Question Anyone know where to find a list of various CPU min (idling) and max power stats that is NOT just list of TDP (which isnt quite the same thing)? TIA

May 22, 2023
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TDP stats are easy to find but idling power draws seem to be a manufacturer's secret now. Any help gratefully received!
 
Intel CPUs do not report measured power consumption. They only report a power consumption estimate and the only purpose of this estimate is to control the turbo boost function. I would not use this estimated number to judge how much power an Intel CPU is consuming when it is mostly idle. That is not the purpose of this calculated data.

Here is an example of a 10 core Intel CPU running all 10 cores at 5000 MHz and only consuming 1.4W when idle. That probably beats some low power laptops. Do I believe that calculated number? Not really.

View: https://imgur.com/YukvXjv
 
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The problem is "idling" means different things to different systems. The idle power draw on a system with a bog standard Windows install with nothing else on it sitting there for half an hour is different than mine where I have several background programs running.

You can specify a TDP because that's a maximum limit you don't want the CPU to go over.
 
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I can't think of anyone that keeps this data in one place. I think techpower up does a total system power at idle and during work tasks. When you directly compare a few models you can get a feel for how much idle power there must be coming from the CPU.

Recently I think Intel CPUs have better idle power consumption than AMD. The explanation given was that they are running a lot more silicon at idle because of the chiplets + infinity fabric vs the currently monolithic Intel designs.
 
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May 22, 2023
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10
The problem is "idling" means different things to different systems. The idle power draw on a system with a bog standard Windows install with nothing else on it sitting there for half an hour is different than mine where I have several background programs running.

You can specify a TDP because that's a maximum limit you don't want the CPU to go over.
I'm working on a project to optimise energy usage across distributed grids, and the proposed algo requires these min (and max) stats. Min is assuming no background processes at all - eg. as low as it can get from being just switched on, and max is the most it will ever pull. If we can infer this data from TDP figures, then that might also work - but only if all CPUs follow the same 'conversion formula', for want of a better term. It's really strange that this data isn't just routinely made public from Intel and AMD
 
I'm working on a project to optimise energy usage across distributed grids, and the proposed algo requires these min (and max) stats. Min is assuming no background processes at all - eg. as low as it can get from being just switched on, and max is the most it will ever pull. If we can infer this data from TDP figures, then that might also work - but only if all CPUs follow the same 'conversion formula', for want of a better term. It's really strange that this data isn't just routinely made public from Intel and AMD
And that's why there's no data on it, because there isn't a standard, well defined meaning of "idle." If we take your example for example, the answer is basically 0. The CPU isn't drawing any power at all. Something on the motherboard is kinda sitting there waiting for the power button to be pressed so it can go start up the system.

You're going to have to make up your own meaning that's reasonable and repeatable.
 
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If we can infer this data from TDP figures
That is not a good idea when using Intel CPUs. The TDP spec is at the base frequency with Intel Turbo Boost disabled. Almost every Intel CPU uses turbo boost so the TDP rating is not a good indicator of actual power consumption.

The type of software you run has a big impact on power consumption. Software like Prime95 uses mostly AVX2 instructions. This program uses a lot more power compared to other software that does not use any AVX instructions.
 
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That is not a good idea when using Intel CPUs. The TDP spec is at the base frequency with Intel Turbo Boost disabled. Almost every Intel CPU uses turbo boost so the TDP rating is not a good indicator of actual power consumption.
Not true, intel gives both TDP values the one for high load at base clocks and the one for high load at max turbo, which every reviewer promptly ignores.
Also turbo keeps working fine even on base power.
For the 13900k :
Processor Base Power
125 W
Maximum Turbo Power
253 W

In each mode, the Intel® Turbo Boost Technology 2.0 power limits are reprogrammed along with a new OS controlled frequency range. The Intel Dynamic Tuning driver assists in Processor Base Power (a.k.a TDP) operation by adjusting processor PL1 dynamically. The Assured Power (cTDP) mode does not change the maximum perprocessor IA core turbo frequency.
 
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