoReject

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I really want to know how the baby Ryzen 3 ends up doing. I'm painfully poor, so if/when I make the change, I can't blow $500 on a CPU, MoBo and RAM. If the four-core is an appreciable jump, I may look it to it though.
 

BulkZerker

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@kinggremlin

I own a 6600k Skylake based system. It's going to be replaced by a ryzen system soon enough now that the bios has matured properly. Likely to be a 1600. I'm tired of how stuttery a quad core is. Thread ripper is also on the menu as AMD claims getting 4.0 GHz on the boost clocks.if that can happen and they don't have the same memory gremlin as ryzen then there is absolutely no reason not to buy if you have the money and don't like having to buy a motherboard with your processor every time you upgrade. (Skylake to kabylake anyone? I ran a 7700k for a friend to verify his Mobo was DOA but it was a unstable mess. Coffee lake threatens to do the same thing.)
 

dudmont

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What market share will be required for this to happen, that is the question of the day.
 
Fantasy Alert
Two years ago when Fiji (and all those supporting slides) dropped I did some 'napkin calculations.' Several of the slides revealed a 'CPU/GPU SoC' on an interposer flanked by HBM stacks. I figured that a beefy version of that sucker would require a 'soldered' BGA package with no upgrade path, or at best would likely require 4,000+ pins for 'drop-in' silicon. Lo and behold ... TR4/SP3 ...

That socket must be 5Kmm2+. Being able to upgrade HEDT/Enterprise rigs with massive, new TFLOP'ing 'processing units' would be quite a feat.

I hope Don is getting stock options because he's going to be buying the beer!



ClusT3R said:
The only that Zen architecture needs is the dev community start playing with the architecture and legacy programs start using the benefits of the new architecture.
What market share will be required for this to happen, that is the question of the day.
I'm thinking the exact opposite. AMD's TR4/SP3 sockets are a disruptive 'new market' next-gen solution for future development that so happens to work just dandy with current and legacy propositions ...

You can bet that Chipzilla is spending billions, and designing 1,000s-more 'landings' beyond LGA2011 in response. I don't necessarily think they were caught flat-footed, but they likely underestimated where DAAMIT 'fusion' was headed 10 years ago.

My only fear is that Intel will use their market 'heft' to constrain AMD (as they have in the past). I feel like AMD is better positioned this go-round to fight back -- not only with their arch but in the channel, too.

 

kinggremlin

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1. Don't selectively quote. I said mainstream user to enthusiast gamer.
Not that it matters, you didn't even make a point, all you did was say I was wrong without backing it up with anything. Below I have listed all the programs you will find on a typical home computer that will run faster on an 18 core 4 GHz CPU vs a 4 core 4.5 GHz CPU:

...

Feel free to tell me I am wrong again and then provide zero data to the contrary.

2 - 4. What on earth are you talking about? You bought an unspecified Haswell based laptop for home use to run what you believe to be an I/O bottlenecked unnamed software package that utilizes the AES-NI instruction set. That makes logical sense. And now, you are going to replace your laptop with a workstation/HEDT that utilizes an unspecified model of Threadripper. Why did you quote my post if you weren't going to respond with anything of remote relevance to what I said?

Someone else has already enlightened you that Coffelake is not going to be the next Sandy Bridge. I don't think you understood what I meant anyway.

Conroe - 40% more performance at 40% less power (compared to Pentium D)
Nehalem - 10–25% better single-threaded performance (compared to Penryn)
Sandy Bridge - average performance increase at clock to clock is 11.3% compared to the Nehalem
Ivy Bridge - 3% to 6% increase in CPU performance when compared clock for clock
Haswell - Up to 5% faster single-threaded performance
Broadwell - 3.3% faster
Skylake - 2.5% faster
Kaby Lake - 0%?

This trend is not going in a positive direction. Sandy Bridge is the last CPU architecture released that saw a double digit single-threaded performance increase from the previous generation. Ryzen is no Sandy Bridge, and Coffee Lake won't be either.

Thank you for playing. Next...
 
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