[SOLVED] Arctic Freezer II 240/280 in Define R5

Aug 4, 2021
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I have a question about AIO cooling for my pc.
I currently have a Define R5, and want to go with a Arctic Freezer II 280, but I have seen JayzTwoCents video about how you should install a AIO. I want to install it in the front, bc I dont think there is any place for it in the top.
And every picture I have seen with people using a 280 AIO in the R5, and it looks like the pump is higher up than the rad. Is it gonna big problem?

Example picture:
 

Phaaze88

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If you still choose to go that route(front), air will make it's way into the pump. The pump should be lubricated at all times.
As it is in the picture, that is not ideal if you want the unit to last - AIOs/CLCs already aren't known for their longevity.
It also makes more noise like this too, and will get worse as fluid slowly permeates the tubes over time.

Short version: worse performance, noisier, and earlier death.
 

Phaaze88

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If you still choose to go that route(front), air will make it's way into the pump. The pump should be lubricated at all times.
As it is in the picture, that is not ideal if you want the unit to last - AIOs/CLCs already aren't known for their longevity.
It also makes more noise like this too, and will get worse as fluid slowly permeates the tubes over time.

Short version: worse performance, noisier, and earlier death.
 
Aug 4, 2021
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Yeah, thats what I thought. Should take some measurements and look if it fits in the top, or just go with a 240
 

Phaaze88

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See if it fits up top, but the odds are against you: https://www.fractal-design.com/products/cases/define/define-r5/blackout/
Top radiator
420, 360, 280, 240, 140 or 120mm
A thickness limitation of 55 mm for both radiator + fan applies on 420, 280 and 140 mm radiators; 420 and 360 mm radiators require removal of the ODD bay

The LF II radiators are 38mm thick. Combined with the 25mm standard thickness for fans, and you're over by 8mm for the LF II 280.
The specs don't warn against the 240mm though.
 
Aug 4, 2021
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Is there a lot of difference between 240 and 280? I have heard that the 120 fans make some more sound than the 140. And I think the Kraken x63 is just 55 mm thick with the fans. But it is 50$ more expensive than the LF II here. If there isnt much difference with a 240 than a 280, with sounds and cooling effect. I think I go for a LF II 240 or ... maybe just maybe a 360, since the price difference on the LF II 240 and 360 is just 20$

But is there that much air in an AiO that it is very bad to have it in the front and the pump get higher up than the rad? since isnt it usually very little air in them?
 

rubix_1011

Contributing Writer
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140mm x 280mm x 38mm = 1,489,600mm^3
120mm x 240mm x 38mm = 1,094,400mm^3

You can only count on the radiator volume, the fan spacing is there only for clearance. This is also very basic based on the fan sizes alone, and does not account for the end tanks, which add additional volume. True volume would need to be taken from examples themselves .
(had to edit because I can't math today)

So, about 395,200 cubic millimeters difference of total volume, so it is substantial.

Any cooler using the 280 or 420 size uses 140mm fans rather than 120mm fans, so an added +20cm length + width for each fan size.
 
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Phaaze88

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More cooling surface area, BUT some of that is deflected by the fans used and flow rates of AIOs.

140mm fans usually are better than 120mm: can move more air at a given speed, as well as having a nicer sound profile.

IMO: 280mm is the 'sweet spot' of AIO/CLC.
360mm have more issues with compatibility - along with the issues I have with 120mm fans.
240mm just don't have enough going for them - too many short comings compared to what I consider the cooling kings, which are 140mm class air coolers and 280mm AIOs.

I wouldn't look at a 240mm if I were you. Get a 140mm class air model.
 
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Aug 4, 2021
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Ok thanks for your replies, but if I now choose to go with the 280 and put it in the front as shown in the picture at the top of the thread.
Will it significantly reduce its lifetime and cooling effect, will probably just have it for 2-3 yrs or so.
 

Phaaze88

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It could die in under a year, depending on use and abuse. I'd advise against taking the chance.
Air in the pump increases friction, which will cause parts like the impeller to run hotter, which accelerates wear and tear, and the longer this is sustained, the sooner it's all going to collapse.
 

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