AMD Ram compatibility

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NKR 8055

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Good Day all.

Here are the parts i will be ordering soon:
Asus rog strix B350-F
AMD Ryzen3 1200 4Core 3.1Ghz CPU + Wraith Cooler
Asus ROG Strix GeForce GTX 1050 Ti OC 04GB GDDR5
Antec True Power Classic 550W
Corsair Vengeance LPX 16GB (1x16GB) DDR4 DRAM DIMM 3000MHz -
Intel 600p 128GB 80mm PCIE 3.0 X4 M.2 SSD SSDPEKKW128G7X1

My main concern is the ram frequency being rated higher than stated in the cpu specs. (2666)

if i run this ram will it then be overclocked to a point where i will run into cooling issues? (i dont want to purchase an aftermarket cooler just yet)

Please note: i am already in possession of an HDD and chassis which is why they dont show on the list
i have opted to go with one single 16gb ram stick rather than 2 8GB because i will be adding another stick later on. if i were to eventually fill up all the ram slots i would prefer to have the max amount of memory

Thanks in advance
 

bjornl

Admirable
Lots of people run that very ram. I used the 3200 version of the same Corsair LPX on a pair of thread ripper builds. Worked flawlessly up until I went over 64gb, at which point I had to fiddle with the timings (and could no longer get 3200mhz).

This does not mean you are guaranteed 3000mhz. There are more variables than if your ram is compatible. You probably will hit that speed. You might have to flash the bios.

Many on here will tell you that mixing ram on a Ryzen system is a dicey. I tested this on the Threadrippers. I mixed and matched ram kits (all from Corsair and all with the same timing and speed (same part number too)). And even when I used four different kits I had no issues. So it will probably work (adding a 2nd 16gb stick) so long as all the timing and such are identical. But unless you have a real need for 32gb of ram, I would suggest you get a pair of 8gb sticks. You skip the possible compatibility issue. You also get faster ram since it will run in dual-channel mode.
 

Darkbreeze

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Ok, as per your PM I'll just say the following. Bjornl is correct is most of what he is saying, and might in fact be 100% correct based on his experience. His experience or experiences do not necessarily correspond to everybody else's AND what what works with one platform or cpu, or even the exact same configuration, is not always mirrored on the next persons attempt.

I just recently went through this with both a build I did for a client AND a member who posted a help thread here at Tom's. While the information below only actually applies to the Tom's thread, the reason for the trouble they ran into and the end result were approximately the same. This has always been a factor, on ALL platforms, since forever. The fact that the modules are higher clocked is not a problem though. They will either run at their supposed configuration speeds or they won't. So long as they DO work together, you can try to tune them in using minor adjustments if they don't want to run at that speed and worse case scenario is that you end up running them a slightly lower speed but this is not bad, as memory designed to run at higher speeds will almost always run at any lower speed with less voltage and therefore will run cooler and last longer. I always buy memory that is capable of running at a higher speed than what I intend to run it at, when buying it for myself.



It's true that a lot of the time you CAN mix and match RAM and so long as you keep the module selection limited to models with fairly similar or nearly exact specs, they will play nice together. Even, sometimes, completely disparate modules will do so with one module having it's primary settings adjusted by the system to match the other, lower clocked module. This is NOT always the case however AND instances of memory that are not identical or in fact even MATCHED and TESTED to work together, not working together, have been on the rise since the introduction of DDR4. At least from what I have seen through my own experience using them on builds and from what I've seen here in addition to what I've read at a number of different places including reviews and other forums.

The biggest problem, I think, is that companies like G.Skill, Corsair, Kingston, etc., do not actually make the memory chips used on their modules and they tend to source those ICs from a variety of different places, even on some of their highest end offerings. Buying another memory module later on that is the EXACT SAME part number is NO guarantee that you will be getting either an identical module or even one that is close to the same. For example, in the image below you can see that although the two lower pictured items have the same exact part number, having likely been part of different production runs that completely changed up the configuration of the modules, they do not use the same size IC, the same brand of IC, the IC are ranked differently and one module is single sided while the other has ICs on both sides.






None of these things SPECIFICALLY means that these modules won't work together, howerver, these are THE EXACT SAME part number, so you can imagine what kinds of differences there might be between two modules that are entirely different part numbers even though they might be the same series and manufacturer. What it does mean, while there is no absolute condition saying these can't play nice together, is that for every factor that is different there is an increased possibility that for whatever reason (wildly different sub-settings, voltage requirements, or just plain oneriness) they may require advanced tuning or in the end may simply refuse to work together regardless of configuration settings. It happens. Nothing Bjornl or anybody else says can change the fact that sometimes modules simply WILL NOT play nice together and the further you stray from "completely identical" the higher the probability is in most cases that this will be so. Again, that does not mean that in some cases you won't be able to use two wildly different modules together. That happens too.

But there are significant headaches involved in trying to get two modules to run, either together OR in dual channel operation, when they don't want to. Sometimes the resulting headache includes having to go through the hassle of tuning only to find out that it ain't happening and you now have to go through the additional hassle of trying to return the memory which involves generating a return, getting it approved, waiting while it's shipped and received so you can get a credit and then try another part number. And after all that, when you get a different module, you are still at the mercy of a potential crapshoot because the next module or part number might not have any more success than the first one did. Of course, you might get lucky on the very first attempt as well or there may simply be no issue at all and the modules or motherboard you have may be very forgiving of differences between modules.

We have very clear and compelling evidence to show that the CPU and motherboard sometimes play a role in this as well, but that's a whole other conversation. Furthermore, and this is just an impulse opinion which is not fact but is based on some experiences in the past with enterprise level hardware, it seems entirely likely to me that Threadripper and X399, which are at least semi-enterprise hardwares (Using hardware from the Epyc skus. Some will of course argue that these are not actually enterprise hardwares, but that too is a separate argument.), not enthusiast or mainstream hardwares (At least, not strictly, by intent), are probably somewhat more likely to adhere to a somewhat different standard that the mainstream/enthusiast Ryzen (3, 5 and 7) lineup since it also supports ECC and quad channel operation (Using TWO dual channel memory controllers) as well as having a Non Uniform Memory Access architecture which Ryzen 3, 5 and 7 do not share.

NUMA is a completely different can of worms involving too many factors to explain or argue here, but suffice to say that it the platform AS A WHOLE is significantly different than what is used by it's smaller brethren, enough so that I believe direct comparisons are unfair and probably not entirely realistic. What works on Ryzen 7 may not actually be the same as what the best practices are when using Threadripper or Epyc. I'm sure they probably share a lot of similarities too and I'm not claiming to be an expert on ANY of these hardwares, only a systems builder and enthusiast who know enough to steer clear of as many potential complications as possible, whenever possible.

To that effect, I feel the same as most others here and as our previously resident memory expert Tradesman1 did, which is that if you are going to buy memory you should make every effort to buy the amount of memory you every plan to use from the start, and do it by buying them in a matched/tested set that uses the fewest possible number of modules needed to obtain the desired total capacity. This not only greatly increases the probability that your memory will be a trouble free component of your build but it also allows that later on down the road, if in fact you discover at some point that your memory capacity is NOT enough, you still have room to add more.

Yes, you WILL be facing THIS exact problem we are discussing if that eventuality comes about, but at least you will have the option of doing so without having to buy ALL of the memory over again in order to obtain higher capacity sticks. You can take you chances, or you can be fairly certain that what you are purchasing will work without any added complications. It is worth noting though that in some few cases, there have been instances of even memory purchased together in a matched set not playing nice together despite supposedly having been tested as compatible, so even if you do so there still remains an element of uncertainty ANY time two modules are used together but it's a necessary evil since dual channel operation cannot be achieved with a single module.

Again, it's worth noting that I am NOT disputing anything Bjornl has said, only expanding on it and offering a wider view of the picture in general.
 
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NKR 8055

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Thank you both for your very insightful and informative answers.

My main concern was the RAM being so incompatible that the system doesn't work AT ALL. (lol please forgive me as this is my first build EVER)
My other concern is that if it works, does the higher frequency ram mean my cpu will run at a higher frequency? and if so will the standard cpu cooler be sufficient for the time being until i upgrade the cooler in about a year or so?

"in some few cases, there have been instances of even memory purchased together in a matched set not playing nice together despite supposedly having been tested as compatible"

This little statement leads me to believe that while it is a better idea to buy a set of two sticks together if i want 32GB of ram... its not an absolutely terrible idea to buy a second identical RAM stick later on (also in a year).


So heres what im going to do based on both responses:
purchase the RAM stated in my parts list. and when i do buy a second stick of ram, i wil get the very same make and model. try and run it in duel channel mode and hope for the best... what say you?

 

Darkbreeze

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RAM running at a faster frequency will not make your CPU run at a faster "frequency". In other words, just because your memory runs at 3000mhz instead of 2133mhz does not mean your CPU will automagically overclock itself to 3.8Ghz instead of 3.5Ghz (Just as an abstract example).

Your CPU will run at whatever frequency/speed it is set and designed to run at, including whatever turbo profile it is configured with. It MIGHT however make it "seem" to run faster, since it will be able to do things more quickly without waiting on memory operations. There is also evidence that the AMD infinity fabric further accentuates the overall performance when faster memory is used.

As far as it not being compatible "at all" that is generally not going to be the case, with a caveat. There are clearly some instances of memory that has poor compatibility (But again, not necessarily in EVERY case) with the Ryzen platform and twice this week I've encountered new AMD builds that no amount of troubleshooting or configuration would resolve using Corsair Vengeance LPX modules. I can link to those if needed, but suffice to say that those are not the only instances of some issues there. I might better recommend the G.Skill Flare-X or Trident Z modules, as they seem to have better compatibility with most Ryzen configurations.

This observation MIGHT be somewhat biased as I tend to like G.Skill memory a lot better than Corsair in general anyhow, but there are a good many threads and articles out there that seem to support some aspects of this in any case. Overall modules using Samsung B-die ICs tend to have very good compatibility, but this is true of almost every platform since they are the arguably the highest quality ICs out there. There may also be some other factors involved, but that tends to be a weighted one. Here is a list of modules AMD has stated are compatible, but as with any QVL it's not all inclusive.

https://www.amd.com/system/files/2017-06/am4-motherboard-memory-support-list-en_0.pdf


Yes, it's not a guarantee that the modules won't work together if you buy an identical module a year later, but as I pointed out in the image posted above, even buying the same exact part number two weeks later is no guarantee of getting the same part either. There is only one way to assure that you will get two identical modules, which greatly increases the chances they will be compatible, and that is to get them together. It is not the ONLY way to do so though. Many people add memory down the road without issue. Many end up with major problems trying to find compatible memory as well. It is a crapshoot, like I said.

There is a list at the following link that MOSTLY tells you what the specific configurations of a number of given part numbers offers, but it also is not all inclusive and as I showed you above, there are clearly instances where the same part number can change between production runs into something totally different and potentially not compatible even with a previous version of itself.

https://www.reddit.com/r/Amd/comments/62vp2g/clearing_up_any_samsung_bdie_confusion_eg_on/?st=jc3v4k51&sh=05007976


Also, rather than that much older Antec true power classic that uses an older Seasonic platform inside that was already fairly dated when Seasonic started building these for Antec years ago. It's also not modular. Not even semi-modular. The build quality and performance of the Truepower classic is without question high, but there are much newer platforms with just as high quality, that use newer tech and are not group regulated, plus have modularity and are cheaper. This would be a FAR better choice.

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Power Supply: SeaSonic - FOCUS Plus Gold 550W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply ($79.59 @ SuperBiiz)
Total: $79.59
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2018-01-06 16:35 EST-0500

 

NKR 8055

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I hear you loud and clear and what youre saying actually makes alot of sense. so ill go over a few concerns one more time and ill tell you what im going to do.

first of. as stated above, i chose one stick of 16Gb rather than 2 8gb because either way i would still like to upgrade my ram later on. so its either one 16Gb now and an additional 16gb in a year or a set of 2 x 8gb now and the same in a year...

although the two 8gb would be faster. i would like to keep some ram slots available for a time in the distant future where i may need more than 32Gb of ram.... basically i want the most ram in as little slots for the sake of future upgrades. also it would be ideal to buy dual channel 32Gb memory right now but my budget prohibits that.

is my reasoning valid or am i missing something? again this is my VERY first build so i may be missing simple points in my planning.

With regards to the power supply. i chose this one based on the toms psu list 2.0 and i checked it against the psu's on two sites:

mwave.com.au
umart.com.au

i chose this psu because of budget and i decided to go for seasonic internals as ive seen that psu's with seasonic internals are highly recommended on the forums. If by any chance you have the time to check out what is on those two sites and recommend mea psu that is of better or the same quality for cheaper, i will go for that option regardless of what internals it has.

Thank you for all your help. much appreciated.
I do apologies if at any time it seems that im not following your advice completely, its just that as this is my first build and id like to be 100% sure of everything i do.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Do you run virtual machines, high end CAD software for very large projects or for some reason plan to configure a massive RAMdisk?



Taking a closer look at that power supply, that is NOT the older non-Haswell compliant group regulated model. It is the newer (Still older though) unit and it IS a DC-DC design. The only issue I have with it is that it is not at least semi-modular and reviews suggest that under heavy loads the fan is qiute noisy at 52db, but if you can live with that then it's a solid unit.

At 139.00 the Antec Edge, also built by Seasonic, is a MUCH newer platform and is nearly silent even under heavy loads. It also comes with the same five year warranty as the Truepower classic, so while there's no advantage there to be had the Edge IS modular, quieter and it's newer platform likely offers a few newer protections although I didn't specifically look into this as I don't usually gravitate toward the Antec products anymore because generally they're not less expensive than what you can get an actual Seasonic for here in the US.

IN any case, might want to at least take a look at that unit if the extra forty bucks is worth the quieter operation and modularity to you.

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Power Supply: Antec - EDGE 550W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply ($139.00 @ Umart)
Total: $139.00
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2018-01-08 19:37 AEDT+1100
 

NKR 8055

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I plan on Running programs such as Solidworks, Archicad, AutoCAD and a few other rendering programs. the machine will also be used for some mild gaming ( GTA V and Need for speed payback).

About the psu, i have considered the Antec Edge. The TPS according to toms psu list is "essentially a non modular version of the EDGE".. a while back i looked into the advantages of modular psu and according to forums its mostly for cosmetic purposes... Although i would love to choose the EDGE, i have chosen to sacrifice the "luxury" of low noise and modularity so that i could save the 40 bucks for (what i would think) are more important factors such as the gpu or ram.

i hope what im saying makes sense. if by any chance i can pull out the extra 40 bucks i would gladly take your advice and choose the EDGE.

p.s im already 40 (australian) bucks over my budget lol.
 

Darkbreeze

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Moderator
Makes total sense. I just always like to offer ALL of the options, on the table so to speak.

As for the programs you plan to run, I've used Solidworks, AutoCAD and many others, many times, albeit on smaller projects, nothing like a full commercial building or complex mechanism, but even so I've never had any issues with only my current 16GB, BUT, I can fully understand your desire to allow yourself the possibility of fully utilizing the allowable memory. I have several friends/clients whom I've built seriously high end Solidworks/CAD machines for and have generally allowed for 32GB on those machines.

Those guys have informed me that, and they DO full scale large projects and complex design work, they rarely see usage over 18GB or so, but again, your machine, your money, so your preferences. I personally think that 2 x8GB now (IF that's how you need to do it) and another 2 x8GB later, will be more than you'll be likely to ever need for the life of this particular machine, but again, that's just my own mindset and doesn't necessarily mean much in the bigger picture. It's possible you'll be doing things that I or these other folks have not and that you WILL need more memory.

Generally though I've only really found a need for more than 32GB on machines that were running VMs or especially if they're running VMs WITH some kind of high end graphics or CAD application.

Either way, I think you'll be good to go with what you've selected but I think I would try to source a memory product known to have better compatibility with Ryzen, something that utilizes a B-die Samsung IC, and those Corsair LPX modules do not the last time I checked.
 

NKR 8055

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im going to start looking for another RAM set that utilizes B-die Samsung IC, thank you for that bit of info as i never knew such a thing even existed.
i have until the 16th of february to finalize my parts list.
i work for an engineering company and my instructions come from a city thats 2.5hrs away from me. oftentimes i find myself having to use teamviewer to communicate to my superiors, does this count as "VM?".
im also going to re look at the RAM compatibility of my cpu, and that of a ryzen 5 (incase i upgrade to that in time to come). what im looking to see is will i reach the full ram support of the cpu if i use 8gb memory or will i end up filling up my slots and not fully utilize the cpus compatibility. i hope this makes sense.
if i can use 8gb memory sticks and still max out the maximum memory of the cpu then i will go for the 2 x 8gb config right away.
 

NKR 8055

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Ive just been on the AMD site and ive noticed something strange (probably because my knowledge is limited)

ive been looking at the ryzen 5 1600X (i wouldnt buy a processor any higher than this).
according to the site, under memory channels it shows "2'.
does this mean that these processors dont support quad channel memory?
if so, wouldnt it be not such a good idea to use 8gb sticks whereas with the 16gb sticks i would be getting more seeing as i wont be going more than 2 sticks on the machine?

 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Teamviewer, no. Very little overhead using TV. VMs are actual, completely independent operating system instances that run inside a sandbox so to speak. It's an emulation of an operating system, installed IN the operating system you are running, but totally separate. You have to allocate memory to it, independent from the memory your machine is running on. So for example, if you have a system with 16GB and you need your virtual system to have 8GB, then your ACTUAL operating system is only left with 8GB of functional memory at it's disposal.

That's why people running VMs need a lot of memory. Often, 32GB is pretty standard so that the system can have 16GB but 16GB can be given to the VM operating system.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Virtual_machine


Yes, Ryzen does not support quad channel memory. MOST systems do not support quad channel memory. Most consumer hardware with four DIMM slots only have support for dual channel memory although there are some few platforms with both triple and quad channel as well.

AMD Ryzen Threadripper supports quad channel. Most of the Intel X platforms support quad channel.

https://www.pcworld.com/article/2982965/components/quad-channel-ram-vs-dual-channel-ram-the-shocking-truth-about-their-performance.html?page=4


Bottom line for quad channel is, if you want quad channel, you are going to need a vastly more expensive CPU and motherboard that supports it. Mainstream and most enthusiast chipsets do not.
 

NKR 8055

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okay thank you for clearing that up for me. ive decided to consider 8Gb sticks again.
i have just one more request please;
After searching for Ram with the specification (B die samsung) you mentioned. i decided to look at
the other options within my budget. both 1 x 16 and 2 x 8.
i found one kit with a single 16GB stick and 11 dual stick kits



If the single 16Gb stick doesnt utilize B die samsung IC's, woud you please be so kind as to select one of the other Ram kits below for me?
i cant tell if any of the ram kits utilize that type of IC because i cant find the exact same terms in the spec sheet.
youre help would be greatly appreciated


1 x 16GB
https://www.mwave.com.au/product/kingston-hyperx-fury-16gb-1x-16gb-ddr4-2666mhz-memory-red-ac03545#detailTabs=tabOverview


2 x 8GB
https://www.mwave.com.au/product/team-tforce-dark-16gb-2x-8gb-ddr4-3000mhz-memory-gray-ac05946
https://www.mwave.com.au/product/avexir-impact-rog-certified-16gb-2x-8gb-ddr4-2666mhz-memory-ab94907
https://www.umart.com.au/GeIL-16GB-Kit--2x8GB-GLW416GB3000C16DC-DDR4-Super-LUCE-C16-3000MHz-Black-Heatsink-White-Led_39863G.html
https://www.umart.com.au/Kingston-16GB---2-x-8GB-KINHX426C15FBK2-16-2666MHz-DDR4-Non-ECC-CL15-DIMM-HyperX-FURY-Black-Series_33095G.html
https://www.umart.com.au/G-Skill-RIPJAWS-V-16GB-KIT-8GBX2-F4-3000C15D-16GVRB-DDR4-3000MHZ-1-35V_36805G.html
https://www.umart.com.au/G-Skill-RIPJAWS-V-16GB-KIT-8GBX2-DDR4-3000MHZ-1-35V_36804G.html
https://www.umart.com.au/Corsair-16GB--2x8GB--CMU16GX4M2C3000C15R-DDR4-3000MHz-Red-LED_35670G.html
https://www.umart.com.au/Kingston-HyperX-Predator-HX432C16PB3K2-16-DDR4-16GB--2x8GB--3200MHz-CL16-DIMM-XMP-Ready_39038G.html
https://www.umart.com.au/GeIL-16GB-Kit--2x8GB--DDR4-EVO-X-RGB-LED-Dual-Channel-C15-3000MHz_39051G.html
https://www.umart.com.au/Corsair-16GB--2x8GB--CMR16GX4M2A2666C16-DDR4-2666MHz-Vengeance-RGB_38958G.html
https://www.umart.com.au/Corsair-16GB--2x8GB--CMU16GX4M2A2666C16-DDR4-2666MHz-White-LED_35652G.html
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
These are the least expensive memory modules using Samsung B-Die ICs I can find for sale in Australia. While I AM biased towards G.Skill, the Corsair Dominator series modules are exemplary modules of very good quality, and these DO have the B-dies.

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Memory: Corsair - Dominator Platinum 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR4-3000 Memory ($315.00 @ IJK)
Total: $315.00
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2018-01-09 19:06 AEDT+1100



Also available at Umart.

https://www.umart.com.au/newsite/goods.php?id=33384
 

NKR 8055

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so none of the memory modules in my list are B-Die?.
looks like ive got extra bucks to fork out.
Thank you for all your help. ill PM you to let you know how it goes

 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Unless I missed one, which is possible, and I only compared them to the Reddit list which is about the only resource I could find that does show the majority of B-die modules.

Also worth mentioning that they don't HAVE to be B-die modules. B-die modules are always more expensive because the chips are more expensive, but as it seems that recent bios updates have improved compatibility with a lot of less than top shelf modules, you might be able to get by with a less expensive module. It does somewhat open things up to potentially more "hit or miss" though.

If you don't mind dropping down to 2400mhz modules, which might have a minor performance hit due to the lower speed but probably not as much s lacking dual channel operation would, then these FlareX modules which are designed FOR use with Ryzen systems is an option too, and is considerably less expensive.

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Memory: G.Skill - Flare X 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR4-2400 Memory ($255.00 @ Umart)
Total: $255.00
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2018-01-10 10:39 AEDT+1100
 

NKR 8055

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i've opted to go with that corsair dominator you suggested. i'd like to just be safe because i can only buy again in a year or so (i live in south africa and rely on family traveling to and from aus).

Thanks alot for all your help and very insightful info. i learnt alot. ill be sure to update you via a PM.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Ah, I see. You guys are aware of the Meltdown and Spectre vulnerabilities yes? You are aware that primarily the performance hits being seen are on storage, particularly NVME and SSD storage? Just thought I'd mention that so you could look into it as we talked pretty extensively about the NVME drive and it's performance benefits on that thread. With up to a 40% hit on file access performance depending on the application or workload it might really be worth reading up on that.

If you haven't already, might be a really good idea to read ALL the way through the commentary as a lot of additional information is added or addressed in the entire four pages.

http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/id-3609004/cpu-security-vulnerabilities-information.html

 

NKR 8055

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i've seen mentions of it here and there but i just assumed it wouldnt affect me "much"...a bit ignorant i know lol. but thank you for the heads up. ill be sure to look into it soon.
if i have any questions ill post it right here on the thread. but ill try and understand it as much as i can.
thank you again
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Anytime. Honestly, if the systems in use are well protected from malware and code exploits in the first place, there may not be a terrific reason to install the patches and new firmware to start with. Unfortunately Microsoft and most of the board partners have taken most of that choice out of our hands to begin with. My suggestion would be to allow the Windows updates but NOT install the updated firmware that specifically targets these vulnerabilities. Most if not all of the boards currently in circulation have several bios updates available with good reasons to install them, so maybe just update to whatever the last version BEFORE the exploit patched firmware version is.

The Windows patch doesn't seem to give a major hit on performance, but combined with the firmware it does, on some workloads.
 

NKR 8055

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so basically its a virus?

sorry for the blonde question its just that i havent got the chance to read up on it as yet. im still at work. its only 11:32 AM here in S.A.

im not sure how often the systems are updated here at work. but ive submited the various options for the computer. they might end up buying it here in south aftrica so that it can be assembled, software installed and stress tested all under one roof. as opposed to buying the parts from australia and then looking for someone to assemble etc etc. also when buying the stuff from overseas you sacrifice the warranty ( a chance im taking with my own personal build).

again about the malware. at work we use an antivirus called ESSET. on my personal laptop i use microsoft security essentials which im just assuming is good enough for me because i dont use torrents etc. but on the new rig ill be installing a better antivirus because most (if not all) of my softwares will be from torrent sites.( in which case ill seek your advice once again).

On my personal rig with regards to updates before i start using the machine it will be updated fully. the bios the windows etc etc. even if the updates take a week i wont start using until all updates are finished .

ill read up on the malware soon as i get a chance

 

NKR 8055

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"My suggestion would be to allow the Windows updates but NOT install the updated firmware that specifically targets these vulnerabilities."

BTW. how do i install windows updates and exclude the "updated firmware" you mentioned/ is it a totally seperate update that i can identify and decline?
ive got a laptop and a personal computer at the moment that ill be updating later today after your advice regarding the malware
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
If your company has an "antivirus" program, they are in deep shit. There haven't been any actual "viruses" around in ten or fifteen years. At least, not actively. These days it's all "malware", including trojans, root kits, adware, code exploits, etc. They need to get systems up to date with modern protections, not antivirus programs from fifteen years ago.

I recommend either Malwarebytes or Spybot search and destroy. The Spybot subscription is a lot cheaper at about 15 USD per year while Malwarebytes is a bit better program but runs about 49.99 per year USD. Should have some kind of Malware protection installed IN ADDITION to real time antivirus OR something that does both like Malwarebytes does.

Firmware would have to be manually downloaded and manually installed, so as long as you don't update the motherboard firmware (BIOS) to a version that is newer than Jan 1 of this year, you should be fine. Probably a good idea to update to whatever version prior to that, that is available though for CPU and memory performance and compatibility improvements.


If you run software from torrent sites, you better create and be prepared to use backups on a regular basis because they are virtually all full of malware, and unfortunately on that note, by rule, I now have to close this thread because we are not permitted to allow discussions to continue where use of pirated or torrented software is involved. If you have further questions you'll need to ask them in a new thread or the other thread I helped you in previously. Sorry, but rules are rules.
 
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