[SOLVED] Arctic Liquid Freezer and Ryzen 9 5900x High Temperatures

Feb 1, 2021
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I started using the AIO called Arctic Liquid Freezer 2 420 with Ryzen 9 5900x. My computer case is Phanteks P500A DRGB. The processor runs at a constant speed of 4.6 GHz. Temperatures are between 38-42 degrees when the processor is idle. It works between 74-77 degrees when under load (cinebench R23). However, even though I used a 420mm liquid cooling, these temperatures were very interesting to me. I was expecting better performance.

First of all, I used AIO as PULL-PUSH (3x Arctic 140mm AIO fan was pushing - 3x Phanteks 140mm case fan was pulling). temperatures were 40-44 degrees at idle and 76-80 degrees under load.
Then I tried the opposite, Arctic fans pull and Phanteks fans push. Thus, I reached the values at the beginning of my article, that is, it worked 2 degrees cooler.


On the back of my case there is a 140mm Phanteks fan to act as an exhaust (same model as the case's own fans), On the top of the case there are 3 120mm fans to act as an exhaust (2x Cooler Master, 1x Corsair)

Arctic fans (pull) run at around 1500 rpm under load, while Phanteks fans (push) run at 1200-1300 rpm under load.

Are these degrees normal? My friend uses the Arctic Liquid Freezer 2 280mm AIO with the same chassis and processor, and our temperatures are the same. I did all the assemblies as suggested by the AIO manufacturer. I checked the thermal paste. I disassembled and reinstalled the entire AIO. However, nothing has changed. There are 2 possibilities, either the product is broken or a 420mm radiator is just an image and a high number. I look forward to your help and suggestions on the subject.

(Note: I am using rev.4 version of AIO.)

All my system components:

-Motherboard: Asus Tuf Gaming X570-Plus
-CPU: AMD Ryzen 9 5900x
-GPU: Msi RTX 2060 Super Gaming X
-RAM: GSKILL Trident Z Neo 2x16 32GB 3600Mhz 16CL
-SSD: Samsung 970 EVO Plus NVMe M.2 500GB
-HDD: Seagate Barracuda 2TB (ST2000DM008)
-Psu: Corsair TX 750M 80+ Gold
-CPU Cooler: Arctic Liquid Freezer II 420mm
-Case: Phanteks P500A D-RGB Black
 

Phaaze88

Titan
Ambassador
There really isn't anything wrong.
If there's a weak point with the setup above, it lies under the cpu's IHS, an area you shouldn't really touch - not without risk of breaking the cpu, at least.

None of the Ryzen 5000 cpus draw much power at all. Even with all the reports of their spiky thermals, they are very good on power consumption.
The main selling points of the massive LF II 420 is its great thermal capacity and lower noise - by being able to run fans at lower rpm with less of a performance penalty.
Since the 5900X and 5950X can struggle to break the 200w barrier at times:
https://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/amd-ryzen-9-5950x-5900x-zen-3-review/4
[^In case you wanted to know where I got 200w from.]
That's well within the LF II 420s capability to handle... but the same is true for your buddy's LF II 280.


Diminishing returns are at play, and the weakest link is not the cpu cooler.
 
Reactions: Antiseptic

Phaaze88

Titan
Ambassador
There really isn't anything wrong.
If there's a weak point with the setup above, it lies under the cpu's IHS, an area you shouldn't really touch - not without risk of breaking the cpu, at least.

None of the Ryzen 5000 cpus draw much power at all. Even with all the reports of their spiky thermals, they are very good on power consumption.
The main selling points of the massive LF II 420 is its great thermal capacity and lower noise - by being able to run fans at lower rpm with less of a performance penalty.
Since the 5900X and 5950X can struggle to break the 200w barrier at times:
https://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/amd-ryzen-9-5950x-5900x-zen-3-review/4
[^In case you wanted to know where I got 200w from.]
That's well within the LF II 420s capability to handle... but the same is true for your buddy's LF II 280.


Diminishing returns are at play, and the weakest link is not the cpu cooler.
 
Reactions: Antiseptic
I started using the AIO called Arctic Liquid Freezer 2 420 with Ryzen 9 5900x. My computer case is Phanteks P500A DRGB. The processor runs at a constant speed of 4.6 GHz. Temperatures are between 38-42 degrees when the processor is idle. It works between 74-77 degrees when under load (cinebench R23). However, even though I used a 420mm liquid cooling, these temperatures were very interesting to me. I was expecting better performance.

First of all, I used AIO as PULL-PUSH (3x Arctic 140mm AIO fan was pushing - 3x Phanteks 140mm case fan was pulling). temperatures were 40-44 degrees at idle and 76-80 degrees under load.
Then I tried the opposite, Arctic fans pull and Phanteks fans push. Thus, I reached the values at the beginning of my article, that is, it worked 2 degrees cooler.


On the back of my case there is a 140mm Phanteks fan to act as an exhaust (same model as the case's own fans), On the top of the case there are 3 120mm fans to act as an exhaust (2x Cooler Master, 1x Corsair)

Arctic fans (pull) run at around 1500 rpm under load, while Phanteks fans (push) run at 1200-1300 rpm under load.

Are these degrees normal? My friend uses the Arctic Liquid Freezer 2 280mm AIO with the same chassis and processor, and our temperatures are the same. I did all the assemblies as suggested by the AIO manufacturer. I checked the thermal paste. I disassembled and reinstalled the entire AIO. However, nothing has changed. There are 2 possibilities, either the product is broken or a 420mm radiator is just an image and a high number. I look forward to your help and suggestions on the subject.

(Note: I am using rev.4 version of AIO.)

All my system components:

-Motherboard: Asus Tuf Gaming X570-Plus
-CPU: AMD Ryzen 9 5900x
-GPU: Msi RTX 2060 Super Gaming X
-RAM: GSKILL Trident Z Neo 2x16 32GB 3600Mhz 16CL
-SSD: Samsung 970 EVO Plus NVMe M.2 500GB
-HDD: Seagate Barracuda 2TB (ST2000DM008)
-Psu: Corsair TX 750M 80+ Gold
-CPU Cooler: Arctic Liquid Freezer II 420mm
-Case: Phanteks P500A D-RGB Black
Those temps are just fine for 5900x. All Zen3, 5000 series Ryzen are allowed temps up to 90c without throttling or loosing on boost.
 
Reactions: Antiseptic
Feb 1, 2021
16
0
10
0
There really isn't anything wrong.
If there's a weak point with the setup above, it lies under the cpu's IHS, an area you shouldn't really touch - not without risk of breaking the cpu, at least.

None of the Ryzen 5000 cpus draw much power at all. Even with all the reports of their spiky thermals, they are very good on power consumption.
The main selling points of the massive LF II 420 is its great thermal capacity and lower noise - by being able to run fans at lower rpm with less of a performance penalty.
Since the 5900X and 5950X can struggle to break the 200w barrier at times:
https://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/amd-ryzen-9-5950x-5900x-zen-3-review/4
[^In case you wanted to know where I got 200w from.]
That's well within the LF II 420s capability to handle... but the same is true for your buddy's LF II 280.


Diminishing returns are at play, and the weakest link is not the cpu cooler.
Thank you for your answer. Is there an AIO (other than custom) that can run cooler than the Arctic 420mm?
 
Feb 1, 2021
16
0
10
0
Those temps are just fine for 5900x. All Zen3, 5000 series Ryzen are allowed temps up to 90c without throttling or loosing on boost.
Actually, I know these, but my request is that it works cooler. I was using the Coolermaster ML240L v2 AIO before and there is a 10-12 degree difference with the Arctic 420mm. The reason I chose a 420mm AIO is to want high performance. For example, it would be much more satisfying if the processor worked between 30-33 degrees when idle and between 60-62 degrees under load.
 
Actually, I know these, but my request is that it works cooler. I was using the Coolermaster ML240L v2 AIO before and there is a 10-12 degree difference with the Arctic 420mm. The reason I chose a 420mm AIO is to want high performance. For example, it would be much more satisfying if the processor worked between 30-33 degrees when idle and between 60-62 degrees under load.
You may be asking too much from an AIO for a CPU with so many cores, it's price to pay for so much energy being wasted thru heat.
 
Reactions: Antiseptic

Phaaze88

Titan
Ambassador
As already mentioned, AMD designed the Ryzen 5000 cpus to keep seeking out higher boost bins, even up to 90C, before dialing back down due to thermals or power consumed.
Very aggressive - of course, they're not going to infinitely pursue higher bins. The silicon can only go so far.

Is there an AIO (other than custom) that can run cooler than the Arctic 420mm?
No, the AIO market is pretty stagnant - it's much of the same ol' same ol' stuff, save for the fans being used.
If you got a recent model, you're really not missing anything.


The only other way to drastically reduce thermals is to remove some of these extra layers between the dies and the cooler - direct die cooling.
Much too risky with these soldered cpus though; easy way to destroy the
That's one advantage gpu cooling has had over cpu, as they're already direct die. More layers of thermal transfer reduce cooling efficiency.
Gpu: die - TIM - cooler cold plate
Cpu: die - TIM - IHS/heatspreader - TIM again - cooler cold plate
The IHS is there to protect the cpu, but some people still manage to destroy them anyways...



If I could shorten everything some how: Everything's fine - nothing alarming - enjoy what you've got.
 

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