[SOLVED] AMD Ryzen 3700x vs INTEL Core i7 10700F - Which one do you think?

MonsterMMORPG

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I can't decide which system to go

Intel has 1 advantage for me that I won't be have to rebuild my Raid 1 array

I will use the system for applications that uses 8 cores 16 threads (not for gaming)

As far as I searched the Internet both CPU have equal power

So which one and why?


System 1 : 783$ (Turkey price)


CPU : INTEL Core i7 10700F : 373$ :
https://www.vatanbilgisayar.com/intel-core-i7-10700f-soket-1200-10-nesil-3-30ghz-6mb-onbellek-14nm-islemci.html

MB : ASUS PRIME B460M-A Intel B460 LGA1200 DDR4 2933 : 110$ :
https://www.amazon.com.tr/PRIME-B460M-LGA1200-USB3-2-Deste%C4%9Fi/dp/B088W88N1P

Ram : 2x CORSAIR CMK32GX4M2D3200C16 VENGEANCE LPX 32GB : 300$ :
https://www.amazon.com.tr/gp/product/B072FLGN4V/ref=ox_sc_act_title_1?smid=A1UNQM1SR2CHM


System 2 : 791$ (Turkey price)

CPU : AMD Ryzen 7 3700X : 372$ :
https://www.amazon.com.tr/AMD-Ryzen-3700X-4-4GHz-%C4%B0%C5%9Flemci/dp/B07SXMZLPK

MB : MSI B450 TOMAHAWK MAX Amd B450 : 119$ :
https://www.vatanbilgisayar.com/msi-b450-tomahawk-max-am4-amd-ryzen-ddr4-4133-mhz-o-c-usb3-1-anakart.html

Ram : 2x CORSAIR CMK32GX4M2D3200C16 VENGEANCE LPX 32GB : 300$ :
https://www.amazon.com.tr/gp/product/B072FLGN4V/ref=ox_sc_act_title_1?smid=A1UNQM1SR2CHM
 
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I have seen on the internet that when all core is used 3700x can go max 3800 MHZ on some occasions
...
What you think?
I think you're getting bad information. But then, people who don't understand how Ryzen systems work try to 'fix' them end up breaking it. Methods they've used on Intel, like all-core overclocking or undervolting, frequently result in lowered peak clocks and reduced performance.

My 3700X regularly hits 4400Mhz single core peak clocks and runs around 4250-4350Mhz sustained in moderately heavy all-core workloads (handbrake encoding, Folding@Home). It also stays well above 4100Mhz on extremely heavy workloads...like Prime 95 small FFT which is unrealistic and only a stress test. Newer CPU's built on the mature 7nm process do even better.

Also, Ryzen's way to dynamic to look at as a single clock as it's constantly changing. And very opportunistic: it boosts to a high clock based on thermal headroom only when it needs then quickly idles back when it doesn't. That's why it's so energy efficient, so long as you don't attempt an all core overclock of course. You really have to compare based on performance, not simple Mhz.

I also think that if someone wants a system that will remain relevant for 5 years they're probably better off going with a 5800X or 5900X. Zen 4 (5th gen Ryzen) will be coming along in 1 1/2 years, as well as 6th gen after that. Intel's got to have something in work that will bear fruit too. With competition as strong as it is now I have to think things are going to change drastically way before 5 years are up. But you are at the budget limit: at least you will be able to upgrade to a Ryzen 5000 well before then on a B450 as the Tomahawk is certain to get a BIOS for one.
 
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I have to think that if performance is essentially the same the benefit of not rebuilding your RAID array would make the difference.

However, there's also something to be said for 'future proofing'. We know the 3700x can be well improved on by a 5800x in the exact same socket and motherboard. So if that's a consideration would it make the RAID rebuilding a bit less bothersome?

And if that IS a consideration I'd suggest looking at a B550 motherboard which will work even better with the newer CPU when the time comes. But that brings with it a higher price tag; maybe $50 more, depending.
 
Is there a 5600X option at possibly a lesser price? (The 5600X's increased IPC have it equaling most older 8 cores in editing/encoding functions).

If going Intel, I'd look for a KF or K variant, if available...(yes, it requires a cooler)
 

MonsterMMORPG

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I have to think that if performance is essentially the same the benefit of not rebuilding your RAID array would make the difference.

However, there's also something to be said for 'future proofing'. We know the 3700x can be well improved on by a 5800x in the exact same socket and motherboard. So if that's a consideration would it make the RAID rebuilding a bit less bothersome?

And if that IS a consideration I'd suggest looking at a B550 motherboard which will work even better with the newer CPU when the time comes. But that brings with it a higher price tag; maybe $50 more, depending.
Thanks for suggestions

I don't plan to upgrade CPU anytime soon after purchase (at least 5 years)

I have seen on the internet that when all core is used 3700x can go max 3800 MHZ on some occasions

On the internet 10700f is said to reach 4600 MHZ on all core usage but I couldn't find any tests

What you think?
 

MonsterMMORPG

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May 16, 2016
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Is there a 5600X option at possibly a lesser price? (The 5600X's increased IPC have it equaling most older 8 cores in editing/encoding functions).

If going Intel, I'd look for a KF or K variant, if available...(yes, it requires a cooler)
5600x is 6 cores, can not possibly catch 3700x or 10700f when I use all 8 cores

By the way I am at my budget limit
 
...
I have seen on the internet that when all core is used 3700x can go max 3800 MHZ on some occasions
...
What you think?
I think you're getting bad information. But then, people who don't understand how Ryzen systems work try to 'fix' them end up breaking it. Methods they've used on Intel, like all-core overclocking or undervolting, frequently result in lowered peak clocks and reduced performance.

My 3700X regularly hits 4400Mhz single core peak clocks and runs around 4250-4350Mhz sustained in moderately heavy all-core workloads (handbrake encoding, Folding@Home). It also stays well above 4100Mhz on extremely heavy workloads...like Prime 95 small FFT which is unrealistic and only a stress test. Newer CPU's built on the mature 7nm process do even better.

Also, Ryzen's way to dynamic to look at as a single clock as it's constantly changing. And very opportunistic: it boosts to a high clock based on thermal headroom only when it needs then quickly idles back when it doesn't. That's why it's so energy efficient, so long as you don't attempt an all core overclock of course. You really have to compare based on performance, not simple Mhz.

I also think that if someone wants a system that will remain relevant for 5 years they're probably better off going with a 5800X or 5900X. Zen 4 (5th gen Ryzen) will be coming along in 1 1/2 years, as well as 6th gen after that. Intel's got to have something in work that will bear fruit too. With competition as strong as it is now I have to think things are going to change drastically way before 5 years are up. But you are at the budget limit: at least you will be able to upgrade to a Ryzen 5000 well before then on a B450 as the Tomahawk is certain to get a BIOS for one.
 
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LeiHeJun

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Dec 13, 2020
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I don't plan to upgrade CPU anytime soon after purchase (at least 5 years)

I have seen on the internet that when all core is used 3700x can go max 3800 MHZ on some occasions

On the internet 10700f is said to reach 4600 MHZ on all core usage but I couldn't find any tests
3700x max goes 4.4GHz
it is 30% faster than 10700F
https://technical.city/en/cpu/Ryzen-7-3700X-vs-Core-i7-10700F

See max boost clock 4.4:
https://www.amd.com/en/products/cpu/amd-ryzen-7-3700x

I think you're getting bad information. But then, people who don't understand how Ryzen systems work try to 'fix' them end up breaking it. Methods they've used on Intel, like all-core overclocking or undervolting, frequently result in lowered peak clocks and reduced performance.

My 3700X regularly hits 4400Mhz single core peak clocks .....
 

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