Arctic Cooling Introduces AMD Threadripper-Ready All-In-One Coolers

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jimmysmitty

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It will be interesting to see how well AMDs 180w TDP CPU can be cooled, I just wonder if it will require a AiO minimum for proper cooling or not. I also assume the OCing will be slightly lower than Ryzen, as is with most CPUs with more cores comes lower clock speed.
 


Rumor has it that the cooler that will come with Threadripper CPUs is an AiO.
 

Xajel

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Those spec are confusing, why would you repeat a single fan spec on all variants !!, airflow, noise & power consumption should all change as we move from 120 to 240 & 360
 

ZRace

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I think the static pressure those fans can create is far more interesting than airflow here, since we're talking about water cooling.
 
It will be interesting to see how well AMDs 180w TDP CPU can be cooled, I just wonder if it will require a AiO minimum for proper cooling or not. I also assume the OCing will be slightly lower than Ryzen, as is with most CPUs with more cores comes lower clock speed.
I wouldn't be so sure about that -- I suspect AMD 'binned' for Epyc and TR, and whatever missed the grade was passed on to desktop Ryzen.

And, as Paul pointed out in another thread --> TR is not a monolithic die, it is a 'glued' MCM as Chipzilla derisively pointed out whereby two processors simply exist side-by-side under the same lid.

That will certainly make OC'ing interesting depending upon their integration.

The other thing: The early Epyc power consumption numbers look really good, i.e., "Less Power = Less Heat"

 

jimmysmitty

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Even though it is a MCM design heat will still play a part and OCing will be limited due to more cores. Core 2 Duo normally OCed slightly, or greatly depending on the CPU and your lottery results, better than Core 2 Quad. Most C2Qs on 45nm would top out near 4GHz while C2D would top out at 4.5GHz, 5GHz if you were very luck and could afford a super nice water cooling setup.

I can't find anything solid enough on power use for Epyc to make an educated guess. Only found some numbers based on the 760, which is a 32 core part. The closest part for AMD to the 16 core TR is the 7351. However there are differences between them, mainly in clock speed. The 7351 has a base of 2.4GHz with a boost to 2.9GHz. The 1950X will have a base clock of 3.4GHz and a boost to 4GHz. That is a 1GHz base gap and 1.1GHz boost clock gap and that can make a world of difference in power use. That makes sense though as servers are not as sensitive to clock speed and benefit from more cores.

The 7351 is also a 155W TDP part by default with the ability to be put into 170W while the 1950X is a straight 180W TDP part.

While the server chips can entertain some ideas as to how it may perform but I doubt we will see thermal and power draw numbers of the desktop TR match what the closest EPYC CPU will do.

The current rumor, as stated above, is that TR will come with a water cooling solution. To me that means they don't expect the majority of air coolers to be able to dissipate the heat of the 16 core fast enough, and I don't either.



You mean like how a lot of coolers have a round plate for the current square CPUs?



The cooler plate is probably designed to cover where the CPU actually is and where the majority of heat will be. No CPU is the size of the IHS. The majority of heat will build up and be dissipated from the center of the packaging. A cooler by no means has to cover the entire package to properly dissipate heat, otherwise we wouldn't have the round cooling plate coolers with square CPU packages.
 
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