Question Another shocking case, Holmes!

Aug 28, 2020
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Sorry for the pun.
Similar problem with voltage leak to case with a twist. I can feel mild shock on fingers near nails (very sensitive where I have bitten nails). Painful and persistent. Now the problem is that I am in the Philippines where there is no ground on most outlets, the current here is 220v AC, which means BOTH wires are hot. I am connected to a line (voltage) stabilizer and a good surge protected power bar. Is there any reason I could not use rubber or nylon washers beneath the motherboard and secure it with nylon screws? I am thinking that will solve the problem IF it is the mother board that is causing the problem. All cords appear to be in good shape. I don't remember having a problem in the many years of building and repair but that was in the States with 110v and functioning ground.
Thoughts and suggestions welcome, Thanks in advance.

Gigabyte GA-F2A68HM-S1
A-8 apu
CoolerMaster Elite V3 600 ps
 
Aug 28, 2020
5
0
10
0
Thanks but the article was basically useless. Most people do not understand how insane electrical systems are here as well as the equally loony water system. So to forestall some suggestions that might be well intended but impossible to implement, here is what I deal with.

As noted, we have 220v only the newest and expensive buildings have grounded receptacles. Why? First, anyone who wants to be a electrician (plumber, carpenter, construction worker) simply buy wire and stuff and starts working. If caught doing unlicensed work one then pays off the inspector and for a price, gets a license.

Secondly, cheap is the overriding consideration here. No one builds lower cost (even new) structures using metal conduit. They do single strand wire pulled through PLASTIC conduit and usually NOT rigid conduit but "slinky" tube.

As far ground to water pipes? Guess what, every supply line in the our neighborhood is PLASTIC. On occasion they do use actual plastic water line, but it is not uncommon to find used rigid plastic electrical conduit pressed into service. Downspout pipes? Pressed fiber. Drain pipes? Plastic. Also most of these are simply laid in place or stuck in chiseled channels and cemented over. One major water line cracked and I never saw any new pipe. I strongly suspect that they shut off the supply and poured concrete over the cracked section and called it fixed!

There are no ground rods installed in most construction unless it is a government building or for people with big money.

A very recent tale of infrastructure installation, i.e. this morning. A group of workmen arrived assembled metal scaffolding and climbed into the maze of service connections on two concrete columns on our street. These were originally poured as part of porches to save money and time instead of using "high tech" fancy things like poles and holes dug deep to support. Ours has 8 service entrances, these are metal solely because they are in plain sight. Four pieces of 3/8th inch rebar protrude from the top, and are used by phone, internet, and cable providers to hold lines-by wrapping them around a few times. The mission today was the installation of solar powered street light. I didn't pay much attention until they finished in roughly 45 minutes and then moved to repeat the installation on the other concrete column/ I looked out my bedroom window (second floor) to the column which is six feet from the window. The rapid installation was quickly resolved. Two of the rebar sections on the street side were bent across each other and the support tube placed across the junction. AT the rear the tube was laid on the column and the rebar bent over the top. Now don't think they foolishly left it unsecured. Oh no no no, at each junction of tube and rebar, they used a SINGLE WIRE SILVER TWIST TIE to hold the tube in place!
 

jay32267

Glorious
Thanks but the article was basically useless. Most people do not understand how insane electrical systems are here as well as the equally loony water system. So to forestall some suggestions that might be well intended but impossible to implement, here is what I deal with.

As noted, we have 220v only the newest and expensive buildings have grounded receptacles. Why? First, anyone who wants to be a electrician (plumber, carpenter, construction worker) simply buy wire and stuff and starts working. If caught doing unlicensed work one then pays off the inspector and for a price, gets a license.

Secondly, cheap is the overriding consideration here. No one builds lower cost (even new) structures using metal conduit. They do single strand wire pulled through PLASTIC conduit and usually NOT rigid conduit but "slinky" tube.

As far ground to water pipes? Guess what, every supply line in the our neighborhood is PLASTIC. On occasion they do use actual plastic water line, but it is not uncommon to find used rigid plastic electrical conduit pressed into service. Downspout pipes? Pressed fiber. Drain pipes? Plastic. Also most of these are simply laid in place or stuck in chiseled channels and cemented over. One major water line cracked and I never saw any new pipe. I strongly suspect that they shut off the supply and poured concrete over the cracked section and called it fixed!

There are no ground rods installed in most construction unless it is a government building or for people with big money.

A very recent tale of infrastructure installation, i.e. this morning. A group of workmen arrived assembled metal scaffolding and climbed into the maze of service connections on two concrete columns on our street. These were originally poured as part of porches to save money and time instead of using "high tech" fancy things like poles and holes dug deep to support. Ours has 8 service entrances, these are metal solely because they are in plain sight. Four pieces of 3/8th inch rebar protrude from the top, and are used by phone, internet, and cable providers to hold lines-by wrapping them around a few times. The mission today was the installation of solar powered street light. I didn't pay much attention until they finished in roughly 45 minutes and then moved to repeat the installation on the other concrete column/ I looked out my bedroom window (second floor) to the column which is six feet from the window. The rapid installation was quickly resolved. Two of the rebar sections on the street side were bent across each other and the support tube placed across the junction. AT the rear the tube was laid on the column and the rebar bent over the top. Now don't think they foolishly left it unsecured. Oh no no no, at each junction of tube and rebar, they used a SINGLE WIRE SILVER TWIST TIE to hold the tube in place!
I understand your point.
Where are you located in the building?
Are you on the ground floor?
You just need to get a wire from the chassis into the ground SOMEHOW.
 

DMAN999

Admirable
Ambassador
Thanks but the article was basically useless. Most people do not understand how insane electrical systems are here as well as the equally loony water system. So to forestall some suggestions that might be well intended but impossible to implement, here is what I deal with.

As noted, we have 220v only the newest and expensive buildings have grounded receptacles. Why? First, anyone who wants to be a electrician (plumber, carpenter, construction worker) simply buy wire and stuff and starts working. If caught doing unlicensed work one then pays off the inspector and for a price, gets a license.

Secondly, cheap is the overriding consideration here. No one builds lower cost (even new) structures using metal conduit. They do single strand wire pulled through PLASTIC conduit and usually NOT rigid conduit but "slinky" tube.

As far ground to water pipes? Guess what, every supply line in the our neighborhood is PLASTIC. On occasion they do use actual plastic water line, but it is not uncommon to find used rigid plastic electrical conduit pressed into service. Downspout pipes? Pressed fiber. Drain pipes? Plastic. Also most of these are simply laid in place or stuck in chiseled channels and cemented over. One major water line cracked and I never saw any new pipe. I strongly suspect that they shut off the supply and poured concrete over the cracked section and called it fixed!

There are no ground rods installed in most construction unless it is a government building or for people with big money.

A very recent tale of infrastructure installation, i.e. this morning. A group of workmen arrived assembled metal scaffolding and climbed into the maze of service connections on two concrete columns on our street. These were originally poured as part of porches to save money and time instead of using "high tech" fancy things like poles and holes dug deep to support. Ours has 8 service entrances, these are metal solely because they are in plain sight. Four pieces of 3/8th inch rebar protrude from the top, and are used by phone, internet, and cable providers to hold lines-by wrapping them around a few times. The mission today was the installation of solar powered street light. I didn't pay much attention until they finished in roughly 45 minutes and then moved to repeat the installation on the other concrete column/ I looked out my bedroom window (second floor) to the column which is six feet from the window. The rapid installation was quickly resolved. Two of the rebar sections on the street side were bent across each other and the support tube placed across the junction. AT the rear the tube was laid on the column and the rebar bent over the top. Now don't think they foolishly left it unsecured. Oh no no no, at each junction of tube and rebar, they used a SINGLE WIRE SILVER TWIST TIE to hold the tube in place!
WOW !!!!

In your case I'd probably just install my own Grounding Rod and run a ground wire from the PC case or the Outlet to the Rod.
How to Install Ground Rods: 10 Steps (with Pictures) - wikiHow
 
Last edited:

DSzymborski

Titan
Moderator
Thanks but the article was basically useless. Most people do not understand how insane electrical systems are here as well as the equally loony water system. So to forestall some suggestions that might be well intended but impossible to implement, here is what I deal with.
I think the problem you're running into is that as true as this is, it doesn't change the basic laws of physics that govern electricity. Electricity acts exactly the same way in a society that prioritizes electric safety as it does in a society that doesn't. That it's much harder to resolve an issue of ungrounded household service in your country than in another country doesn't change the degree of the danger or the necessity of the solution. It may suck, but the solution is always going to be proper grounding, no matter where you are and no matter what the circumstances are.
 
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