[SOLVED] Anyway to calibrate a budget monitor?

Jun 26, 2020
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I recently bought an Acer V227Q bip IPS. Nice monitor, but I noticed that it produces a different shade of blue than my other devices (saturation is a little lacking as well). I tried adjusting gamma, color levels, etc. but the blues still look a little different.

Is there anyway to calibrate the monitor for more accurate colors? I could buy calibration hardware, but I'm kind of worried that it wouldn't make much of a difference.
 

hang-the-9

Titan
Moderator
I'm using an MSI GeForce RTX 2060 Super GPU. I haven't downloaded any software from Acer or used the Windows 10 built in calibration tool. The V227Q supports HDMI and Display Port; I'm using HDMI because the gamma levels appear too dark with DP.

There are a ton of color changing options, from color bias, color hue, black level boost (from 0 to 10), gamma adjustment (1.8, 2.2, and 2.4), HDMI black level adjustment (which doesn't seem to do anything), brightness, contrast, color temp, etc.

I do own a BenQ GW2280 VA panel. I compared the two and they actually produce a similar shade of blue. I prefer the Acer because it's IPS and produces darker blacks and richer colors.

I'm just concerned that the monitor is being color accurate. The photos that I've had saved for a long time are displaying different shades of blue and I'm not sure if they're more accurate, or need some kind of calibration.
There is an issue with things being "accurate" with colors, the only way to compare it to the true color is to be actually looking at the item in real life with your eyes and comparing with what you see on the screen. You can also use hardware to actually look at the colors and compare to a known good standard already calibrated. Even looking at an object in your room you may not get a "real" color accuracy due to your room lights. Outside, that also depends on time of day and the atmosphere conditions, smoke, haze, clouds, temperature, moisture scattering light, etc...

So you have this photo, how do you know any colors in it are "correct" to real life? If you print it, how it looks depends on the printer and the original file color information, if you look at it on a computer it will look different depending on the monitor, lighting, even the type of video card and connection type and driver version you use.

If you are not a professional photographer or graphic artist, don't worry too much about the accuracy of the screen or if your saved photos are perfect. And if you are a pro artists, then you should be looking into calibration equipment for your screens and printers.
 

Ralston18

Titan
Moderator
For the time being set aside purchasing any "calibration hardware".

[Note: I believe that you meant software vs "hardware".]

Even if there is software to calibrate hardware the matter may be moot if the hardware involved (iGPU or GPU) is not able to respond to or support your, or anyone else's, perception of blue.

How did you or what did you use to make the shading./color adjustments?

Check the monitor's User Guide/Manual for direct monitor menus options to adjust color.

Check Acer's website for any monitor drivers and add-on apps to adjust colors/saturation.

GPU: Make and model? Any configuration software installed? Right-clicking an empty area of the desktop should open an applicable Control Panel.

The key is to identify what is available with respect to adjusting the monitor to a color of blur that you (subjectively) identify as being blue.
 
Jun 26, 2020
26
0
30
0
For the time being set aside purchasing any "calibration hardware".

[Note: I believe that you met software vs "hardware".]

Even if there is software to calibrate hardware the matter may be moot if the hardware involved (iGPU or GPU) is not able to respond to or support your, or anyone else's, perception of blue.

How did you or what did you use to make the shading./color adjustments?

Check the monitor's User Guide/Manual for direct monitor menus options to adjust color.

Check Acer's website for any monitor drivers and add-on apps to adjust colors/saturation.

GPU: Make and model? Any configuration software installed? Right-clicking an empty area of the desktop should open an applicable Control Panel.

The key is to identify what is available with respect to adjusting the monitor to a color of blur that you (subjectively) identify as being blue.
I'm using an MSI GeForce RTX 2060 Super GPU. I haven't downloaded any software from Acer or used the Windows 10 built in calibration tool. The V227Q supports HDMI and Display Port; I'm using HDMI because the gamma levels appear too dark with DP.

There are a ton of color changing options, from color bias, color hue, black level boost (from 0 to 10), gamma adjustment (1.8, 2.2, and 2.4), HDMI black level adjustment (which doesn't seem to do anything), brightness, contrast, color temp, etc.

I do own a BenQ GW2280 VA panel. I compared the two and they actually produce a similar shade of blue. I prefer the Acer because it's IPS and produces darker blacks and richer colors.

I'm just concerned that the monitor is being color accurate. The photos that I've had saved for a long time are displaying different shades of blue and I'm not sure if they're more accurate, or need some kind of calibration.
 

hang-the-9

Titan
Moderator
I'm using an MSI GeForce RTX 2060 Super GPU. I haven't downloaded any software from Acer or used the Windows 10 built in calibration tool. The V227Q supports HDMI and Display Port; I'm using HDMI because the gamma levels appear too dark with DP.

There are a ton of color changing options, from color bias, color hue, black level boost (from 0 to 10), gamma adjustment (1.8, 2.2, and 2.4), HDMI black level adjustment (which doesn't seem to do anything), brightness, contrast, color temp, etc.

I do own a BenQ GW2280 VA panel. I compared the two and they actually produce a similar shade of blue. I prefer the Acer because it's IPS and produces darker blacks and richer colors.

I'm just concerned that the monitor is being color accurate. The photos that I've had saved for a long time are displaying different shades of blue and I'm not sure if they're more accurate, or need some kind of calibration.
There is an issue with things being "accurate" with colors, the only way to compare it to the true color is to be actually looking at the item in real life with your eyes and comparing with what you see on the screen. You can also use hardware to actually look at the colors and compare to a known good standard already calibrated. Even looking at an object in your room you may not get a "real" color accuracy due to your room lights. Outside, that also depends on time of day and the atmosphere conditions, smoke, haze, clouds, temperature, moisture scattering light, etc...

So you have this photo, how do you know any colors in it are "correct" to real life? If you print it, how it looks depends on the printer and the original file color information, if you look at it on a computer it will look different depending on the monitor, lighting, even the type of video card and connection type and driver version you use.

If you are not a professional photographer or graphic artist, don't worry too much about the accuracy of the screen or if your saved photos are perfect. And if you are a pro artists, then you should be looking into calibration equipment for your screens and printers.
 
Jun 26, 2020
26
0
30
0
So you have this photo, how do you know any colors in it are "correct" to real life? If you print it, how it looks depends on the printer and the original file color information, if you look at it on a computer it will look different depending on the monitor, lighting, even the type of video card and connection type and driver version you use.
I took your advice and ordered a high quality photo. The monitor is displaying accurate colors. They're not perfect obviously, but it is more accurately than my other displays.
 

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