Question Are heavy air coolers really bad for motherboards ?

Feb 7, 2021
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I have an ASUS Prime B365M-A with a Thermalright Frost Commander 140 hanging on it. I've seen a lot of comments about heavy coolers sagging and destroying boards, but have not seen any evidence yet. I've read enough that when looking at my PC it looks like the cooler is sagging already. It's an optical illusion, torpedo level confirms top of heatsink is plumb and heatsink sides are level. The case sides and top are plumb and level. I'm wondering about long term effects and can see how it could happen but also reasons why it shouldn't. Is there anything to worry about with a 1340g cooler ?
 

punkncat

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I have had failures of motherboard due to heavy air coolers, and in particular when the mobo is mounted vertically. This was far more common in the past, and also accelerated in the case of low layer count PCB. The support bracket aspect has gotten far better and have not had the issue in some time.
 

Phaaze88

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The mounting kits on newer models have gotten around this. The weight is spread out over the motherboard, which is spread out with the chassis, due to the standoffs.

You know what's worse in comparison? The gpu - especially the triple slot cards.
 
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Feb 7, 2021
63
3
45
0
I have had failures of motherboard due to heavy air coolers, and in particular when the mobo is mounted vertically. This was far more common in the past, and also accelerated in the case of low layer count PCB. The support bracket aspect has gotten far better and have not had the issue in some time.
Thanks, the low layer count was another reason for my concern. Not looking at specs right now but it's a thin board. Thinking about a different case with horz. mobo tray. Thermaltake Level 20 VT seems ok.
 

punkncat

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The mounting kits on newer models have gotten around this. The weight is spread out over the motherboard, which is spread out with the chassis, due to the standoffs.

You know what's worse in comparison? The gpu - especially the triple slot cards.
Agree 110%. In the case that one decides to use such a card it's a good idea to have a motherboard with the "armored" (steel) PCIe slot and/or the consideration of a GPU support.
 
Feb 7, 2021
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I thought the reinforced slot was marketing fluff all this time. I do agree with using a supporter with the chunky models.
I don't think it was fluff but that they marketed it incorrectly. Sheer force isn't the problem, it's tensile force to the top of the slot from the rotation of the card as the corner begins to sag. GPU support eliminates the need for reinforced slot. Even the heaviest cards should be without strain to the slot if supported at both ends, the middle then doesn't weigh anything.
 
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