Question Are all b450 motherboards capable of handling Ryzen 5 3500 after over locking?

Feb 19, 2021
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I was thinking of buying i3 10100f but the 3500 really lured me towards it because though it is a little more priced than i3, but the motherboard for it would cost less.
And I also want to overclock the ryzen 3500 and pair it with 1650 super. So since I am on a budget, I want to know that if I buy any b450 motherboard, would it be able to utilize the power 3500 has? I really don't know anything about overclocking so I really don't know what is needed in the motherboard to overclock the CPU. When I would buy them I would somehow learn to overclock from somewhere but I need to know what items to buy hence my question.
 
I was thinking of buying i3 10100f but the 3500 really lured me towards it because though it is a little more priced than i3, but the motherboard for it would cost less.
And I also want to overclock the ryzen 3500 and pair it with 1650 super. So since I am on a budget, I want to know that if I buy any b450 motherboard, would it be able to utilize the power 3500 has?
...
To answer your question: yes, most any B450 would handle a 3500X (6 cores/6 threads) CPU even when overclocking it. Most any B450 can handle a 3600, with 6 cores/12 threads, overclocked.

But I'd suggest getting one at least with a heatsink on the VRM FET's...the more substantial the better. At some point you'll want to upgrade. Getting a more capable motherboard will make that possible. When you find candidates available to you come back for better advice.
 
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Feb 19, 2021
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To answer your question: yes, most any B450 would handle a 3500X (6 cores/6 threads) CPU even when overclocking it. Most any B450 can handle a 3600, with 6 cores/12 threads, overclocked.

But I'd suggest getting one at least with a heatsink on the VRM FET's...the more substantial the better. At some point you'll want to upgrade. Getting a more capable motherboard will make that possible. When you find candidates available to you come back for better advice.
whats VRM FET? and i would upgrade my pc only after using it for like 5 years
 

Karadjgne

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You won't get much OC out of a 3500x, all the X cpus are already boosted about as high as they can go. Just set PBO and enjoy. Allowing the cpu to govern itself will allow it to give you the best, consistent results without over-extending either the cpu or the motherboard.

That said, it's an argument. 6/6 Ryzen vs 6/6 Intel. The current Intel mobo's will support the upcoming 11th Gen cpus, so there's at least a little hope there for upgrade, it's unknown if AM4 is done, or if there will be a AM4+ or AM5 for the next Zen releases, if they are even Zen architecture. Or when. It's taking Intel a good long while to come down from 14nm process and amd is already at 7nm, so exactly what the future holds is anyone's guess.

So what to do? Get a Good mobo now and upgrade the cpu in a few years? Or get a cheap, barely able to support the cpu now and dump everything in 5 years, since probably by then we'll be into DDR5. Decisions, decisions.

Personally, I'm of the opinion to forget about upgrades, get the best you can justify now, enjoy it for years, then move on. If the best is Ryzen, so be it, if it's Intel, just as good.
 
Reactions: Iamnotraiden
Feb 19, 2021
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You won't get much OC out of a 3500x, all the X cpus are already boosted about as high as they can go. Just set PBO and enjoy. Allowing the cpu to govern itself will allow it to give you the best, consistent results without over-extending either the cpu or the motherboard.

That said, it's an argument. 6/6 Ryzen vs 6/6 Intel. The current Intel mobo's will support the upcoming 11th Gen cpus, so there's at least a little hope there for upgrade, it's unknown if AM4 is done, or if there will be a AM4+ or AM5 for the next Zen releases, if they are even Zen architecture. Or when. It's taking Intel a good long while to come down from 14nm process and amd is already at 7nm, so exactly what the future holds is anyone's guess.

So what to do? Get a Good mobo now and upgrade the cpu in a few years? Or get a cheap, barely able to support the cpu now and dump everything in 5 years, since probably by then we'll be into DDR5. Decisions, decisions.

Personally, I'm of the opinion to forget about upgrades, get the best you can justify now, enjoy it for years, then move on. If the best is Ryzen, so be it, if it's Intel, just as good.
I won't buy the X, I would buy just the 3500 which does not have integrated graphics
 

Karadjgne

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Given the choice between a 3500 and a 3300x, I'd go with the 3300x. It has a slight edge in just about everything, higher speeds, more threads and generally cheaper. When pushed by PBO or OC, it comes in barely behind the 10600k, so is quite respectable.
 
Reactions: Iamnotraiden
Feb 19, 2021
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How can a 10100F and a H410 motherboard be more expensive than a 3500 and atleast a a320 motherboard?
10100F is 100$ (in some countries even less) and a H410 mobo is 60$.
In India, i3 10100f is INR 8500+ h410 is INR 6000 so total 14500
And ryzen 5 3500 is INR 12000 + a MSI b450m pro vdh max is INR 6000 but I have a friend who has a new one unopened so he would give it for INR 3000, this INR 15000 total and moreover I can use the 3200mhz capacity of my rams and even get a b450 motherboard which is somewhat of better quality.
I know I was misleading to tell about the prices as I didn't mention my friend but tbh I am really finding the AMD one more value efficient
 
Feb 19, 2021
28
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35
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You won't get much OC out of a 3500x, all the X cpus are already boosted about as high as they can go. Just set PBO and enjoy. Allowing the cpu to govern itself will allow it to give you the best, consistent results without over-extending either the cpu or the motherboard.

That said, it's an argument. 6/6 Ryzen vs 6/6 Intel. The current Intel mobo's will support the upcoming 11th Gen cpus, so there's at least a little hope there for upgrade, it's unknown if AM4 is done, or if there will be a AM4+ or AM5 for the next Zen releases, if they are even Zen architecture. Or when. It's taking Intel a good long while to come down from 14nm process and amd is already at 7nm, so exactly what the future holds is anyone's guess.

So what to do? Get a Good mobo now and upgrade the cpu in a few years? Or get a cheap, barely able to support the cpu now and dump everything in 5 years, since probably by then we'll be into DDR5. Decisions, decisions.

Personally, I'm of the opinion to forget about upgrades, get the best you can justify now, enjoy it for years, then move on. If the best is Ryzen, so be it, if it's Intel, just as good.
Does the 3500 and not 3500x also run the way you said, without overclock?
 
Feb 19, 2021
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Given the choice between a 3500 and a 3300x, I'd go with the 3300x. It has a slight edge in just about everything, higher speeds, more threads and generally cheaper. When pushed by PBO or OC, it comes in barely behind the 10600k, so is quite respectable.
Yeah but the problem is 3300x is completely out of stock everywhere here in India :(
 
whats VRM FET? and i would upgrade my pc only after using it for like 5 years
The VRM is the voltage regulator that supplies power to the CPU. The FET's are the devices that actually regulate the voltage. There are 9-12 of them, black squares lying flat to the board usually between the CPU and the I/O connectors on the back panel. Except on most boards they're covered by a heatsink so you can't see them. On some boards, usually the cheapest, they're not.

They get very hot when a CPU is working hard, the heatsink helps dissipate the heat so they don't burn up. A 3500X probably won't work hard enough to get even uncovered ones too hot. But if you ever choose to go to a faster CPU you could get in trouble really fast if they aren't.

You seem likely to keep something a while. Especially when used ones get cheap a 3700X...or even 5600X...might prove a great upgrade in a couple years. If out, new tech will still be bleeding edge expensive and not very well optimized yet.
 
Last edited:
Reactions: Iamnotraiden
Feb 19, 2021
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The VRM is the voltage regulator that supplies power to the CPU. The FET's are the devices that actually regulate the voltage. There are 9-12 of them, black squares lying flat to the board usually between the CPU and the I/O connectors on the back panel. Except on most boards they're covered by a heatsink so you can't see them. On some boards, usually the cheapest, they're not.

They get very hot when a CPU is working hard, the heatsink helps dissipate the heat so they don't burn up. A 3500X probably won't work hard enough to get even uncovered ones too hot. But if you ever choose to go to a faster CPU you could get in trouble really fast if they aren't.

You seem likely to keep something a while. Especially when used ones get cheap a 3700X...or even 5600X...might prove a great upgrade in a couple years. If out, new tech will still be bleeding edge expensive and not very well optimized yet.
Tbh, I won't upgrade my PC within atleast 4 years after I make this build. So I think buying the MSI b450m pro vdh max would suffice my wants and not go on fire right?
 
Tbh, I won't upgrade my PC within atleast 4 years after I make this build. So I think buying the MSI b450m pro vdh max would suffice my wants and not go on fire right?
It's not the greatest but that board has a heatsink on the FET's and will do just fine for a 3500X. I'd put even a 5600X on it without losing sleep.

Just do not expect much from overclocking. I agree: just enable PBO, put as good a cooler on it as you can manage and consider it done. The way the PB2 works with Zen2, cooling one well enough has the same effect as overclocking it.
 

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