Discussion An Encrypted, Anonymous live chat hosted by Command Prompt

USAFRet

Titan
Moderator
"command prompt" ?
You might as well ask why this capability does not exist in Notepad, or Adobe Acrobat, or MS Paint.

cmd.exe is a specific tool for a specific purpose.
That capability does not exist at the command prompt because:
  1. No one wrote it (yes, capabilities take code to actually do something)
  2. There are other tools and applications that do this
  3. Any junior developer that suggested this would be laughed out of the office
 
Reactions: TJ Hooker
I don't understand what command prompt has to do with this. Do you want this chate to operate completely in command line rather than a GUI for some reason?

Do you mean the participants are all completely anonymous to each other? Or just to the outside world? If the users are anonymous to each other, how would they initially make contact with each other to exchange the password/registration details required in order to join the chat in the first place?

There are a number of messaging services/apps that offer end to end encryption. https://www.tomsguide.com/us/pictures-story/761-best-encrypted-messaging-apps.html

To be blunt, this kind of comes across as "I'm 14 and just had this totally awesome, never before conceived idea".
 
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USAFRet

Titan
Moderator
Participants would be completely anonymous to each other. The outside world wouldn't be able to see this, only anyone signed into that particular session would be able to see what's going on (not including anyone who can see their computer screen). As far as why CMD? Well, one I just had a picture of my head, I like the idea of the plainness of it, a command-line based live chat that is just super basic. Two command prompt is already a text base and the chat window (that I have in my head) would be just that: a line for line chat of people entering their entries and responses the same way it would look as if you pulled up codes for a console command list in a game. A solid black background, green text, and the ability to chat with anyone anywhere any time without having to have a web browser opened. Simplistic.
So there would need to be some sort of logical grouping due to topic.
You don't want someone looking for legal advice during a divorce talking to a 13 year old wanting to talk about Fortnite.
And then you'd need some sort of admin or moderator, to keep the trolls at bay.
And available on just about every operating system and version.
And text based

hm...you just invented a time machine, and discovered IRC!
 
This idea doesn't seem outside of the realm of possibility.
Oh, I don't think any of us consider this to be impossible. It's more that we can't think of any good reason why anyone would develop or use such a program.

I still don't see any reason why someone would want this be all done via command line, other than so they can feel like a 'l33t haxor' because they're working in a terminal window.

And as has been said, encrypted/'anonymous' messenger applications already exist. If you want to take anonymity to the next level, you could use a VPN and/or Tor networking.

It really seems like you're trying to reinvent the wheel here, in a way that would get you an inferior wheel.
 
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USAFRet

Titan
Moderator
Well, to be clear, the content of this would be much more pointed. Nobody can just join in unless they are specifically given the registration key and password for the convo that you expressly created, so, you would never be talking to any 13 year old about Fortnite unless that was specifically the purpose of creating the discussion assuming that the person that you gave the reg key and password to was to know what you needed to talk to them about. It would be less, random people than very specifically purposed conversation with very specific people.

Just out of random example...……….. if someone, for example... needed to have a conversation with someone in a case where it might be aggressively frowned upon to be discovered chatting with them in any public situation. That may be an example of where something like this would be of use.
So how do I know who to give this reg key to?
 

USAFRet

Titan
Moderator
You could simply test it to them. Even if someone somehow stole/hacked/sniffed/read the text they would have no idea what it was for, but the person you sent it to would know exactly what it was for.
Text it to whom? Let's say you are knowledgeable on F-150 trucks.
I have an F-150.

How do I find you, some random internet person, to send you this registration key and password, so that you and I can converse on the overheating issue with my truck?
 

USAFRet

Titan
Moderator
Didn't I already answer this? The person you're communicating with isn't random, just anonymous and secure. You would have some prior communication with them and could text them what they need to join your discussion. It's a lot like Windows 10's Quick Assist. There are tons of remote support tools out there you have to download and install or join a web page for or buy or whatever, but Quick Assist is built directly into Windows 10 and requires no web browser, no install of software, no buying anything, it's just already there and that makes it way way way more convenient for remote support than anything else specific to Win10. That idea is a lot like this. It would in theory be that simple to use.
So if this already exists, what value does shoving this into cmd bring to the table?
As you say...it already exists.

And from a security viewpoint, this is a really bad idea.
Adding internet wide connection/communication capabilities into the tool that can be used to manipulate every part of my OS, data, and hardware is a very, very bad idea.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Responses generally ARE toxically negative to ideas that everybody except the person who came up with them understands are really bad ideas.

That being said, and without trying to be "toxic", I can only say that the fact that nobody comes into a thread where a bad idea has been presented, and a number of very good reasons WHY it is a bad idea have been counter presented to explain why it's a bad idea, and offers positive reinforcement for the bad idea, does not make the replies toxic. It just makes them honest. Sometimes honesty "feels" toxic when it's OUR own idea, but that's usually not true once we reflect upon it at a later date.

Nobody wishes to chase you away from Tom's hardware, but the idea is bad, and we tend to not coddle people with warm fuzzies when they ask for honest opinions about an idea that most everybody can see from the start is tremendously, horribly, not good.

And as mentioned, there are and have been a number of similar methods of online communication available that are not browser based, not particularly easily trackable, offer potentially anonymous participation and DON'T open your system up to complete and easy control by nefarious third parties, like IRC, Talkomatic, CB simulator, ICQ and most recently, Team viewer. None of which require a browser and all of which can be available ONLY to whomever it is you are wanting to directly communicate with. No command line access required or allowed. Much more secure than allowing somebody else access to the entire kernel.
 

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