[SOLVED] Are more budget PSU cable extensions potentially dangerous

MINIRED

Honorable
Jul 23, 2016
72
1
10,535
0
Don't get extensions when you can actually REPLACE your cables.

You know Ohm's law, right? You're doubling the length of the cable. That increases the resistance and causes voltages to drop.

More often than not when we have users here, other forums, Reddit, etc. with problems of rebooting, lock ups, etc., it's because they're using extensions.

Can they be "dangerous"? Well, depends on who you buy from and what you specify. If you get 16g wire, you know they have to be using HCS terminals since the regular mini-fit Jr. terminals only support up to 18g. But then you don't know if the connectors used are UL 94 rated for flammability. If you look at a lot of mining PC's, you'll find it's not the wire that burns, but the connectors. The connectors actually get hotter than the terminals because the terminals are metal and can dissipate heat, but they dissipate that heat into the connectors which then store that heat because plastic is an insulator.

example:
 

--SID--

Commendable
Jan 23, 2021
1,320
280
1,340
58
Using extensions is not recommanded. Extension makes the cables longer. Longer cables = higher resistence = lower voltage. I've seen a lot of systems crash because of extensions. If you have a modulair PSU, and you have, then always use replacement cables.
 
Don't get extensions when you can actually REPLACE your cables.

You know Ohm's law, right? You're doubling the length of the cable. That increases the resistance and causes voltages to drop.

More often than not when we have users here, other forums, Reddit, etc. with problems of rebooting, lock ups, etc., it's because they're using extensions.

Can they be "dangerous"? Well, depends on who you buy from and what you specify. If you get 16g wire, you know they have to be using HCS terminals since the regular mini-fit Jr. terminals only support up to 18g. But then you don't know if the connectors used are UL 94 rated for flammability. If you look at a lot of mining PC's, you'll find it's not the wire that burns, but the connectors. The connectors actually get hotter than the terminals because the terminals are metal and can dissipate heat, but they dissipate that heat into the connectors which then store that heat because plastic is an insulator.

example:
 

MINIRED

Honorable
Jul 23, 2016
72
1
10,535
0
Don't get extensions when you can actually REPLACE your cables.

You know Ohm's law, right? You're doubling the length of the cable. That increases the resistance and causes voltages to drop.

More often than not when we have users here, other forums, Reddit, etc. with problems of rebooting, lock ups, etc., it's because they're using extensions.

Can they be "dangerous"? Well, depends on who you buy from and what you specify. If you get 16g wire, you know they have to be using HCS terminals since the regular mini-fit Jr. terminals only support up to 18g. But then you don't know if the connectors used are UL 94 rated for flammability. If you look at a lot of mining PC's, you'll find it's not the wire that burns, but the connectors. The connectors actually get hotter than the terminals because the terminals are metal and can dissipate heat, but they dissipate that heat into the connectors which then store that heat because plastic is an insulator.

example:
No I wasn't aware of this, I know very little when it comes to what happens inside of components, I only know how to plug them all together for a PC lol, I only wanted extensions due to aesthetics as the bulkiness of my RMx aren't too pleasing on the eye, can I replace the cable with a sleeved type 4 cable from Corsair themselves? In the way of overclocking I don't really plan too, planning on something relatively low power like a 5800x or 5600x. I appreciate the detailed explanation.

Here is the type 4 cable I was looking at: https://www.google.com/shopping/product/1618300129224555783?q=motherboard+type+4+cable&prds=eto:4505388813049499691_0;8740053919406607338_0;7609316870831184164_0
 

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