Another Memory Question

Je

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Simply, how do you determine whether a chip is high or low density? Seems
no two chips have the same exact information attached to them and it is
really confusing do those of us who are already confused!!

Thanks,
Jack

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G

Guest

Guest
Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.gateway2000 (More info?)

Most often, by the chip count, though the specs are needed sometimes.

128 megabit per chip or less is considered low-density. That means a 128
MByte module must have 8 or 9 chips on it, and a 256 must have 16 or 18 (the
latter number for ECC).

Sometimes, the internal chip architecture makes a difference - a 32X4 chip
is still 128 megabit but not supported by many older (440BX, 810/e and early
815/e) chipsets -- you need a 16X8 architecture.



"JE" <Zeke@legs.com> wrote in message
news:5z1fc.190$zy2.47@newssvr32.news.prodigy.com...
> Simply, how do you determine whether a chip is high or low density? Seems
> no two chips have the same exact information attached to them and it is
> really confusing do those of us who are already confused!!
 

Je

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Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.gateway2000 (More info?)

Thanks Ed.

If I understand right, I see a 256MB chip with 8 chips on it, so that would
be a high density one and all with 16 on it would be low density!? Would
you need to locate the motherboard make and see which is compatible?

Thanks,
Jack


"Edward J. Neth" <ejn63@netscape.com> wrote in message
news:3jkfc.420$jm1.237@newssvr15.news.prodigy.com...
> Most often, by the chip count, though the specs are needed sometimes.
>
> 128 megabit per chip or less is considered low-density. That means a 128
> MByte module must have 8 or 9 chips on it, and a 256 must have 16 or 18
(the
> latter number for ECC).
>
> Sometimes, the internal chip architecture makes a difference - a 32X4 chip
> is still 128 megabit but not supported by many older (440BX, 810/e and
early
> 815/e) chipsets -- you need a 16X8 architecture.
>
>
>
> "JE" <Zeke@legs.com> wrote in message
> news:5z1fc.190$zy2.47@newssvr32.news.prodigy.com...
> > Simply, how do you determine whether a chip is high or low density?
Seems
> > no two chips have the same exact information attached to them and it is
> > really confusing do those of us who are already confused!!
>
>
 
G

Guest

Guest
Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.gateway2000 (More info?)

256/8 chip is high density. Which system are you buying for?



"JE" <Zeke@legs.com> wrote in message
news:xyygc.781$vR2.222@newssvr16.news.prodigy.com...
> Thanks Ed.
>
> If I understand right, I see a 256MB chip with 8 chips on it, so that
would
> be a high density one and all with 16 on it would be low density!? Would
> you need to locate the motherboard make and see which is compatible?
>
> Thanks,
> Jack
>
>
> "Edward J. Neth" <ejn63@netscape.com> wrote in message
> news:3jkfc.420$jm1.237@newssvr15.news.prodigy.com...
> > Most often, by the chip count, though the specs are needed sometimes.
> >
> > 128 megabit per chip or less is considered low-density. That means a
128
> > MByte module must have 8 or 9 chips on it, and a 256 must have 16 or 18
> (the
> > latter number for ECC).
> >
> > Sometimes, the internal chip architecture makes a difference - a 32X4
chip
> > is still 128 megabit but not supported by many older (440BX, 810/e and
> early
> > 815/e) chipsets -- you need a 16X8 architecture.
> >
> >
> >
> > "JE" <Zeke@legs.com> wrote in message
> > news:5z1fc.190$zy2.47@newssvr32.news.prodigy.com...
> > > Simply, how do you determine whether a chip is high or low density?
> Seems
> > > no two chips have the same exact information attached to them and it
is
> > > really confusing do those of us who are already confused!!
> >
> >
>
>
 

Je

Distinguished
Apr 11, 2004
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Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.gateway2000 (More info?)

It was in a Gateway M800 machine with an Intel D815 board and I want to
upgrade to 512MB.

"Edward J. Neth" <ejn63@netscape.com> wrote in message
news:q8zgc.199$tG1.149@newssvr32.news.prodigy.com...
> 256/8 chip is high density. Which system are you buying for?
>
>
>
> "JE" <Zeke@legs.com> wrote in message
> news:xyygc.781$vR2.222@newssvr16.news.prodigy.com...
> > Thanks Ed.
> >
> > If I understand right, I see a 256MB chip with 8 chips on it, so that
> would
> > be a high density one and all with 16 on it would be low density!?
Would
> > you need to locate the motherboard make and see which is compatible?
> >
> > Thanks,
> > Jack
> >
> >
> > "Edward J. Neth" <ejn63@netscape.com> wrote in message
> > news:3jkfc.420$jm1.237@newssvr15.news.prodigy.com...
> > > Most often, by the chip count, though the specs are needed sometimes.
> > >
> > > 128 megabit per chip or less is considered low-density. That means a
> 128
> > > MByte module must have 8 or 9 chips on it, and a 256 must have 16 or
18
> > (the
> > > latter number for ECC).
> > >
> > > Sometimes, the internal chip architecture makes a difference - a 32X4
> chip
> > > is still 128 megabit but not supported by many older (440BX, 810/e and
> > early
> > > 815/e) chipsets -- you need a 16X8 architecture.
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > > "JE" <Zeke@legs.com> wrote in message
> > > news:5z1fc.190$zy2.47@newssvr32.news.prodigy.com...
> > > > Simply, how do you determine whether a chip is high or low density?
> > Seems
> > > > no two chips have the same exact information attached to them and it
> is
> > > > really confusing do those of us who are already confused!!
> > >
> > >
> >
> >
>
>
 
G

Guest

Guest
Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.gateway2000 (More info?)

It needs low density RAM. 2X256, 16 chips each is the maximum capacity of
the board.



"JE" <Zeke@legs.com> wrote in message
news:RRzgc.9539$dd.4601@newssvr31.news.prodigy.com...
> It was in a Gateway M800 machine with an Intel D815 board and I want to
> upgrade to 512MB.
>
> "Edward J. Neth" <ejn63@netscape.com> wrote in message
> news:q8zgc.199$tG1.149@newssvr32.news.prodigy.com...
> > 256/8 chip is high density. Which system are you buying for?
> >
> >
> >
> > "JE" <Zeke@legs.com> wrote in message
> > news:xyygc.781$vR2.222@newssvr16.news.prodigy.com...
> > > Thanks Ed.
> > >
> > > If I understand right, I see a 256MB chip with 8 chips on it, so that
> > would
> > > be a high density one and all with 16 on it would be low density!?
> Would
> > > you need to locate the motherboard make and see which is compatible?
> > >
> > > Thanks,
> > > Jack
> > >
> > >
> > > "Edward J. Neth" <ejn63@netscape.com> wrote in message
> > > news:3jkfc.420$jm1.237@newssvr15.news.prodigy.com...
> > > > Most often, by the chip count, though the specs are needed
sometimes.
> > > >
> > > > 128 megabit per chip or less is considered low-density. That means
a
> > 128
> > > > MByte module must have 8 or 9 chips on it, and a 256 must have 16 or
> 18
> > > (the
> > > > latter number for ECC).
> > > >
> > > > Sometimes, the internal chip architecture makes a difference - a
32X4
> > chip
> > > > is still 128 megabit but not supported by many older (440BX, 810/e
and
> > > early
> > > > 815/e) chipsets -- you need a 16X8 architecture.
> > > >
> > > >
> > > >
> > > > "JE" <Zeke@legs.com> wrote in message
> > > > news:5z1fc.190$zy2.47@newssvr32.news.prodigy.com...
> > > > > Simply, how do you determine whether a chip is high or low
density?
> > > Seems
> > > > > no two chips have the same exact information attached to them and
it
> > is
> > > > > really confusing do those of us who are already confused!!
> > > >
> > > >
> > >
> > >
> >
> >
>
>
 

Je

Distinguished
Apr 11, 2004
80
0
18,630
0
Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.gateway2000 (More info?)

Thanks again for all of your help. I have a better understanding of these
things now, but much more to learn!

Jack

"Edward J. Neth" <ejn63@netscape.com> wrote in message
news:w9Agc.216$IZ1.141@newssvr32.news.prodigy.com...
> It needs low density RAM. 2X256, 16 chips each is the maximum capacity of
> the board.
>
>
>
> "JE" <Zeke@legs.com> wrote in message
> news:RRzgc.9539$dd.4601@newssvr31.news.prodigy.com...
> > It was in a Gateway M800 machine with an Intel D815 board and I want to
> > upgrade to 512MB.
> >
> > "Edward J. Neth" <ejn63@netscape.com> wrote in message
> > news:q8zgc.199$tG1.149@newssvr32.news.prodigy.com...
> > > 256/8 chip is high density. Which system are you buying for?
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > > "JE" <Zeke@legs.com> wrote in message
> > > news:xyygc.781$vR2.222@newssvr16.news.prodigy.com...
> > > > Thanks Ed.
> > > >
> > > > If I understand right, I see a 256MB chip with 8 chips on it, so
that
> > > would
> > > > be a high density one and all with 16 on it would be low density!?
> > Would
> > > > you need to locate the motherboard make and see which is compatible?
> > > >
> > > > Thanks,
> > > > Jack
> > > >
> > > >
> > > > "Edward J. Neth" <ejn63@netscape.com> wrote in message
> > > > news:3jkfc.420$jm1.237@newssvr15.news.prodigy.com...
> > > > > Most often, by the chip count, though the specs are needed
> sometimes.
> > > > >
> > > > > 128 megabit per chip or less is considered low-density. That
means
> a
> > > 128
> > > > > MByte module must have 8 or 9 chips on it, and a 256 must have 16
or
> > 18
> > > > (the
> > > > > latter number for ECC).
> > > > >
> > > > > Sometimes, the internal chip architecture makes a difference - a
> 32X4
> > > chip
> > > > > is still 128 megabit but not supported by many older (440BX, 810/e
> and
> > > > early
> > > > > 815/e) chipsets -- you need a 16X8 architecture.
> > > > >
> > > > >
> > > > >
> > > > > "JE" <Zeke@legs.com> wrote in message
> > > > > news:5z1fc.190$zy2.47@newssvr32.news.prodigy.com...
> > > > > > Simply, how do you determine whether a chip is high or low
> density?
> > > > Seems
> > > > > > no two chips have the same exact information attached to them
and
> it
> > > is
> > > > > > really confusing do those of us who are already confused!!
> > > > >
> > > > >
> > > >
> > > >
> > >
> > >
> >
> >
>
>
 

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