[SOLVED] Apps don't run as 'administrator'

omnilicious

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Dec 7, 2011
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I looked at similar posts and the solutions don't seem to exist for me.

What I've tried so far:

Obvious first step for me was to right-click>properties>compatibility>run as administrator.

Kept popping up the dialogue box if it's okay to run this program.

Second step right-click>properties>advanced>run as administrator.

No change, dialogue continues to pop up.

Searched for "Local Users and Groups" after making sure my account was administrator (standard account not even a choosable option with my account), but Local Users and Groups doesn't exist in Computer Management.

This is where I'm stuck. If I turn off UAC notifications altogether, it goes away - but the point is that I want to see the pop-up for unfamiliar programs that want to run on my PC or programs that I haven't specifically marked to run as admin.

Thanks for any help in advance.
 

Eximo

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Only other thing I can think of is to delete your user profile and make a new one. Copy the contents of your user folder to a backup location, delete it, reboot and log back in. Should create a new set of folders. You can move anything back you want to keep.

If that doesn't work, I suggest re-installing Windows. This is the type of problem you can spend a lot of time troubleshooting and get nowhere. Doesn't seem to be any clues as to what is causing it. Were it limited to a single program I would blame the program. But if it is most programs, then something broader is at issue.

Program Files is technically a folder on the root of the drive, but not really what I was talking about. This would be making a new folder on the drive, and removing all access requirements. This doesn't really apply to already installed games though. That advice applied to a single troublesome application, which was the impression I got from your post.
 

Eximo

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Are other programs appropriately getting permissions? Have you tried installing this program to a folder on the root of the drive, and changing permissions on the folder? Is this an older program?

Pretty common to need a compatibility shim, such as run as administrator, to run older software. But sometimes you have to go farther.

Microsoft's Application Compatibility Toolkit (part of the Windows Assessment and Deployment Kit now (ADK)) will let you add additional shims to a troublesome application.

The most two common to add would be Run as Highest, and Elevate Create Process. Some applications fail because of the registry being too new for it to understand. In this case you can turn on a Virtual Registry. Been a while, but I think there is also an option for virtual folders where it can bypass the need of some software for a Documents and Settings folder, such as in XP.

If that isn't it, I would consider checking your system for Malware.
 

omnilicious

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Dec 7, 2011
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The only programs that don't trigger the warning are games that I launch from the launchers, but if I launch them from their shortcuts they get the popup. New and old. I haven't tried putting anything in a root folder (is that just C:/Progam Files?) mostly because games won't install/run there anymore. Most things are in C:/Docments or D:/(game folder)

I do have most of my apps installed on a secondary drive (D) with larger storage than my main drive (C). speedfan is one of the most annoying apps as I run it on and off, but it is installed in my main drive.
 

Eximo

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Ambassador
Only other thing I can think of is to delete your user profile and make a new one. Copy the contents of your user folder to a backup location, delete it, reboot and log back in. Should create a new set of folders. You can move anything back you want to keep.

If that doesn't work, I suggest re-installing Windows. This is the type of problem you can spend a lot of time troubleshooting and get nowhere. Doesn't seem to be any clues as to what is causing it. Were it limited to a single program I would blame the program. But if it is most programs, then something broader is at issue.

Program Files is technically a folder on the root of the drive, but not really what I was talking about. This would be making a new folder on the drive, and removing all access requirements. This doesn't really apply to already installed games though. That advice applied to a single troublesome application, which was the impression I got from your post.
 

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