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Question AMD Ryzen 7 3700X system

ultrarunner100

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Hey guys;
I apologize in advance for the long post...

I have been working on my new build for about a week now, but still don't have anything except the CPU set in stone.
I am going with the AMD Ryzen 7 3700X.
I thought I had a parts list set (on PC Parts Picker), but after doing some more research, I'm re-configuring just about everything.
For one thing, I have too much information to process (in my head, not on the PC!)
So let me list the components I have chosen in one build proposal:

CPU: AMD Ryzen 7 3700X
Mobo: MSI B450 Tomahawk Max
RAM: G.Skill Ripjaws V 32GB (2x 16GB) DDR4 3600 (CAS = 18)
Storage: Samsung 970 EVO 1TB M.2 2280 NVME SSD (for OS & programs)
Storage: Samsung 860 EVO 1TB 2.5" SATA SSD (for file storage)
Video: NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2070 Super 8GB
Case: Fractal Design Meshify C ATX Mid-Tower (no glass)
PSU: Corsair RM (2019) 750W 80+ Gold Certified Fully Modular ATX (I know I don't need 750W, but...)
Fans: 2ea Noctua NF-P14s redux-1200 PWM 140mm (for the front of the case). I will keep the supplied 120mm in the rear.

This list seemed all OK, until I dug deeper into the memory.
I was researching CAS timing, and eventually checked the G.Skill Ripjaws V on Amazon, and read in the description 'Intel'.
That got me thinking. Why is this kit specified for Intel?
I dug deeper, including a thread here, and it does appear that some kits don't work so well with AMD Ryzen series due to the AMD needing tighter timing specs.
I think the G.Skill Trident series was the one recommended for Ryzen. It is more expensive, but not by much.
Continuing with the memory kit, I'm trying to figure whether there is an advantage to buying 3200 vs 3600, and so far it doesn't look like much of a difference. From what I read, it's not just the speed, but the CAS timing as well.
I am not planning to overclock.

Next, there's the question of whether I should go with the MSI B450 Tomahawk Max or one of the MSI X470 boards.
The most prominent difference I can see between the B450 and X470 is that the X470 has two M.2 slots.
Would there be any advantage at all to having 2x M.2 and 1x M.2 and 1x SATA drives, assuming the ones I listed above?
I think the X470 also has more USB 3.0 ports, but most of my peripherals are still USB2. So either board has enough USB 3.0 ports to suit my current (and probably future) needs.

I know there is a lot of great info here on Tom's Hardware; That's where I have been researching most. But there are some things I don't quite grasp when talking about performance.
Funny thing is that, for the kind of games I want to play, I hardly think any of this is going to make a difference. But I am concerned about the memory issue.

Thanks for your help
Ultrarunner
 
Biggest questions are what country are you in, budget in local currency, primary use of the system (gaming, photo editing, etc...), if gaming what types of games are you playing and at what resolution & refresh rate, how quiet do you want the system to be, and how small do you want the system to be?

From everything you have listed there I can see a lot of wasted money. There is no reason to use SSD for file storage in a home computer. Movies, music, and photos won't see a difference from HDD to SSD. Also you can get a 2TB NVMe drive that has almost identical perfomance to the 970 EVO for almost $100 less than the 860 & 970 combined cost. You for sure don't need a 750W PSU, but right now with the cost of PSUs for some reason you can find good quality 750s for about the same price or cheaper than the 650W. There is no reason to go with an X470 motherboard on a Ryzen 3000 system. You only pay a few dollars more for a X570 compared to the X470 so you just go with the X570 at that point. Going with the X570 vs the B450 just allows you to have more storage options. AFAIK all X570 motherboards have 2x NVMe M.2 slots. That allows you more expansion for the future. For the RAM Ryzen does love fast RAM and you can get better performance going with higher speed, but you have to look at the price/performance ratio. Is it worth it to spend an extra 20% on RAM for 2% better performance? Ideally you want to go with at least DDR4-3200MHz RAM with the 3000 series. Yes the timings do make a difference, but again is it worth it to spend 75% more for DDR4-3200 CAS14 and 2% better performance than DDR4-3200 CAS16? The 2070 Super is a great GPU, but will going RX 5700XT make a difference in the games you play? The 5700XT offers 92-95% the performance of the 2070 Super for 66% the price.
 

ultrarunner100

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You're probably right about my wasting money on components I don't need. I think I'm getting caught up in all the information I have read over the past week.
I'm going to re-think the project. So far, I've spent only time, not money on this.
 
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helper800

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You're probably right about my wasting money on components I don't need. I think I'm getting caught up in all the information I have read over the past week.
I'm going to re-think the project. So far, I've spent only time, not money on this.
Something like this would serve you very well. For RAM and the 3000 series Ryzen CPUs, you want 3600mhz if it's not too much more than 3200. Typically you can get 3600 RAM with timings the same or slightly slower than the 3200 kits. It seems that RAM speed > Tight timings performance-wise for applications and games. I will also never buy another HDD again for storage because of how cheap it is now.

PCPartPicker Part List

CPU: AMD Ryzen 7 3700X 3.6 GHz 8-Core Processor ($294.14 @ Amazon)
Motherboard: MSI B450 TOMAHAWK MAX ATX AM4 Motherboard ($114.99 @ B&H)
Memory: G.Skill Ripjaws V 32 GB (4 x 8 GB) DDR4-3600 Memory ($172.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: HP EX950 1 TB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive ($147.99 @ Amazon)
Storage: ADATA SU760 1 TB 2.5" Solid State Drive ($99.99 @ Amazon)
Video Card: Sapphire Radeon RX 5700 XT 8 GB NITRO+ Video Card ($433.98 @ Newegg)
Case: NZXT H510 ATX Mid Tower Case ($69.98 @ Amazon)
Power Supply: SeaSonic FOCUS Plus Gold 750 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply ($114.99 @ B&H)
Case Fan: Noctua NF-A14 industrialPPC-2000 PWM 107.41 CFM 140 mm Fan ($27.95 @ Amazon)
Case Fan: Noctua NF-A14 industrialPPC-2000 PWM 107.41 CFM 140 mm Fan ($27.95 @ Amazon)
Total: $1504.95
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2020-04-19 00:31 EDT-0400
 
I would do something like this:
PCPartPicker Part List

CPU: AMD Ryzen 7 3700X 3.6 GHz 8-Core Processor ($294.14 @ Amazon)
CPU Cooler: ARCTIC Freezer 34 eSports DUO CPU Cooler ($42.33 @ Amazon)
Motherboard: ASRock X570 Pro4 ATX AM4 Motherboard ($153.99 @ Newegg)
Memory: OLOy 32 GB (2 x 16 GB) DDR4-3600 Memory ($137.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: ADATA XPG SX8200 Pro 2 TB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive ($259.99 @ Amazon)
Storage: Seagate Barracuda Compute 2 TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($50.99 @ Amazon)
Video Card: XFX Radeon RX 5700 XT 8 GB THICC III Ultra Video Card ($409.99 @ B&H)
Case: Fractal Design Meshify C ATX Mid Tower Case ($92.98 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: EVGA SuperNOVA G3 650 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply ($127.98 @ Newegg)
Case Fan: Fractal Design X2 GP-12 (Black) 52.3 CFM 120 mm Fan ($12.99 @ Amazon)
Total: $1583.37
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2020-04-19 08:58 EDT-0400
 
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helper800

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Is there an advantage to RAM config 4x8 compared to 2x16, given same speed?
There are clear performance advantages with a 4x8gb kit over a 2x16gb kit.
Not in this case.
Definitely in all cases is there a performance advantage. Please check the bottom of the 2nd page.
https://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/amd-ryzen-3000-best-memory-timings,6310.html
CPU: AMD Ryzen 7 3700X 3.6 GHz 8-Core Processor ($294.14 @ Amazon)
CPU Cooler: ARCTIC Freezer 34 eSports DUO CPU Cooler ($42.33 @ Amazon)
The AMD 3700x comes with a cooler that has about the same performance as this aftermarket one so adding this is just additive cost.
Motherboard: ASRock X570 Pro4 ATX AM4 Motherboard ($153.99 @ Newegg)
He does not need to spend another 40 dollars for an x570 board, however, that is up to him to decide if another m.2 NVMe slot and PCIe 4.0 is worth it to him for future upgrades.
Memory: OLOy 32 GB (2 x 16 GB) DDR4-3600 Memory ($137.99 @ Newegg)
This brand of RAM although cheap comes with terrible customer service if anything happens (personal experience), and has significantly worse timings than the G. skill kit I linked along with the aforementioned less performance as substantiated by the provided link above.
Storage: ADATA XPG SX8200 Pro 2 TB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive ($259.99 @ Amazon)
This is a nice NCMe drive, however, the one I linked just as fast and remains fast as you fill its space because of differing architectures.
Storage: Seagate Barracuda Compute 2 TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($50.99 @ Amazon)
I personally dont think that storage HDDs are even worth buying anymore, however, that is up to him.
Video Card: XFX Radeon RX 5700 XT 8 GB THICC III Ultra Video Card ($409.99 @ B&H)
I have owned 2 XFX THICC cards in my life and on both of them the fans died many, many, many times. I got over 7 new sets of heatsink fan setups from their customer service people because the fans would die ever year.
Power Supply: EVGA SuperNOVA G3 650 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply ($127.98 @ Newegg)
For what it is this PSU is priced higher and of the same or less expected quality as the offerings from Seasonic.
Case Fan: Fractal Design X2 GP-12 (Black) 52.3 CFM 120 mm Fan ($12.99 @ Amazon)
Cheaper fan with half the airflow as Noctua's even though they are practically just as quiet as each other.
 

helper800

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There is USUALLY a penalty. The CPU is a two channel memory controller CPU. It operates at the highest memory clock speeds with 2 DIMMs. Four DIMMs will usually not clock as high.
So you are saying that it does perform better just only when you cannot achieve the same speed it doesn't? Why would we recommend slower configurations just because there is a small chance that the CPU cannot handle the 4x8 3600? Tom's own benchmarks shown here https://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/amd-ryzen-3000-best-memory-timings,6310.html completely contradict that 2x16 kits are faster because 4x8 kits have some sort of "penalty."
 

kanewolf

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So you are saying that it does perform better just only when you cannot achieve the same speed it doesn't? Why would we recommend slower configurations just because there is a small chance that the CPU cannot handle the 4x8 3600? Tom's own benchmarks shown here https://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/amd-ryzen-3000-best-memory-timings,6310.html completely contradict that 2x16 kits are faster because 4x8 kits have some sort of "penalty."
I don't see a comparison of 2x16GB against 4x8GB anywhere in that article. I am just saying that four DIMMs has more capacitance to drive from the memory controller. That can cause the maximum clock that will run stable to be lower when four DIMMs are used.
 

helper800

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I don't see a comparison of 2x16GB against 4x8GB anywhere in that article. I am just saying that four DIMMs has more capacitance to drive from the memory controller. That can cause the maximum clock that will run stable to be lower when four DIMMs are used.
2x8 and 2x16 kits at the same speed and timings perform exactly the same unless the extra memory from 2x16 kit comes into play which in that article it didn't. You can compare a 2x16 kit to a 2x8 kit in this regard:

"Capacity: Does More Memory Perform Better?
As we prepare to compare the performance of two DIMMs to four, we thought we should first show how much performance difference there is between 16GB and 32GB. After all, two DIMMs of today’s main test kit have only 16GB, but four have 32GB. Doing so presents a different problem however, as four single-rank DIMMs will perform differently from two, even when the total capacity is the same.

To get 16GB from the same four ranks as our current 32GB set, we needed memory with identical capability but half the capacity. And since those haven’t been produced for several years, we hopped in the wayback machine and grabbed a set from this 2015 test platform.
Image 1 of 15

Amazingly, 16GB outperformed 32GB when frequency, timings, and the organization of ICs on the circuit board are constant. While we could guess that the memory controller is able to address the lower-capacity ICs more quickly, the more important point was to prove that our benchmarks don’t benefit from having more than 16GB of total capacity.

Benchmarks that typically benefit the most from increased data rates or decreased latencies show less favoritism for the smaller kit. None of our benchmarks are designed for 32GB, and our recommendations for that capacity have primarily focused on multitasking rather than benchmark data."
If you want to see the graphs I defer to the article whence this came.
 
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ultrarunner100

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I'm going to take a different approach: One step at a time, rather than trying to spec out the entire system at once.
First things first:
CPU: I want to go with the AMD Ryzen 7 3700X.
Mobo: I am partial towards MSI (my current 8yr old system has an MSI board and has been running flawlessly the whole time)
I am certain that the B450 chipset would be more than powerful enough for my needs/wants, but the X570 appears to have better memory compatibility. Maybe that's a lot of bunk, but I have done a lot of research, and it appears to me that AMD is much more fussy about RAM timing than Intel.

For example:
I ran the G.Skill RAM configurator:
Motherboard: MSI
Chipset: X570
Model: MPG X570 Gaming Pro Carbon Wifi (I chose this board just for argument sake to run the config)

Next, I narrow the search:
32GB (16x2) (I am assuming the Ryzen 7 3700X / X570 is dual channel and not 4)
Dual Channel Kit
Tested Speed: 3600 MHz, Tested Speed:16-16-16-36 & 16-18-18-38 & 16-19-19-39
The results: 8 of the Trident series, and 1 of the Ripjaws V series; specifically, F4-3600C16D-32VKC (CL16-19-19-39 1.35V)
The Trident series are much more expensive than the Ripjaws V series (at least that is what I've found so far).
So I check the details on the Ripjaw V kit. << maximum compatibility and cutting-edge performance with the latest Intel Core processors <<
That line in the description is what got me concerned about compatibility with AMD in the first place.
I have also done some further research on this, and it does appear that there may be some issues with AMD Ryzen and the Ripjaws V series, as well as some other memory kits.

It would have been helpful if I had found a RAM configurator on the MSI site, but I have not.

I would like to put this issue to rest before moving forward.
Thanks for your help, and your patience.

Ultrarunner
 
2x8 and 2x16 kits at the same speed and timings perform exactly the same unless the extra memory from 2x16 kit comes into play which in that article it didn't. You can compare a 2x16 kit to a 2x8 kit in this regard.
The advantage the 4x8 has over w
There are clear performance advantages with a 4x8gb kit over a 2x16gb kit.

Definitely in all cases is there a performance advantage. Please check the bottom of the 2nd page.
https://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/amd-ryzen-3000-best-memory-timings,6310.html
I have read and used that article myself to show performance differences to people. What you are missing is the reason why 4x8GB has better performance than 2x8GB when both are able to work at the same timings. This is due to the number of Ranks being used. 2x8GB DIMMs, unless you are able to get early 4Gbit RAM chips, are all single rank. That means that you cannot have as much interleaving in the RAM.
"A dual-channel motherboard with two ranks of memory per channel will have four ranks of memory. The problem for current buyers who want their 16GB to be spread across four ranks is that the 4Gb integrated circuits (ICs) that made up those 16GB quad-rank kits are no longer available. Most of today’s DRAM ICs have eight gigabits capacity, so that an eight-chip rank has 8GB capacity and four of those have 32GB capacity. Alternatives include buying very old memory with 4Gb ICs or very cheap memory with 8Gb ICs that have a 16-bit interface (so that four ICs make up a rank). Neither of those alternatives sounds very appealing."
16GB DIMMs are all dual rank so that means you can use 2 DIMMs and get the 4 ranks that you get with a current 4x8GB configuration. Therefore there is no performance penalty going with 2x16GB vs 4x8GB and you are saving a good chunk of money at the same time.
 
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helper800

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The Trident series are much more expensive than the Ripjaws V series (at least that is what I've found so far).
So I check the details on the Ripjaw V kit. << maximum compatibility and cutting-edge performance with the latest Intel Core processors <<
That line in the description is what got me concerned about compatibility with AMD in the first place.
I have also done some further research on this, and it does appear that there may be some issues with AMD Ryzen and the Ripjaws V series, as well as some other memory kits.

It would have been helpful if I had found a RAM configurator on the MSI site, but I have not.

I would like to put this issue to rest before moving forward.
Thanks for your help, and your patience.

Ultrarunner
As far as I am aware if either the RAM company or MOBO company certifies that a specific kit is okay for one another there shouldn't be any issues in this regard. The pickiness of surrounding AMD and RAM was a problem significantly more prevalent with the 1000 and 2000 series CPU's. I have seen a lot fewer issues regarding the 3000 series CPUs. Just because something says, "maximum compatibility and cutting-edge performance with the latest Intel Core processors," It doesn't mean anything in regards to compatibility with AMD's lineups. If you are really concerned about this language you could get a Neo G. Skill kit that is "Made specifically for AMD compatibility."
 
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helper800

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The advantage the 4x8 has over w

I have read and used that article myself to show performance differences to people. What you are missing is the reason why 4x8GB has better performance than 2x8GB when both are able to work at the same timings. This is due to the number of Ranks being used. 2x8GB DIMMs, unless you are able to get early 4Gbit RAM chips, are all single rank. That means that you cannot have as much interleaving in the RAM.
"A dual-channel motherboard with two ranks of memory per channel will have four ranks of memory. The problem for current buyers who want their 16GB to be spread across four ranks is that the 4Gb integrated circuits (ICs) that made up those 16GB quad-rank kits are no longer available. Most of today’s DRAM ICs have eight gigabits capacity, so that an eight-chip rank has 8GB capacity and four of those have 32GB capacity. Alternatives include buying very old memory with 4Gb ICs or very cheap memory with 8Gb ICs that have a 16-bit interface (so that four ICs make up a rank). Neither of those alternatives sounds very appealing."
16GB DIMMs are all dual rank so that means you can use 2 DIMMs and get the 4 ranks that you get with a current 4x8GB configuration. Therefore there is no performance penalty going with 2x16GB vs 4x8GB and you are saving a good chunk of money at the same time.
RAM has always been difficult for me to understand, and just when I think I understand it, this happens. Even with my new understanding, it seems that 4x8gb kits perform at least as good as 2x16gb kits. So I guess it comes down to whether or not you want the aesthetic of 4 populated slots at the cost of a small premium.
 

ultrarunner100

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I also read that for 32GB kit, the 2x16 is a lighter load on the controller than the 4x8 kit. I don't know how much difference it all makes, but it's what I read.
Unless I can get the 4x8 kit that is faster or cheaper, I would prefer to go with the 16x2.
I also read that dual-rank is faster than single-rank due to interleaving, but I guess 4x8 single-rank would perform just as well as 2x16 dual-rank, since overall, you have the same number of ranks.
I definitely do want 32GB, but probably won't need to go for more RAM during the life of this build, so either 16x2 or 8x4 would work for me.
 
I also read that for 32GB kit, the 2x16 is a lighter load on the controller than the 4x8 kit. I don't know how much difference it all makes, but it's what I read.
Unless I can get the 4x8 kit that is faster or cheaper, I would prefer to go with the 16x2.
I also read that dual-rank is faster than single-rank due to interleaving, but I guess 4x8 single-rank would perform just as well as 2x16 dual-rank, since overall, you have the same number of ranks.
I definitely do want 32GB, but probably won't need to go for more RAM during the life of this build, so either 16x2 or 8x4 would work for me.
Right now 2x16GB is cheaper than 4x8GB for the same speed and timings. Having 2x16GB also allows you the option of increasing your RAM if you ever need to in the future.
 

helper800

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So @ultrarunner100 after all of that I would do either this which has the Neo memory:
PCPartPicker Part List

CPU: AMD Ryzen 7 3700X 3.6 GHz 8-Core Processor ($294.14 @ Amazon)
Motherboard: MSI B450 TOMAHAWK MAX ATX AM4 Motherboard ($114.99 @ B&H)
Memory: G.Skill Trident Z Neo 32 GB (2 x 16 GB) DDR4-3600 Memory ($189.99 @ Amazon)
Storage: ADATA XPG SX8200 Pro 2 TB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive ($259.99 @ Amazon)
Storage: Western Digital Blue 4 TB 3.5" 5400RPM Internal Hard Drive ($91.90 @ Amazon)
Video Card: Sapphire Radeon RX 5700 XT 8 GB PULSE Video Card ($399.99 @ Newegg)
Case: NZXT H510 ATX Mid Tower Case ($69.98 @ Amazon)
Power Supply: SeaSonic FOCUS 750 W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-modular ATX Power Supply ($109.99 @ B&H)
Case Fan: Noctua NF-A14 industrialPPC-2000 PWM 107.41 CFM 140 mm Fan ($27.95 @ Amazon)
Case Fan: Noctua NF-A14 industrialPPC-2000 PWM 107.41 CFM 140 mm Fan ($27.95 @ Amazon)
Total: $1586.87
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2020-04-19 12:44 EDT-0400


Or this which has the cheaper Ripjaws memory:

PCPartPicker Part List

CPU: AMD Ryzen 7 3700X 3.6 GHz 8-Core Processor ($294.14 @ Amazon)
Motherboard: MSI B450 TOMAHAWK MAX ATX AM4 Motherboard ($114.99 @ B&H)
Memory: G.Skill Ripjaws V 32 GB (2 x 16 GB) DDR4-3600 Memory ($164.99 @ Amazon)
Storage: ADATA XPG SX8200 Pro 2 TB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive ($259.99 @ Amazon)
Storage: Western Digital Blue 4 TB 3.5" 5400RPM Internal Hard Drive ($91.90 @ Amazon)
Video Card: Sapphire Radeon RX 5700 XT 8 GB PULSE Video Card ($399.99 @ Newegg)
Case: NZXT H510 ATX Mid Tower Case ($69.98 @ Amazon)
Power Supply: SeaSonic FOCUS 750 W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-modular ATX Power Supply ($109.99 @ B&H)
Case Fan: Noctua NF-A14 industrialPPC-2000 PWM 107.41 CFM 140 mm Fan ($27.95 @ Amazon)
Case Fan: Noctua NF-A14 industrialPPC-2000 PWM 107.41 CFM 140 mm Fan ($27.95 @ Amazon)
Total: $1561.87
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2020-04-19 12:43 EDT-0400
 

ultrarunner100

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helper800; Maybe I'm missing something, but when I used the G.Skill configurator for the MSI B450 Tomahawk Max, the only Ripjaws V kit it listed is the 16GB (2x8) F4-3200C16D-16GVKB.
But if you or anyone else has had experience with the kit you picked, then I won't argue.
 

helper800

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helper800; Maybe I'm missing something, but when I used the G.Skill configurator for the MSI B450 Tomahawk Max, the only Ripjaws V kit it listed is the 16GB (2x8) F4-3200C16D-16GVKB.
But if you or anyone else has had experience with the kit you picked, then I won't argue.
The reason that this RAM is not mentioned is because of how and why RAM and MOBO companies test what RAM for motherboard X and vice versa. I would be very confident that the specific kits I chose are good for that motherboard. I believe that the Neo RAM came out after the motherboard did and when it did that motherboard was 1 generation older. Generally, RAM companies verify their RAM for the current-gen motherboards (x570 in this example). The motherboards do the same and since neither kit of G Skill RAM existed yet MSI wouldn't have checked it, however, they may have since the MAX variants are specifically made to support the 3000 series CPUs out of the box.
 
Going with DDR4-3600 C16 vs DDR4-3600 C18 isn't worth the extra cost in my opinion. At best you are going to get 2% better performance with the C16 for a near 20% increase in cost. Save that money from the RAM and use $10, or 2.5% increase in cost, to go with the XFX THICC III Ultra. Yes that is the most power hungry of the 5700XTs, it is also one of the quietest, coolest, and highest performing. Its performance is usually 5% above the standard 5700XT so the 2.5% added cost actually makes sense.
PCPartPicker Part List

CPU: AMD Ryzen 7 3700X 3.6 GHz 8-Core Processor ($294.14 @ Amazon)
CPU Cooler: ARCTIC Freezer 34 eSports DUO CPU Cooler ($42.33 @ Amazon)
Motherboard: MSI B450 TOMAHAWK MAX ATX AM4 Motherboard ($114.99 @ B&H)
Memory: OLOy 32 GB (2 x 16 GB) DDR4-3600 Memory ($137.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: ADATA XPG SX8200 Pro 2 TB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive ($259.99 @ Amazon)
Storage: Western Digital Blue 4 TB 3.5" 5400RPM Internal Hard Drive ($91.90 @ Amazon)
Video Card: XFX Radeon RX 5700 XT 8 GB THICC III Ultra Video Card ($409.99 @ B&H)
Case: Fractal Design Meshify C ATX Mid Tower Case ($92.98 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: SeaSonic FOCUS 750 W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-modular ATX Power Supply ($109.99 @ B&H)
Case Fan: Fractal Design X2 GP-12 (Black) 52.3 CFM 120 mm Fan ($12.99 @ Amazon)
Total: $1567.29
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2020-04-19 13:33 EDT-0400

Also I have included a CPU Cooler in here as well. Yes the included Wraith cooler is quite good for an included HSF, this is better and will allow your system to be even quieter. It would also all for you to use the Precision Boost Overdrive function and keep things nice and quiet as well.
 

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