AMD Drops 3DNow! Support From Future CPUs

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ajcroteau

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3DNow was huge back in the day... I had a couple of K6-2 cpu's and both ran fairly well... but it looks like it's gone the way of the dinosaurs...
 

mavroxur

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3DNow! has been surpassed by....how many code extensions? And if your software supported 3DNow!, the software will still run, just without the extensions now. Which might be a performance issue....if your software wasn't 15 years old and designed to run on K6-2 CPU's anyways. So the 10% performance hit you take from no 3DNow! will be canceled by the 1000000% performance gain from a modern CPU :)
 

COLGeek

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Things change. 3DNow! served its purpose and that is now behind us. In the day, 3DNow! was cool, but not often used so its passing at a time when CPUs are so much more advanced could have passed without an AMD announcement (except in the old dude SW dev world). BTW, I am one of those old dudes.
 

Shin-san

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This makes sense. There have been so many CPU extensions like SSE that have replaced 3DNow! It's actually a requirement that SSE2 is standard in x64 CPUs
 

chick0n

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Losing 3Dnow! is not really a big deal. We have all these fast CPU and now even GPU will be able to help crunching numbers really really fast.

but my question is, does it take that much of a resource to "keep" 3Dnow! extension in the CPU logic? or is it causing some of the problems ?

only AMD knows.
 

rocky1234

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Well even though it served it's purpose back in the day I do not think many or if any modern programs use it any longer. So if this makes more die space so AMD can ad other features into their CPU's I am all for it.

I'm sure Quake 2 will run fine still without it..lol :)
 

Sorax

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I played the original Half-Life on a K6-2 in 1998. And continued to use it for years with TF and CS. So thanks for the wonderful memories 3DNow!
 

COLGeek

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I actually still have a K6-2+ based Sony Vaio at home with a whopping 256MB of RAM running Puppy Linux. When we bought it for my wife, it was state of the art and came pre-loaded with Windows ME (that was removed within minutes of opening the box and replaced with Win2K).

Even so, if I had to guess, the 3DNow! extensions were likely never used on this machine as it was never used for games.

Regardless, it is cool to discuss these changes in the tech landscape.
 

harth13

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wikipedia says "The 3DNow! instruction set was created during the late 1990s when 3D graphics were exploding in popularity because of 3D gaming, and 3D games heavily use floating-point arithmetic."

and i say old
 
G

Guest

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AMD could have easily updated the 3D Now instruction set but for one reason, fusion, any amount of SSE will never come near to the power of a real gfx processor

now i have to wonder if GPGPU does take off, will it make SSE new and old obsolete
 

orionantares

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No surprise. AMD simpl wasn't extending 3DNow instead they were working wth Intel's SSE and helped extend that once or twice, especially in the AMD64 architecture.
 

2real

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[citation][nom]iggybeans[/nom]As this decision affects backward compatibility, I personally view it as a negative.[/citation]
are you thick? you can still play the games you'll just get 500 fps instead of 550
 
G

Guest

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Breaking! Crysis reports 1.2FPS now that AMD has dropped its feature!
 
The reason behind 3DNow and SSE was to improve performance. On the Intel side performance increased by 60% just by adding the instruction sets even on a clock by clock bases with the same core. You all can look up old articles about this or do lot of benchmarking on vintage systems to see it's impact. Modern cpu get most of their performance from SSE while AMD's 3DNow if optimized can see big gains but that is a waste knowing market share. Basically what these instruction sets do is allow the FPU to cheat in certain calculations and reduce the time needed to complete them. Some can be scripted for encryption or multimedia decoding ect. However there are limits and to how much scripting can be done as well the limits of the architecture of the cpu core/s. This is why emulation of different platforms such as Power PC, Amiga, and many game consoles are so difficult.

The First cpu to include such scripting for the improvement of performance was the Zilog Z80.
 
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