another amd dual core question

jp03hplayer

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Hey all im just about to get an amd 64 3500. I know that the socket 939 motherboard i get to acomodate this cpu will be able to handlge amd's dual core in the future. My question is are the new dual core chips going to have any new features that would make it beneficial to buy a new mobo when they come out, like will a motherboard that I purchase now create any bottlenecks for future dual core proscessors??

Thanks SOOOO much!

Jeff
 

raretech

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I could be wrong... Support for DDR2 may be out by the time these chips ship... Also, no guarantee your mobo maker will offer a bios update for your mobo at the time. Only things I could think of.

<i>Official Cyrix fanboy. Cyrix Instead!</i>
 

Mephistopheles

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Hm, I can think of something: AMD's dual core solution will have only one dual-channel memory controller because of the 939 pins of the socket they use. This <i>might</i> be a limiting factor, but it's not a big deal and there's nothing you can do about it. Actually, I even suspect AMD won't do anything about that.

Plus, in order to truly reap the benefits of dual-core, you'd want an acceptably-clocked dual-core processor. Sorry for being skeptical, but there will always be the possibility that your mobo might only accept lower clocks... of dual core processors, that is... There is currently very little information on AMD's dual-core clock rates and so on.

I suspect they won't be able to ramp clock as well on dual core processors as they will with single-core (actually, that's kind of a technological given)... And power specs might also require some adjustments with later-gen dual-cores.....

But in general, I think you're as safe and future-proof as you can be nowadays with a good deluxe s939 mobo.
 

jp03hplayer

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So what you are saying is that a motherboard i purchase now might not be able to handle the clock speeds of each of the individual cores, like each individual core may be faster than any of the amd64 cores that are currently available, and thus too fast for current boards?
 

raretech

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<i>This might be a limiting factor, but it's not a big deal and there's nothing you can do about it. Actually, I even suspect AMD won't do anything about that.</i>

Ahem, that's called a "feature". ;)

<i>Plus, in order to truly reap the benefits of dual-core, you'd want an acceptably-clocked dual-core processor. Sorry for being skeptical, but there will always be the possibility that your mobo might only accept lower clocks... of dual core processors, that is...</i>

I would worry less about this. If he's talking about adopting a first generation dual core, I think he'll be fine, provided the mobo makers update the bios. But then, I have to ask, why spend for such a high end chip now if you plan on being an early adopter? And if you're not going to be an early adopter, then I'm not sure it's even worth worrying about. You'll probably want a new motherboard when the time finally comes, for all the new things out, like ddr2, and whatever else... Just my opinion...

<i>Forget AMD and Intel, those are for fanboy lusers. The C3 is where it's at. Via Rulez!</i>
 

Mephistopheles

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You're right in saying that there is a chance you'll actually want a completely revamped mobo... Because of new technologies like PCIe or possibly DDR2.

That's why I'm not so excited about upgrades in general. I tend to go for a completely new computer instead. After all, there's nothing as frankensteinian as seeing a 1.7Ghz Willamette with a GF 6800 Ultra, for instance...
 

trooper11

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i dont know about ram these days... ddr2 may be just starting, but its future is sitll very up in the air. even intel is hedging its bets by supporting fb-dimm. with ddr3 to intro sometime next year, I think amd is going to wait as long as it possible can before adopting a new memory type, perhaps skipping ddr2 all together, who knows.