News AMD Ryzen 4000 Pro APUs Pricing Leak: 8-Core Zen 2 APU Listed Around $300

Jul 6, 2020
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Can we clarify, please? Ingram Micro is a distributor, not a retailer. They don't sell to end-users, or if they now DO, I need to update my knowledge. I discarded them as a supplier more than 20 years ago.
 
$300 for 8/16 cores is not surprising if you think about it. The iGPU takes a lot of space. This is also a monolithic die. And a Ryzen 3700 x is like $280. (And the later would be cheaper because mcm's are cheaper to produce over a monolithic die.)

I don't think there will be much of a market for this however. I think 6/12 core is the most people will be willing to invest in an APU because you can buy a $100 card and get significantly faster performance.
 
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InvalidError

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I don't think there will be much of a market for this however. I think 6/12 core is the most people will be willing to invest in an APU because you can buy a $100 card and get significantly faster performance.
I'd imagine the main market for 8c16t with IGP is office PCs where the cores may be needed for zippy responsiveness across the entire seat's sofwate suite and graphics are mostly-don't-care. May also be useful for home/low-end servers where you may need the cores for processing power and want an IGP for compact size and low power.

There is no shortage of uses for a reasonably priced 8c16t APU if you expand your horizon beyond the DIY desktop market.
 
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I'd imagine the main market for 8c16t with IGP is office PCs where the cores may be needed for zippy responsiveness across the entire seat's sofwate suite and graphics are mostly-don't-care. May also be useful for home/low-end servers where you may need the cores for processing power and want an IGP for compact size and low power.

There is no shortage of uses for a reasonably priced 8c16t APU if you expand your horizon beyond the DIY desktop market.
I would say you are right about office computers and laptops. But AMD has sadly had problems making inroads here.

As to small form factor pc's well thats another good idea. But 4/8 threads is good enough for router boxes or nas storage for a small office up to 20 people. And if you want to stream with plex to multiple people, you should intel quick sync.

Im hoping for AMD. Maybe the 8 core would be good for student school laptops in the $750-$900 range. AMD seems to be making inroads here at least.
 
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Titan
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As to small form factor pc's well thats another good idea. But 4/8 threads is good enough for router boxes or nas storage for a small office up to 20 people.
Some people run things like Minecraft servers. If I had a Ryzen 4750G NUC, I would probably end up using it to replace my living room PC and make it do double-duty as a development box that I can SSH into.

Once you open the home server can of worms, there is an infinite number of extra possibilities.
 
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dyils

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I would say you are right about office computers and laptops. But AMD has sadly had problems making inroads here.

As to small form factor pc's well thats another good idea. But 4/8 threads is good enough for router boxes or nas storage for a small office up to 20 people. And if you want to stream with plex to multiple people, you should intel quick sync.

Im hoping for AMD. Maybe the 8 core would be good for student school laptops in the $750-$900 range. AMD seems to be making inroads here at least.
There are plenty of things that don't require strong graphics. Personally, I'm gonna use it for both of the below.
  • Developer PC - Why pay for a GPU if I'm compiling code all day? All I need is a good CPU and SSD
  • Streaming PC for gamers (in dual PC setups) - currently the 2700x and 3700x are excellent streaming CPUs except you still need a GPU. With this, you won't even need that for encoding streams.
 
I'd imagine the main market for 8c16t with IGP is office PCs where the cores may be needed for zippy responsiveness across the entire seat's sofwate suite and graphics are mostly-don't-care. May also be useful for home/low-end servers where you may need the cores for processing power and want an IGP for compact size and low power.

There is no shortage of uses for a reasonably priced 8c16t APU if you expand your horizon beyond the DIY desktop market.
Also nice for developers who run Virtual Box or Hyper-V VMs on their desktop for testing.
 

Chung Leong

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I don't think there will be much of a market for this however. I think 6/12 core is the most people will be willing to invest in an APU because you can buy a $100 card and get significantly faster performance.
An extra component is an extra failure point. Video cards do have a nasty tendency to fail after only a few years of use. Where longevity matters, integrated graphics is a better choice. You would also want as much performance as you can afford, so the machine is more capable of running software of tomorrow.
 

InvalidError

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Video cards do have a nasty tendency to fail after only a few years of use.
All of my GPUs have outlived their useful life. I replaced my HD5770 when AMD axed driver support for it, still got a ~12 years old HD3650 in my living room PC. Thought it died when the PC quit booting a few months ago, turned out it was just the dead RTC/CMOS battery.
 
An extra component is an extra failure point. Video cards do have a nasty tendency to fail after only a few years of use. Where longevity matters, integrated graphics is a better choice. You would also want as much performance as you can afford, so the machine is more capable of running software of tomorrow.
Im not arguing that. Im arguing the target market is limited. If you professionally code 99% youre getting intel. Thats because intel has a stranglehold on business laptops. (That is IF a mobile version comes with 8/16 APU exist). Everyone gets a laptop these days except game developers. Even me as a chief engineer.

Home coders, i do have respect for ya. How many of us are there though that wouldnt go the extra mile with a dGPU?

All my personal dev boxes were full tilt high end hardware. Since the high end cpu is there already it made more sense to and add a dgpu than building gaming box and more than doubling my cost.
 
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Chung Leong

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Im not arguing that. Im arguing the target market is limited. If you professionally code 99% youre getting intel. Thats because intel has a stranglehold on business laptops. (That is IF a mobile version comes with 8/16 APU exist). Everyone gets a laptop these days except game developers. Even me as a chief engineer.
The school market is sizable. That's one of those markets where longevity matters. 8C/16T might be overkill today but might be bare minimum 10 years later. Sometimes it could take that long before money is available again for upgrades.
 
Im not arguing that. Im arguing the target market is limited. If you professionally code 99% youre getting intel. Thats because intel has a stranglehold on business laptops. (That is IF a mobile version comes with 8/16 APU exist). Everyone gets a laptop these days except game developers. Even me as a chief engineer.

Home coders, i do have respect for ya. How many of us are there though that wouldnt go the extra mile with a dGPU?

All my personal dev boxes were full tilt high end hardware. Since the high end cpu is there already it made more sense to and add a dgpu than building gaming box and more than doubling my cost.
Unless you are coding on the go, I don't know any developer who's primary computer is a laptop. While you can add a larger screen and better keyboard, having a desktop for that is much easier.
 
Unless you are coding on the go, I don't know any developer who's primary computer is a laptop. While you can add a larger screen and better keyboard, having a desktop for that is much easier.
The vast majority of "Large" businesses do give laptops to developers for the following reasons:

  1. You don't have to buy two machines for developers. One to take to meeting, and one to work at a desk
  2. You have less configurations to support
  3. And most important: Laptops are always done on lease and they hold their value a lot better than traditional desktops. So the lease rates come out more favorable for laptops, especially when purchased in bulk.
While I agree with your sentiment (and I wish I had a desktop at my desk) , unless you have a specific need like a server, or dGPU work (games/AI), then you are likely getting a laptop at any sizeable company.
 

Chung Leong

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Unless you are coding on the go, I don't know any developer who's primary computer is a laptop. While you can add a larger screen and better keyboard, having a desktop for that is much easier.
Depends on whether you're old enough to remember spinning disk drives :). Coding on laptops used to be a miserable experience.
 

ron baker

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I would say you are right about office computers and laptops. But AMD has sadly had problems making inroads here.

As to small form factor pc's well thats another good idea. But 4/8 threads is good enough for router boxes or nas storage for a small office up to 20 people. And if you want to stream with plex to multiple people, you should intel quick sync.

Im hoping for AMD. Maybe the 8 core would be good for student school laptops in the $750-$900 range. AMD seems to be making inroads here at least.
These chips already exist in laptops tho , dont they .. desktop is last to get them.
fancy one of these simly as its the latest silicon and thus will be better fabbed so I can undervolt it to 0.5v (6c ) ..or get the 35w version...
 

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