[SOLVED] Are there any problems on my GPU or just a power problem?

Aug 25, 2019
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I was playing Street Fighter V in my PC then it went to a blue screen of death showing "Video TDR Failure of nvsm[something].dll]"

I rebooted my PC then after reaching the login page, it showed a white screen then rebooted (this happened several times). So I diagnosed by opening the case then I felt a shock when I touched my PC with my metal-handled screwdriver.

Upon removal of some cables I discovered that the VGA and the DVI cables were grounded and I could still be shocked if the cables are still hooked to my two monitors.

I unplugged the first monitor (the DVI one) on my AVR and plugged it to a regular socket, then the ground on the two cables lost. After the shock was lost the PC booted fine and I could play Street Fighter V again.
 

jonnyguru

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Ok. So here's where I'm going with this...

If your PSU is one of those 230V only units, replace it with one that supports full range input. Then, it won't even matter if mains voltage drops as low as 100V, eliminating the need for an AVR.

As for the monitors: I've never seen a monitor with a power brick that was "230V only". They're almost always full range (100V to 240V). Just look at the label of the monitors power supply (or on the back of the monitor if it has an internal power supply like Samsung does).

If all of your hardware supports full range mains voltage, you don't need an AVR. And since it sound like your AVR is broken (break in the ground), instead of spending money on another AVR, just buy a decent PSU instead.
 

Grobe

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If you can feel "shock" if you touch the pc cabinet, it does indicates a more wide spread earth grounding fault. It may be in your house or at your nighbours house.

In general, I advice you to contact an electrican to look at the problem as there is a risk of further damaging equipment.
 
Reactions: Phillip Corcoran
Aug 25, 2019
4
0
10
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If you can feel "shock" if you touch the pc cabinet, it does indicates a more wide spread earth grounding fault. It may be in your house or at your nighbours house.

In general, I advice you to contact an electrican to look at the problem as there is a risk of further damaging equipment.
I discovered that the shock originates from the VGA and DVI cables since when I unplugged those two from the PC, I don't feel the shock anymore.

Is that still the case?
 

jonnyguru

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We use 220V here in our country and everyone here uses those (as if it is another vital component).
Most of the world uses 220V, so I'm not sure what your point is there.

You didn't answer my question: "You said this only happened when the monitor was plugged into the AVR? " so now I'm going to bombard you with more questions.

What is your country?

Do you experience frequent brown outs where your mains voltage drop below 180V?

What is your PSU?

AVR's are usually used when you have shitty mains power AND a shitty PSU. Thing is, for what you pay for the AVR, you could just buy a beter PSU.

If your mains power is so bad that even a good PSU doesn't function properly (without an AVR), then you don't need an AVR. You need a UPS.

I find most countries that tend to use AVR (like India and Brazil, for example) are "sold" them by shady retailers that could sell ice to eskimos. It's typically a scam and most of the AVRs sold aren't actually true AVRs, but are fake.
 
Reactions: michael_0330
Aug 25, 2019
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0
10
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Most of the world uses 220V, so I'm not sure what your point is there.

You didn't answer my question: "You said this only happened when the monitor was plugged into the AVR? " so now I'm going to bombard you with more questions.

What is your country?

Do you experience frequent brown outs where your mains voltage drop below 180V?

What is your PSU?

AVR's are usually used when you have shitty mains power AND a shitty PSU. Thing is, for what you pay for the AVR, you could just buy a beter PSU.

If your mains power is so bad that even a good PSU doesn't function properly (without an AVR), then you don't need an AVR. You need a UPS.

I find most countries that tend to use AVR (like India and Brazil, for example) are "sold" them by shady retailers that could sell ice to eskimos. It's typically a scam and most of the AVRs sold aren't actually true AVRs, but are fake.
I thought that wasn't a question, sorry.

I live in the Philippines, yes, my PSU is a generic 750-watt INTEX PSU (comes shipped with the case).
 

jonnyguru

Distinguished
Ok. So here's where I'm going with this...

If your PSU is one of those 230V only units, replace it with one that supports full range input. Then, it won't even matter if mains voltage drops as low as 100V, eliminating the need for an AVR.

As for the monitors: I've never seen a monitor with a power brick that was "230V only". They're almost always full range (100V to 240V). Just look at the label of the monitors power supply (or on the back of the monitor if it has an internal power supply like Samsung does).

If all of your hardware supports full range mains voltage, you don't need an AVR. And since it sound like your AVR is broken (break in the ground), instead of spending money on another AVR, just buy a decent PSU instead.
 

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