Analyzing The Razer Purple (Optomechanical) Keyboard Switch

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scolaner

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Jul 30, 2014
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Divorce the switch mechanism from the sensing method. These switches are still mechanical in that they have physical, moving parts and aren't rubber domes. They're optical because instead of relying on metal contact points to trigger actuation, they rely on an optical sensor of some kind.
 

Rob1C

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The best Computer Keyboard would simulate the wanted operation of the traditional Typewriter and improve upon the faults.

I've used a Typewriter for many years, for those unaware of what that entails, briefly:

You press a key and there's a bit of travel where the slack of the mechanism is taken up (that is an undesirable action but a necessary part of mass produced mechanical keyboards.

Next there is the travel of the key, much too long in a Typewriter but part of building inertia for the swinging and striking of the typeface to the ribbon.

Once a certain amount of force has been applied the inertia should carry the typeface forward and you should be able to reposition your finger onto the next key - hopefully not too quickly or you'll get your typefaces interlocked and have to untangle them.

That's the critical parts of a perfect Computer Keyboard the feeling, short travel, the breakaway and N-key rollover.

Nowadays this can be done with a few springs, we don't need the linkage of the past.

An 'optical keyboard' seems an expensive gimmick. Hall effect sensors would be non-contact and more resistant to dust. They should work on the perfection of the feeling of typing before they add more LEDs.
 

lsatenstein

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The optical key switch is really a sensor with a shutter. One model works with the shutter open, and the other the reverse way, closed. Put these switches in a mouse, and have a 20 year mouse that would outlive your PC or desktop.
 
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