Question Are ethernet adapters worth it?

Nov 17, 2020
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They do the job (i.e. get internet through your house), but a couple of caveats:
  • it is unlikely you will get your full speed
  • the places they are plugged in must be on the same wiring circuit
 
Jan 9, 2021
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They do the job (i.e. get internet through your house), but a couple of caveats:
  • it is unlikely you will get your full speed
  • the places they are plugged in must be on the same wiring circuit
Is there an easy way to see if it's on the same circuit or is it plug in and fingers crossed lol
 
Nov 17, 2020
115
18
95
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Is there an easy way to see if it's on the same circuit or is it plug in and fingers crossed lol
I'm no electrician, but I believe the smaller your house, the higher chance you're on the same circuit. in my case, I bought them and tried it. Can always return to Amazon if they don't work.
 
The new devices do not have to be on the same circuit any more. They use the grounding wire in addition to the power wires to send signals. They have much less trouble than the previous generation.

You went pretty fast on your purchase. If I or some of the other common posters on this forum you would have see a alternative recommendation for MoCA devices. If you have tv coax in both rooms you can consider these. The newest forms of this can actually get very close to 1gbit. Powerline you might get 300mbps if you are very lucky, Most people are getting in the 150-200mbps range with the top end powerline units but it depends on the house a lot.
 

gggplaya

Distinguished
There's A LOT of MISINFORMATION on this thread.

Powerline adapters do not need to be on the same circuit breaker, they need to be on the same PANEL/Meter and on the same pole(bus bar) of the panel. But certainly, they never needed to be on the same circuit breaker. Powerline adapters can even work through a sub-panel, as long as it connects to the original panel in the home. I have powerline adapters working through my house to a sub panel in my detached garage. Even the old actiontec AV500 I had works to my garage.

So generally speaking, with a typical 2 phase 120/240v household, you have a 1 in 2 chance that the power line adapter with work between circuit breakers. If the circuit breakers are on the same bus bar, it will work. Now if you have a specific location to place your powerline adapter, you can simply move the circuit breaker to the same bus bar as the other outlet so they're on the same bus bar. It's not that hard.


You can see in the picture below, as long as both outlets are on the same black or blue bus bar, then they're on the same node and will work. They'll even work through a sub panel as shown, as long as both outlets and breakers are on the same bus bar.

 
Last edited:
Reactions: haydenr34
Nov 17, 2020
115
18
95
3
There's A LOT of MISINFORMATION on this thread.

Powerline adapters do not need to be on the same circuit breaker, they need to be on the same PANEL/Meter and on the same pole(bus bar) of the panel. But certainly, they never needed to be on the same circuit breaker. Powerline adapters can even work through a sub-panel, as long as it connects to the original panel in the home. I have powerline adapters working through my house to a sub panel in my detached garage. Even the old actiontec AV500 I had works to my garage.

So generally speaking, with a typical 2 phase 120/240v household, you have a 1 in 2 chance that the power line adapter with work between circuit breakers. If the circuit breakers are on the same bus bar, it will work. Now if you have a specific location to place your powerline adapter, you can simply move the circuit breaker to the same bus bar as the other outlet so they're on the same bus bar. It's not that hard.


You can see in the picture below, as long as both outlets are on the same black or blue bus bar, then they're on the same node and will work. They'll even work through a sub panel as shown, as long as both outlets and breakers are on the same bus bar.

You obviously know your stuff. Comment re: same circuit is based on manufacturer instructions for every power line adapter I've owned.
 

DSzymborski

Titan
Moderator
Same circuit being a requirement wouldn't make logical sense anyway. After all, if it was required, then in most situations, you couldn't use them to cover much of the house; even not counting things like the furnace and a/c and kitchen appliance/dishwasher breakers, I have like a dozen circuits covering different areas of the house, and I have a fairly normal-sized house.
 

gggplaya

Distinguished
You obviously know your stuff. Comment re: same circuit is based on manufacturer instructions for every power line adapter I've owned.
Technically the whole panel is a circuit and something on a different panel with it's own meter is a different circuit. But, to most layman, contractors, and even electricians a circuit is associated with all the wiring after a circuit breaker as being it's own circuit. That's typically how people talk when referring to a circuit in a household. Maybe in other languages and countries, that's different, but in the U.S. at least, that's where all this confusion takes place.
 

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