Question Anyone with some insight,

Feb 23, 2021
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Hi all

Looking to upgrade my old Pc and will use the X570 chipset on a Gigabyte Auros pro mobo as I am not into gaming. My question is will prices fall next year when AMD moves from the AM4 to AM5 socket and PCI 4 becomes PCI 5 or is this just general gosip and don't hold your breath? Prices do seem a bit high at present.
 
What does Gigabyte X570 Aorus Pro have to do with gaming?
Motherboards are not designed to do only one thing.
What are your current pc specs?
Budget?
About the prices, probably, as the new gen comes out, its normal that the price of previous gen falls.
 
Feb 23, 2021
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About the prices, probably, as the new gen comes out, its normal that the price of previous gen falls.
Thats what I am hoping for, but is the new AM5 still on track, for me the current technology is more than adequate but we all like to spend less.

What does Gigabyte X570 Aorus Pro have to do with gaming?
What I am saying is that this is the mobo I am looking at, probably many would not even even consider it for gaming but that is not an issue for me. I use my machine as a general office machine, 2D CAD with occasional 3D and for embeded programming projects. My reason for this board is that I have used Gigabyte boards since the year 2000 with no issues at all and have always supported AMD so looking at a 3900X processor, as for the rest questions will follow.
 
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What are the specs of the pc you want to upgrade.
What is the objective of such an upgrade?
What is your budget, and where might you shop?

To answer your question...
In a year or two, there will be new components from both Intel and AMD.
The list prices will result in better price/performance over the previous generation.
(Otherwise, why introduce anything at all?)
Market supply and demand will determine what the prices will be as well as availability.

Such techs as pcie 4/5 and DDR4/5 are really not that important from a performance point of view.

For your use, I would think first of all about using a SSD if you have not yet done so.
If you will upgrade your processor, look to the ryzen 5000 series with improved performance per clock.
Perhaps 19%
I see little use for the 24 threads of a 3900X processor.
Only if you have a batch app that can keep all threads running.
Quickness in a desktop is mainly because of single thread performance.
I might add that today, intel 11th gen is also similarly competitive.
 
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Schlachtwolf

Respectable
My own feeling is the first Gen of AM5 with DDR5 etc. will be left alone by many with the mature AM4 socket. Remember first Gen AM4 and all the teething problems with Bios, memory support etc.... I will defo skip it and maybe look to the second Gen on AM5 once the inevitable issues get ironed out. Therefore I believe that when AM5 first comes out AM4 will not drop very much in price as it is a tested and stable platform more suited to those workplaces etc that prize stability over cutting edge tech. Once 2nd Gen AM5 appears in 23-24 then prices will drop a fair bit for AM4.
 
Feb 23, 2021
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I see little use for the 24 threads of a 3900X processor
Thats really good info, I am looking to use a WD M.2 SSD on PCIe 4 as this will give me much higher R/W speeds, and a good increase in performance. I originaly looked at the 3600X with 6 cores and 12 threads but then for some reason went overkill with both current need and future proofing by thinking 12 cores and 24 threads. You have made me think about multi threading and the programs I use, so spent time having a good look into this and for me the CPU speed is going to give more returns than cores as most of my software uses mostly a single core so the 3600X would be fine.
 
Ryzen 5000 series have improved performance per clock.
Some 19% claimed.
Ditto for Intel 11th gen I5 and higher.
Look up the passmark performance numbers of whatever processor you are considering.
For example 3600X has 12 threads and a rating of 18327/2677 with the 2677 being for single thread performance.
By comparison R5-5600X with 12 threads is 22191/3382.

If 5600s is too pricey,
Intel I5-11600K with 12 threads is 19694/3348

On the ssd, do not count on seeing much improved performance with pcie.
Most of the benefit of any ssd is small random I/O
Synthetic sequential benchmarks look impressive but do not translate to remarkable performance.
There are some videos demonstrating load times with various devices,
Once you have a ssd, any ssd, performance differences are minimal.
 
Feb 23, 2021
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Hi

It is amazing how things have changed and it is starting to feel like going back to uni as I was reasonably Ok when we had the North and South bridge configuration but take your eyes of the ball and you get left behind and it has been a long time since the 286 and DOS so you would have thought there was less potential for change that delivers real performance increases, sounds like there is too much emphasis being placed on SSD cards running PCIe4 compared to just SATA 3.
 
PCIE4 is, today, mostly marketing.

Here is a study:

Sequential synthetic benchmarks are one thing, but the reality is not so great a difference, so long as you have a ssd and not a HDD.

There is considerable benefit from any of the ssd devices compared to HDD.
But, the difference between normal sata and pcie4 devices is perhaps a second or two.
 
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larsv8

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Jan 24, 2013
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Hard to imagine motherboards getting cheaper.

Their are pallets of unmoveable mobos right no.

Manufacturers are forcing retailers to buy boards in orders to get GPUs. Retailers like Newegg in turn are forcing basically anyone to buy a mobo who lands a GPU.

Havent checked the secondary market but I have to imagine its flooded with them.
 
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Schlachtwolf

Respectable
Hard to imagine motherboards getting cheaper.

Their are pallets of unmoveable mobos right no.

Manufacturers are forcing retailers to buy boards in orders to get GPUs. Retailers like Newegg in turn are forcing basically anyone to buy a mobo who lands a GPU.

Havent checked the secondary market but I have to imagine its flooded with them.
Here in Germany the Mid-Budget boards you can get 1/2 price on E-Bay as the people who "bought" the GPU dump the extras, same for TTake, Corsair Midrange etc PSU's. The highend boards like a Crossahair or Formula are still 400+€, but basically nearly all Intel boards and B550 and lower on AMD are getting very good value right now.
 
Feb 23, 2021
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I was looking to upgrade an old Pc that has not been used in a while but has a good tower case, it ran a 6 core AMD Phenom II X6 1090T Black Edition in an AM3 socket but only had USB 2 and DDR 800 and to keep the current Pc going a while longer, its a 4 core A8 5600K in an FM2 socket but so slow now that it is running Windows 10 and not really worth upgrading to A10 even if you could get one with more memory.
 

iPeekYou

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Don't hold your breath, OP. PCIe 4.0 is nice, but far from must have. PCIe 5.0, even more so. The jump to AM5 is, while interesting, personally doesn't get me excited. AM4 chips are great as they are with Zen 3 being the creme de la creme. Zen 2 is weaker, yes, but still very good performers. Heck, some people still run 6th gen Intel as we're speaking right now. Ivy Bridge is still alive in some markets, as well.

The 11th gen Intels are nice, just don't get the top-end chips. 11600K is ballers, but any higher and you'll understand why 10th gen parts see some spark after the 11700K and 11900K reviews come out.

Plus, as a techie, I never suggested anyone to wait for new CPU platforms to drop. GPUs, maybe, depending on the new gen. You buy a PC when you need a PC. If you want a new PC, then maybe wait. With prices of CPUs and GPUs hiking even at MSRP, there's also virtue in patience to save up in the meantime.
 
Feb 23, 2021
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The info provided on this thread has been very helpful, probably saved me money and I am thinking that the tech reached a very good performance point for the majority of users but they have pushed forward to even higher performance levels that many of us do not need. Been reading /catching up on this newer tech and it is all to easy to overspec/overspend on an upgrade. Putting my engineering head on, then sticking with AM4 is a very good option as it is proven and will look at a ZEN 3 CPU. I had looked at the 3900X but on advice here I realised I do not need that many cores so looked at the 3600X, then the 3600 as the difference is to marginal for the extra cost and now will look at Gen 3, just for future proofing and will look at a 5600X.
 

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