[SOLVED] Any glaring issues or better alternatives for my first pc build?

Karadjgne

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6 of one, half a dozen of the other. When you are kicking over @ 100fps, you can't physically see any difference in numbers, only a benchmark can, if you care about such. Anything extra gained in the difference between a 5600x and a 12600k will be in latencies, and at that amount of possible fps, the latencies difference is so small you can't see that either. You are talking about a thousandth of a second or less closer to zero latency.

A 12400 - B660 is a far superior value to a 12600k - Z690, since overclocking is basically moot and does nothing realistic for 12th gen, and the 12400 is generally only a couple of fps behind the 12600k, if at all. Zero point in spending almost double for 1-3% performance gains you cannot see.
 
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Karadjgne

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Wow, averaged over that entire test suite, the 12400 is a whopping 3 frames faster, the 12600k is 15 frames faster, yep, gonna notice that for sure...

£320 for Amd vs £290 for Intel, although personally I'd spend the few extra quid for a 12400 and the igpu vs the F's cheaper price. Considering the performance similarity, for £30, the Intel F is slightly better value, as is paying roughly the same price for the same performance 12400 with an igpu vs Ryzen without.
 
May 5, 2022
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Wow, averaged over that entire test suite, the 12400 is a whopping 3 frames faster, the 12600k is 15 frames faster, yep, gonna notice that for sure...

£320 for Amd vs £290 for Intel, although personally I'd spend the few extra quid for a 12400 and the igpu vs the F's cheaper price. Considering the performance similarity, for £30, the Intel F is slightly better value, as is paying roughly the same price for the same performance 12400 with an igpu vs Ryzen without.
Would the 12500 be worth any consideration? And also do you have any motherboard recommendations as all of the b660 motherboards seem more expensive than the b550 amd motherboards so it feels like any savings I would make by getting the 12400f would be eaten up my the cost of the motherboard (preferably I would like wifi included on the board).
 

Why_Me

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Would the 12500 be worth any consideration? And also do you have any motherboard recommendations as all of the b660 motherboards seem more expensive than the b550 amd motherboards so it feels like any savings I would make by getting the 12400f would be eaten up my the cost of the motherboard (preferably I would like wifi included on the board).
The 12500 isn't worth the extra cost.

https://www.box.co.uk/TUF-GAMING-B660-PLUS-WIFI-D4-ASUS-TUF-Gaming-B660-PLUS-WIFI-D4-Mother_4108108.html
ASUS TUF Gaming B660-PLUS WIFI D4 £136.53

https://www.asus.com/Motherboards-Components/Motherboards/TUF-Gaming/TUF-GAMING-B660-PLUS-WIFI-D4/

https://www.awd-it.co.uk/components/processors/intel/socket-1700-alder-lake/intel-core-i5-12400f-six-core-2-50ghz-cpu-alder-lake-processor-lga-1700.html
Intel Core i5-12400F £162.99

Total: £299.52 inc VAT
 

geofelt

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Would the 12500 be worth any consideration? And also do you have any motherboard recommendations as all of the b660 motherboards seem more expensive than the b550 amd motherboards so it feels like any savings I would make by getting the 12400f would be eaten up my the cost of the motherboard (preferably I would like wifi included on the board).
Worth is something only YOU can determine.
I have found over time that I might regret for a short time the higher price for buying the best.
But if I bought the cheaper option, the joy of saving was short lived and I wondered for a long time if I did the right thing.
If you have the budget, buy the better option.
The turbo for 12400 is 4.4 and the turbo for 12500 is 4.6.What the price difference for you, I don't know. Along the same lines, I favor paying a small price premium to get the integrated graphics of the non F versions.
It is helpful for testing and as insurance if you might have a problem with the discrete graphics card.
The 12400 and 12500 both come with a new version of the intel stock cooler.
In a gaming environment, they should work fine.
They are 65w tdp processors.
In a loaded batch environment, you might want a stronger cooler.
I would plan on the stock cooler and see how you do.
You can always upgrade the cooler later.

Your case is a good one for air cooling.
I might add only one single 120mm fan ar the rear for exhaust.
It is there mainly to direct the airflow past the cpu,motherboard and gpu.

Top fans will tend to deflect the airflow out the top of the case before it gets to the parts that need cooling.
You can always change fans around later if you think you need to.

Usually 3600 speed ram costs about the same as 3200 speed.
It really does not make significant difference in real app performance.

I think your budget is plenty for what you want to do.

B660 is probably the way to go.
Pick a DDR4 version
Prices are better and performance is similar.

Even though your case supports ATX motherboards, you will find better value in the smaller MATX format. The difference is mainly 4 expansion slots vs. 7. How many past the graphics card slot might you plan to use?
The B660 chipset supports latest wifi, but not all motherboards will implement that capability. You will have some options there. You can always implement wifi fia a usb dongle or an add in card. Really, it is easier to have it includes in the first place.

Most ssd devices these days work ok.
But, I like the Samsung ssd devices.
The samsung 970 evo plus or the 980 are both faster sequentially than the wd blue.
And, puget systems likes the reliability of Samsung ssd devices:

750w for a psu is probably appropriate for a 2080 gpu:
http://www.realhardtechx.com/index_archivos/Page362.htm
If you anticipate a gpu upgrade to a 3000 class card, I might consider 850w.
A quality psu is a long term investment.
I would look for a unit with a 7 to 10 year warranty.
Seasonic focus and corsair rm would be good places to look.
 
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Karadjgne

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The Corsair TXM is 1 step above the Corsair RM, but below the RMx/RMi.

I'm not happy with Seasonic lately. Excellent psus for sure, but some of the Focus series had issues with the 3000 cards, those cards have some funky transient spikes and the Focus has such good protections that they were tripping. Seasonic fixed that but there's enough slightly older unfixed units still out there on shelves that I'm leary about recommending them.

750w is peachy for a 2080Super. Especially with a lower wattage cpu. Unless there's fure plans for swapping out the cpu for a monster like the 12700k+ or 5900x+ with a 3080+, then 850w isn't necessary. Won't hurt, but won't spend most of its life in the higher efficiency bracket and won't ever see justification for the expense over the 750w version. I'm running a 3700x/2070Super/full loop just fine on a 600w Corsair SFX.
 

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