Question Android (type) tv boxes/streaming devices—how to choose?

Newb888

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I've had some experience in the past with Asian tv boxes running Android OS. Often, despite the packaging , specifications, and existing user hardware (tv, HDMI cable) listed, they don't deliver as promised.

In particular, many claim they play 4K (2160p or higher) but in fact, despite the appropriate hardware they may only display (feed a 720p or 1080p) signal. I've read about this and tested it out and with some Android boxes, they have delivered as promised but they tend to run very hot and need some sort of external cooling. However, this was many years ago when most people had 720p and 1080p sets.

Is there anyway looking at the specs of an Android box including chipset in knowing if the box's display signal will reflect your TV's signal of 2160p? I have eliminated Firestick and Chromecast because they don't have an external RJ45 (ethernet) connection.

Thanks in advance.
 

kanewolf

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I've had some experience in the past with Asian tv boxes running Android OS. Often, despite the packaging , specifications, and existing user hardware (tv, HDMI cable) listed, they don't deliver as promised.

In particular, many claim they play 4K (2160p or higher) but in fact, despite the appropriate hardware they may only display (feed a 720p or 1080p) signal. I've read about this and tested it out and with some Android boxes, they have delivered as promised but they tend to run very hot and need some sort of external cooling. However, this was many years ago when most people had 720p and 1080p sets.

Is there anyway looking at the specs of an Android box including chipset in knowing if the box's display signal will reflect your TV'it s signal of 2160p? I have eliminated Firestick and Chromecast because they don't have an external RJ45 (ethernet) connection.

Thanks in advance.
It isn't the hardware that is the problem, it is the copy protection built into the software.
The generic Android boxes aren't trusted by the apps. So the software limits the resolution.
 

Newb888

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It isn't the hardware that is the problem, it is the copy protection built into the software.
The generic Android boxes aren't trusted by the apps. So the software limits the resolution.
That's not true in my experience.

As I said, I have seen and used (other) generic Android boxes that are not "certified" and they do display the advertised native resolution of 1080p on a set that's expected to display 1080p.
 

Newb888

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VPN should be handled by network hardware, IMO.
Lol. That's overkill in most situations and terribly expensive imo when you factor into the fact most people use ISP provided modems/routers and brand new hardware encrypted routers with built in VPN capabilities are very expensive. However, not everyone can agree on what's expensive in a world of decadence and vanity. A good premium VPN and app or client is good enough for most people who need or want to use a VPN, imo of course 😁
 

USAFRet

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Lol. That's overkill in most situations and terribly expensive imo when you factor into the fact most people use ISP provided modems/routers and brand new hardware encrypted routers with built in VPN capabilities are very expensive. However, not everyone can agree on what's expensive in a world of decadence and vanity. A good premium VPN and app or client is good enough for most people who need or want to use a VPN, imo of course 😁
This depends on what you need the VPN for.
 
Lol. That's overkill in most situations and terribly expensive imo when you factor into the fact most people use ISP provided modems/routers and brand new hardware encrypted routers with built in VPN capabilities are very expensive. However, not everyone can agree on what's expensive in a world of decadence and vanity. A good premium VPN and app or client is good enough for most people who need or want to use a VPN, imo of course 😁
Everyday folks don't need VPN to stream video either. And for expats who want to Netflix (eg) US shows in (eg) Europe, the extra expense of VPN-capable secondary router won't break the bank.
 

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