AMD's Head Of VR Marketing, Sasa Marinkovic, On The Present And Future Of VR

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VR has to be the most over-hyped technology of this decade. Remember 3-d televisions? When is the last time you've put on your 3-d glasses since you bought that huge expensive television?

It's too bothersome to even put 3-d glasses, no one is going to want to put a big heavy thing on their heads on a regular basis.
 

mamasan2000

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I wonder how much themeparks are going to loose customers once the VR experience kicks off. Real life rollercoaster in your VR unit, parachuting, flying etc.
The content side of it is going to be interesting. I think the tech needs 2-3 years before it's standardized and hardware can really push the data at refresh rates etc required.

I don't feel this is similar to 3D-tvs. VR has many more areas of use.
You know that long ride with kids in the backseat who whine all the time? Slap a VR unit on their heads! Or go shopping in 3D. Can watch all the clothes etc from all angles. Want to know how it feels like and sounds like to drive an F1 car? Could be possible. Or jet pilot. Imagination is the limit. But only once it's used for more than games. If VR enters everyones life and impacts it...that's when we are talking. Your grandma can't use the computer? I bet she could use VR if it has some tactile interface instead.
 
@mamasan2000 - I think that would be the biggest challenge, the "feel" of doing those things in VR. If you are in a VR jet, how do you simulate pulling 2Gs? The visuals and sounds, I would think, are the easy part. But just having those 2 aspects would be amazing. Walk up to a cliff and just barely stop from falling off and get that emotional feeling from barely regaining your balance. But to get that feeling of banking a jet at Mach 1, that would be difficult to simulate, but astounding if they find a way to do it.
 

hannibal

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The demos with early Oculust rift has proven to me that this has much more viability than 3D ever did before.
The ability to turn your head and see what is in your left side, right side, above or below you is huge, even in low resolutions. It just needs very powerful system and high res VR equipment to come full experience. The 3D experience in it self is not the main thing, but the ability to be part of the VR-environment will be!
 

iam2thecrowe

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VR has to be the most over-hyped technology of this decade. Remember 3-d televisions? When is the last time you've put on your 3-d glasses since you bought that huge expensive television?

It's too bothersome to even put 3-d glasses, no one is going to want to put a big heavy thing on their heads on a regular basis.
I have to agree strongly with this. If AMD invest too heavily into VR, it will contribute significantly to their downfall. Its good to not have all your eggs in one basket, but if there are too many baskets and they're not good eggs, then that's not good. It would be nice if they just did one thing well rather than do everything sub-par.
 

eldragon0

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I feel like all the people who say "they don't see the hype" or it's "over hyped" are vastly missing the train.....Gaming isn't the only usage for VR, and honestly, VR Gaming isn't the thing I'm the most hyped about. What I'm the most hyped about is Dynamic resolution scaling virtual desktop setups. Imagine Your 4k HMD with 10 Virtual 4k Displays setup around you. You click on Vegas or After effects, and it instantly reconfigures to a 3+1 Display setup, or photoshop and it changes to a 1-1 With one screen being larger for easier display when zoomed. Yes the gaming may be gimmicky for a while, but the for-mentioned software already exists in a mild form.
(Mute it... his voice is annoying as hell but it's an example of such software.)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s2VThF3Fqo4
 

scolaner

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VR has to be the most over-hyped technology of this decade. Remember 3-d televisions? When is the last time you've put on your 3-d glasses since you bought that huge expensive television?

It's too bothersome to even put 3-d glasses, no one is going to want to put a big heavy thing on their heads on a regular basis.
I ask this with no malice: Have you tried any VR HMDs? And if so, which one(s)?

The vast majority of people see a VR demo and are blown away. VERY few people aren't, but what those folks say, I find fascinating.
 

c4s2k3

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VR has to be the most over-hyped technology of this decade. Remember 3-d televisions? When is the last time you've put on your 3-d glasses since you bought that huge expensive television?

It's too bothersome to even put 3-d glasses, no one is going to want to put a big heavy thing on their heads on a regular basis.
I ask this with no malice: Have you tried any VR HMDs? And if so, which one(s)?

The vast majority of people see a VR demo and are blown away. VERY few people aren't, but what those folks say, I find fascinating.
Yes, the VR demos are extremely cool. Some downright breathtaking. They are supposed to be, if they want to sell the technology. And there is no denying that the perceived level of immersion is beyond anything else to date.

Aside from real technical hurdles (like users that need eyeglasses, motion sickness in a significant part of the population, etc.), the real question for me is where are the practical applications for the tech? And it's not that there aren't any practical applications. There are. For instance, procedural training for medicine, equipment maintenance, etc. But practical VR applications require appropriate input mechanisms with proper feedback. So far the input mechanisms getting attention seem to be aimed at gaming, so one could not be faulted for assuming gaming is currently the 'premier' application for this technology.

So for gaming (or some other form of entertainment), how many would be willing to spend the money to acquire the VR HMD plus whatever "new and improved" input mechanism becomes available to use with games? If the input mechanism happens to require more space than a keyboard and mouse to operate (such as some of the hand-held sticks floating around), would you be willing to make space for it? And that assumes there are games and other content developed with VR in mind, and make good use of the input mechanism "du jour". The answer may depend on what kinds of games or other entertainment you enjoy. With all that in mind, I personally don't see fully myself buying into it. I just don't see any future content (game or otherwise) that would make it compelling enough *for me*. If enough people do not feel as I do, the tech will succeed.
 

scolaner

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All valid points. I just think that there will be enough people to buy in that it will be successful. Simple as that. :)

But also, I actually think that the "practical" applications will come later. At first, it will be all entertainment--which is fine. The content ecosystem is growing fast. And it's not just games--it's movies, and user-generated content.

I do, however, agree with you that the costs and practicalities associated with some of the requirements of VR are going to be significant hurdles for many. If you don't have space enough for full-room VR, that is a significant limiting factor. But that's the high-end part of things. Just as people spend a ton of money tricking out their gaming PCs, people will find ways to secure physical space for VR experiences.

It won't be everyone; but there's a ton of really amazing stuff happening at the middle and low-end...and I think those will see perhaps more rapid adoption. And those experiences can serve as a gateway to the higher-end experiences.

Just my opinion. I think your concerns are all totally valid, though.
 

voodoochicken

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VR has to be the most over-hyped technology of this decade. Remember 3-d televisions? When is the last time you've put on your 3-d glasses since you bought that huge expensive television?
This weekend. I got Captain America 2 and Avengers 2 and it was AWESOME, I was really surprised about Cap 2, I had really missed some fun in theaters
 
VR has to be the most over-hyped technology of this decade. Remember 3-d televisions? When is the last time you've put on your 3-d glasses since you bought that huge expensive television?

It's too bothersome to even put 3-d glasses, no one is going to want to put a big heavy thing on their heads on a regular basis.
3D has been tried again and again the movies are not selling heck if they offer the regular version vs the 3D I go to the regular. I don't see any reason to pay the premium for 3D when its not much if any an improvement in the experience. I.

I haven't tried VR but I hope it's not going to same thing as 3D a big expensive waste of money. Of course with VR, AMD can make us see them as having cutting edge CPUs and GPUs and they are a profitable and growing company. Until one takes off the headset. I hope that they aren't wasting their time and money on this when they could have used it on their CPU & GPU R&D.
 

iam2thecrowe

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I wouldnt say big waste of money, its a nice idea, but its a niche market, therefore small market. AMD cant afford to be pouring funds into small market segments.
 
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