Question Anyone know how to change what NZXT Cam runs off of for CPU temps?

Apr 29, 2022
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Anyone know how to change what NZXT Cam runs off of for CPU temps? It currently runs off of the CPU Package and not the CPU itself. Armoury Crate puts the CPU 10 degrees colder than the CPU package. Armoury Crate measures both. Reason why is because the fan profile is tied to the CPU Package Temp and not the CPU.
 

Karadjgne

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Cam reads 2 things, depending on what you set it as. Either cpu or liquid temps. There's very few, actually only 2 that I know of, software apps that can physically change where something is read from. One is the ancient fan speed app called SpeedFan, the other is similar and found on github.

'cpu temp' as a lable is misleading since there's several ways to read 'cpu temp', all of which are accurate, but different. Such as package, Hotspot, socket etc.

Package is a centralized sensor on the die. It's the best sensor to use as an average for the entire cpu since it Is central to the die. Hotspot is a per core sensor and there's multiple of those, I think 24 of them on an 8 core cpu. So core #0 could hit 90, all other cores read 60, but the package will pickup radiated heat from #0 but be tempered by the others, so read 70. Socket being under the cpu in that unpinned center section.

All accurate, in their respective areas, but choosing Hotspot over Package means you'd see 90 and freak out that the cpu was overheating, when it's actually not, just 1 core is running hot because of the load. And that load moves, doesn't stay on #0, it'll bounce around as scheduling allows.
 

Colif

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Armoury Crate puts the CPU 10 degrees colder than the CPU package. Armoury Crate measures both. Reason why is because the fan profile is tied to the CPU Package Temp and not the CPU.
Armoury crate is seeing the core temps when it sees them as 10c below package. As stated by DB, the package is the CPU as well, difference being its external to cores. Sounds to me like you have a Ryzen

HWINFO keeps surprising me, I thought it couldn't show temps for each core, but it seems it can


On CPU with more cores than mine, I don't know which sensor on the chip you would want to track as every core could be different temp.

if you have a choice of liquid temp, I would use it. Its what I use on my AIO. Probably keep fans running at a more consistent rate.
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
Cam reads 2 things, depending on what you set it as. Either cpu or liquid temps. There's very few, actually only 2 that I know of, software apps that can physically change where something is read from. One is the ancient fan speed app called SpeedFan, the other is similar and found on github.

'cpu temp' as a lable is misleading since there's several ways to read 'cpu temp', all of which are accurate, but different. Such as package, Hotspot, socket etc.

Package is a centralized sensor on the die. It's the best sensor to use as an average for the entire cpu since it Is central to the die. Hotspot is a per core sensor and there's multiple of those, I think 24 of them on an 8 core cpu. So core #0 could hit 90, all other cores read 60, but the package will pickup radiated heat from #0 but be tempered by the others, so read 70. Socket being under the cpu in that unpinned center section.

All accurate, in their respective areas, but choosing Hotspot over Package means you'd see 90 and freak out that the cpu was overheating, when it's actually not, just 1 core is running hot because of the load. And that load moves, doesn't stay on #0, it'll bounce around as scheduling allows.
It does not work this way anymore. Both Intel and AMD translate the temperature of the hottest core as "package" now. Open HWinfo. Run it. Look at the individual core temps and the "CPU" or "Package" temp. It will be exactly the same as whatever the hottest core is. This has been changed for "safety" purposes. I know for a fact Intel has made this change and I'm pretty damn certain that Igor from Igor's lab said AMD has as well. Also 1usmus.
 

Karadjgne

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****! They gotta quit changing definitions and use different wording. For safety. BS. Shoulda just left package as it was, the centralized cpu reading, and used the hottest core and called it Cpu Temp. Using the same word applied in a different way isn't safe at all.

Thanks for the update anyway 👍

That just got confusing. Ran CB20 single, Coretemp resulted in 59°. HWINFO read Cpu(Tctl/Tdie) at @ 59°, Cpu Die (average) 58°, Cpu CCD1 (Tdie) 60° and hottest core of 8 bounced around 55°-56°.

But that's a 3700x.

So @Darkbreeze , since you seem up to date, and I'm sadly lacking, how is that going to apply now? Just for 12th gen/5000 series and future? , or is it software based and that's how readers are treat all cpus prior? With package temps now reading as 'cpu temp'
 
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Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
It's software based. HWinfo, CPUID readers, etc. are instructed, based on Intel spec, to read that way, so code is that way, from what I know anyhow. Also, hardware reporting is HARD that way as well now to the best of my knowledge. I'd like to get better answers, but I can never get Igor or any of the others to give me real answers, only Computronix, who is the best dude ever, and he's really just an Intel guy, but I'll see what he has to say on that because he is a great source as a mentor. Very smart dude and knows wtf he is talking about.
 

Karadjgne

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CT is awesome!
But yes, definitive answers would be nice, especially since this affects supposedly every cpu and it's read temps, it's going to change everyone's perception when they suddenly see potentially large changes, which don't actually change anything.
 

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