Any real advantage to the x38 boards?

Drudge

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I will be buying a new mobo/CPU/RAM within the month and was wondering if I could have some suggestions. This is for the most part going to be used for games, games and more games. I'm leaning towards the Q6600 CPU. I already have a GeForce 8800 GTX but still need some mobo and RAM suggestions.

It's been recommended to me to wait for the x38 boards. Now I ask, why? But whether I do or don't, are there any mobos that support both DDR2 and DDR3 RAM right now? I know DDR3 is the future but it's ridiculously expensive right now so I'd rather stick with DDR2 right now. However, when the time comes to go DDR3 I'm really not going to be in the mood to change out another mobo.

Please help and thanks in advance for any suggestions.
 
ASUS P5KC and GIGABYTE P35C DS3R support both DDR2 and DDR3 but DDR3 option is limited to 4GB but DDR2 is limited to 8GB ,so i think those 4GB slots become necessary also they dont OC as well as P35 DS3R and ASUS P5K-E
 

chookman

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There are going to be x38 mobos that support DDR2 which i think at current would be the best way to go.

The x38 will bring PCI-e 2.0 and support for more pci-e lanes which means we will now be able to run those two 16x slots both a 16x.
 

Falken699

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I am not sure, but I think x38 is going to support PCI-E 2.0, and be backwards compatible with PCI-E.

Just so you know, we are probably going to be getting some monster vcards in the next 1-2 years, so it is a worthy feature IMO.
 

mis33

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Besides the dual PCIe X16, I am not sure what other improvements as compared to P35.

One thing for sure is you will have to pay premium price. Also, there will be the usual growing pain with a new chipset like buggy BIOS, etc.

 

zenmaster

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If you are this close to buying, I would just wait until the 23rd and see what we find out.

Someboard builders are going to do some whacky stuff.
I saw one in which DDR3 will be built into the Mobo which drastically increased the DDR3 performance.

However, I'm not sure I like that idea.
 

andybird123

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PCIe 1.1 and 2.0 are compatible both ways (e.g. 1.1 cards will work in 2.0 slots, but also 2.0 cards will work in 1.1 slots)... graphics cards are no where near using all the bandwidth of a X16 slot currently so I don't think it's worth waiting for specifically, or worrying about if the X38's are much more expensive than a decent P35

X38 is only really for those intent on Crossfire... Intel have announced that X48 will be out in January with support for 1600mhz FSB, if you were "waiting" on something I'd wait on that over and above worrying about PCIe 2.0
 

mis33

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So, if I have to buy a new MB in this 1-2 weeks and if I do not plan on Crossfire, P35 is the way to go.

If I plan on Crossfile, I should wait for X38 or even X48.

 

bydesign

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X38 supports 1600MHz FSB
The X48 appears to be a factory overclocked X38
 

mis33

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I thought X38 would be a good solution in the beginning. After some readings and considering the other components I already bought (2 x 1 GB OCZ DDR2; EVGA 8800GTS-320 MB-SC, etc), I am not sure about X38 anymore.

X38 has the following new technologies:
1. 2 x PCI-E x16 for twin video cards
2. Extreme Memory only for DDR3
3. Performance auto-tuning (to OC dynamically)

I do not plan on using dual VGA nor DDR3 and I will OC only moderately. So, these new features are not so useful for me.

I should probably re-examine my options in P35 MB like IP35-Pro and GA-P35-DQ6.

 
There was some whispering a few months back that Intel might be able to use SLI on the X38 as it had given nVidia licence for some of their technology (I have forgotten what), but I haven't heard anything more on it. It would be nice to actually standardize this whole SLI/CrossFire somewhat so you didn't have to worry what platform your on to run a specific dual GPU setup. It's stupid really when you think about it. nVidia and ATI/AMD both make more money from their GPU's than they do with their SLI/CrossFire enabled chipsets. If you open the platforms up, there is greater flexibility to run multi-GPU's, therefore greater likelihood that people will buy another GPU. Makes sense to me. Everyone this generation of GPU's have flocked to the 8800's and the 6X0SLI chipsets. Now if the stars align and the next generation of cards ATI comes out on top, those with the 6X0SLI boards won't have the option of getting two ATI cards unless they replace their motherboards. It's an artificial limitation.