AOC C3583FQ 35-inch Curved Ultra-Wide FreeSync Monitor Review

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psycher1

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Lost me at 1080. I don't care about the size at that point, 1080 anything shouldn't be above $300 today.

And at 35''? With this, you're going to get $600 of near CRT size pixels. I have a 27'' ($250) and, with it on my desk in front of me, pixels are already easily defined. In game as well, it's the one element holding back my otherwise stunning experience in W3 right now.
Add another 8'' to that, without enhancing the resolution, it'd be too much.

The only benefit I can see is if you sit far away from the screen (e.g. couch on the other side of the room) and watch movies with people (using something like VLC to zoom already 21:9 movies to fill the screen).
 

realibrad

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You guys realize this is not a 1920x1080 monitor right? This monitor has 33% more pixles than a 1080 monitor. If you dont think 33% is a big enough jump, then realize that a 1440 (2560x1440) is only 33% above this monitory.

So, those who say things like 1080 whaaaaa, just know that you do not know what you are talking about. If the height matters so much to you, I would gladly sell you my 1920 monitor...*rotates monitor 90 degrees.
 

ohim

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@BIBBIT You can use it without issues on an Nvidia card, you just won`t benefit from the FreeSync specs.

the monitor is a failure due to resolution, 35" and 2560*1080 is very poor.
My 21:9 34" LG monitor has 3440x1440 ~ 110 ppi
a typical 24" 1080 screen has ~91 ppi
this monitor has 79 ppi

The resolution is crap, you`ll be able to see the individual pixels on the monitor while working on it ... i wouldn`t recommend this monitor to anybody.
 

Sam Hain

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Concerns with 1080p can be negated with DSR settings (2k & 4k sim-rez) when gaming and it's FREE... It's a relatively SIMPLE setup-process that produces pretty decent results and for $600, you can't complain about that.

If a 1080p monitor were placed in DSR x1.78 and the markings were removed from the monitor and a game were running on it, with appropriate graphics settings applied to the corresponding GPU, you'd have a hard time distinguishing it from an actual 1440p monitor or a 4k one for that matter when DSR'd.

Pixel density... Unless you're sitting within 18 inches or have your mug right up on the monitor, you're not going to notice this when it's in 1080p on the desktop, web, word-processing, programs, etc.

My .02 cents... Spend your $1K on a monitor that WILL have glow issues while this monitor will allow $400 to be applied elsewhere in a system/upgrades or a GPU upgrade down the road and still have performance to match that the naked eye may or may not be able to discern.
 

qazphilby

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How about support for multiple inputs, can it display multiple inputs at a time either SBS or PIP? Or is it one input at a time
 

sillynilly

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This is a pixelated mess! I have played on this panel and it's a no go. I find it hard to believe the TH staff wasted afternoons on this monitor. I personally like the large, curved displays, but at a proper resolution - one where I don't see dots. Bad review from an otherwise decent reviewer.
 

loki1944

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Gotta say I think I'm done with paying anything over $300 for a monitor; I've got 1440p 144hz and 1080p 144hz monitors, and I've come to the realization that for me a 32-43 inch 1080p TV works just fine (and sometimes have better colors than my TN variety monitors). Actually while overseas using the hotel Samsung 40 inch TV I never pined for a return to my expensive 1440p monitors. And you can always DSR/VSR 1080p TVs/monitors. $600 for what this is offering just isn't worth it at this point in my opinion.
 

psycher1

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I love hearing that I don't know what I'm talking about when I'm a very, very vocal ultrawide supporter. I didn't explicitely say that mine was 1080 ultrawide, but there it is. Text isn't as smooth as you'd expect and pixels are indeed visible.

Ok, sure. The experience isn't ruined in game. But, certain games running at high enough resolutions do indeed get benefits from running higher resolutions. Sure, DSR will help fake it to an extent.
My main problem here is the price. My 27'' 1080 ultrawide is less than half of this monitor. The extra size does include some extra materials, but the screen itself should be cheaper to produce. The curve does indeed introduce some engineering challenges, but it's not by any means new tech at this point, the industry has had a few years now to refine it's approach. There's the debate then, do those things added together rationalize an extra 140% of the cost extra on top of a monitor that will give you mostly the same experience?
 


Because it's ultrawide it's the same PPI as a 28" 1080P display at 16:9. While that's certainly sitting at the bottom of the charts PPI wise, it's still comparable to other gaming displays out there and would offer very similar pixel density to the many 1080P 27" displays floating around on the market. It would be terrible for any sort of productivity work and certainly not my choice for a display, but gaming is quite a different story. Most people with sub 20-20 vision will trade PPI for display size any day... I've lost count of the number of people who've gotten annoyed at me for "making everything small" on their monitor when I set it to the native resolution.

In any case, while it wouldn't be my choice, there is IMHO a place on the market for displays like this that offer a pretty compelling gaming experience for people who are happy to sacrifice PPI for the price (relative), size, curve and high frequency.
 

Brian McG

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I just don't get this whole curved screen thing. They take up more room and just distort the picture at the edges. Just think about it. When the picture was originally taken it was projected onto a flat surface of some kind. So if you bend the edges of the picture towards you, they will appear larger than they were in the original scene. Why bother? Just because you can? Or is it because if you do you can put the price up? Isn't marketing wonderful>
 

galta

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It does not matter if it is 2560 x 1080, as opposed to 1920 x 1080, and therefore has +30% more pixels than a regular 1080p monitor. Because of its geometry (21:9) it is approximately as tall as a 16:9 27" monitor.
The question is what are your thoughts about a +27" 16:9 monitor @1080p. If you think is fine, then probably you are goingo to enjoy this one; otherwise, not.
As of we, I get the feeling that some pixels do miss.
 


Have you ever used one for a decent gaming session? It might change your mind. I use Eyefinity across three screens where I can (my ageing graphics card is increasingly unable to handle it). I'm a big fan when it works, and I'll always putthe outer displays on an angle to create a sort-of (blocky) curve. If you look specifically at the outer half of the outside monitors the picture is massively distorted in most games. The thing is that you very rarely notice it at all. Our eyes are actually pretty terrible at picking up detail and perspective in our peripheral vision. But, having some content filling the peripheral vision makes a significant difference to the level of immersion, at least in my experience. It's particularly effective for the standard first and third person games where the mouse/controller is in charge of your vision. In those cases if you notice something in your peripheral vision that you want to "look at", your game-tuned brain just automatically moves the mouse/controller to look at it, while your head always stays focused on the middle screen. It's a bit more noticeable in something like a racer as you approach a hairpin bend for example. In that case you often do look directly at the outer monitors to line up the corner.

For a curved TV, where you sit well back from, I really don't see the point. But for an ultra-wide gaming monitor, I would absolutely prefer it to envelop me, even if that does exacerbate the distortion at the outer edges of the display.
 

bpbarrette

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Thanks. I'm wondering if it will at least work better than a non-FreeSync / non-GSync monitor.

 

rgd1101

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depend on how close you sit to the monitor.
 
Sep 13, 2014
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Price-wise it will have to compete against the LG 34UC79G soon.
This panel sadly has a couple of slow G2G and C2C pixel transitions. But it won't show up in your tests because you only measure the B2W response time, which gives an incomplete picture.
 
Brian MCG,
Monitors are curved because when they get too wide they actually DISTORT the information. Yes, the image may have been FLAT originally but that only works okay if the relative size is SMALL compared to your viewing angle.

The WIDER the screen gets, the more the data gets distorted, thus we curve the monitor so it angles more towards our eyes.

*So you have it BACKWARDS slightly. We need CURVED to avoid distortion, not flat.
 


I wonder if Nvidia will take their "Simultaneous Multi Projection" tech a bit further in a future gen such that it can actually properly map the correct curve onto a curved display. If the card knows the display size, curve and standard position of your head, then a bit of geometry should allow it to properly render the image without distortion. It's basically what SMP does for 3 screen surround (requires game support), but with the added complexity of a curved display rather than three flat images. Given that curved displays are increasingly becoming more common (and are likely already significantly more common than 3 screen surround setups), we may well see something like that in future.
 
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