News AMD Ryzen 9 5980HS 'Cezanne' Defeats Intel Tiger Lake in Early Benchmarks

gg83

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Can anyone explain how the M1 is so good at less power? Is x86 just that bad for certain benchmarks? Could the ARM based cpu be designed for high benchmark scores?
 

deksman

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Wouldn't a Tiger Lake-H35 be a more appropriate comparison chip?
They are still 4c/8th CPU's (which is quite frankly pathetic for Intel).
Still, here are the results:
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The Core i7-11370H appears to have a base clock of 3.3 GHz and a boost clock of 4.8 GHz. The CPU scored 1572 in the single-core benchmark and 5065 points in the multi-core.
So overall, a tiny proverbial advantage at single core performance (mainly due to higher boost clocks), and bad multi-core score (compared to AMD).

If I'm reading those numbers correctly, the 11370H scores LOWER than the above tested CPU in the article... and that doesn't paint a good picture for Intel (especially when you consider the fact AMD has TWICE the cores and only slightly higher power consumption).
 
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hotaru251

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Can anyone explain how the M1 is so good at less power? Is x86 just that bad for certain benchmarks? Could the ARM based cpu be designed for high benchmark scores?
it comes down to how they deal with their data handling.

basically ARM has less steps than x86.

less steps = faster results.

think of it like a road.
a slower car can go on a straight road and still beat a faster car that takes a road filled with sharp turns.
 
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ingtar33

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Can anyone explain how the M1 is so good at less power? Is x86 just that bad for certain benchmarks? Could the ARM based cpu be designed for high benchmark scores?
it depends on the benchmark. Greekbench is a terrible test bench, which has been credibly accused of a heavy pro-intel bias in the past, furthermore while it claims it's a cross platform benching program, it's testing has NEVER accurately portrayed cross OS performance. meaning an ARM chip's results are credible against other ARM chips running the same OS, once you start comparing across OS platforms (windows vs iOS vs Andriod) geekbench results turn to trash; which is a shame because geekbench is supposed to be a cross platform result.
 
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samopa

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Can anyone explain how the M1 is so good at less power? Is x86 just that bad for certain benchmarks? Could the ARM based cpu be designed for high benchmark scores?
M1 is an ARM Processor, ARM = Accorn RISC Machine, meaning that M1 is a RISC ( Reduced Instruction Set Computer) processor. A RISC processor essentially very good on doing many simple tasks but sucks at doing single complex task. So if the benchmark is done by performing many simple task, any RISC processor will excel at that kind of benchmark (compare to CISC).

x86-x64 is a CISC (Complex Instruction Set Computer) processor which translate that it very good of doing single complex task and not so good in doing many simple task. That's why they usually need help for doing multiple (in great number) simple task (like GPU).
 
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They are still 4c/8th CPU's (which is quite frankly pathetic for Intel).
Still, here are the results:
.

The Core i7-11370H appears to have a base clock of 3.3 GHz and a boost clock of 4.8 GHz. The CPU scored 1572 in the single-core benchmark and 5065 points in the multi-core.
So overall, a tiny proverbial advantage at single core performance (mainly due to higher boost clocks), and bad multi-core score (compared to AMD).

If I'm reading those numbers correctly, the 11370H scores LOWER than the above tested CPU in the article... and that doesn't paint a good picture for Intel (especially when you consider the fact AMD has TWICE the cores and only slightly higher power consumption).
most people buying those 4 core laptops dont need any more, you guys wanting 8 core for web browsing/general office work is weird
 
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deksman

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most people buying those 4 core laptops dont need any more, you guys wanting 8 core for web browsing/general office work is weird
Uhm, just who exactly would be 'you guys'?

I do content creation (3d animation/rendering), productivity and gaming (like a LOT of other people who own laptops do) on the go.

I hadn't owned a desktop for over 15 years. The portability of a laptop (with the power of a desktop) trounces a desktop PC easily (I actually own a desktop replacement machine/laptop that didn't cost me an arm and a leg thank you very much and has decent upgradeability as well).

Also, while I AM somewhat limited in upgrade paths on a laptop (for most laptops, usually people can only upgrade storage and RAM, though I tend to get more modular laptops which allow CPU swapping as well - and in some cases, dGPU in MXM format - but the replaceable dGPU's in laptops are rare these days and not worth the effort due to inflated costs that manufacturers put up - the CPU, storage and RAM on the other hand can be done cost efficiently), the most optimal time frame for upgrading the laptop seems to be every 4 years (maybe 5). This time frame allows you to use your machine to the fullest before you need to consider upgrading it with something more powerful, and 4-5 years guarantees (more or less) that the performance and efficiency gains from new hw will give you pretty big improvement.

For a certain segment of the population, you may not think they need more than 4 cores, but Internet content is increasing in complexity all the time (as does software which runs on a laptop) and more and more people frequently expand use of their laptops beyond web browsing and general office work into other (more hw demanding) areas.
 
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gg83

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M1 is an ARM Processor, ARM = Accorn RISC Machine, meaning that M1 is a RISC ( Reduced Instruction Set Computer) processor. A RISC processor essentially very good on doing many simple tasks but sucks at doing single complex task. So if the benchmark is done by performing many simple task, any RISC processor will excel at that kind of benchmark (compare to CISC).

x86-x64 is a CISC (Complex Instruction Set Computer) processor which translate that it very good of doing single complex task and not so good in doing many simple task. That's why they usually need help for doing multiple (in great number) simple task (like GPU).
Awesome answer! Thanks!
 
Aug 11, 2020
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Uhm, just who exactly would be 'you guys'?

I do content creation (3d animation/rendering), productivity and gaming (like a LOT of other people who own laptops do) on the go.
no a lot of people dont do that, where did you get that info?

Lots of laptops are used in offices and they just do regular work for which even freaking i3s are enough, where is this notion coming from that everyone needs 8 core beasts? You should look at which laptops sell the most before saying these things.
 

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