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Question Are there any ways I can improve this build?

Tioym

Proper
Apr 5, 2020
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This is my first time making a gaming pc and I would appreciate advice and suggestions on how to improve this build. I am also on a $625 budget

https://pcpartpicker.com/list/NwmV8M
I would get a R3 3300X if you can find it below $130.
although yes we need to shift from HDD to SSD but I think you'll end up needing a HDD later on. Most games are very large, just look at GTA 5 sitting at 92 gigs. Newer AAA titles are all around 50 gigs or more. You'll end up having to choose which games you wanna keep in your storage. I recommend get a 256GB SSD and get a 1tb HD. A HDD that doesn't have your OS is a lot faster than you think because it's just sitting there waiting to be written to. Everything else looks fine. Even if you go with a cheap HDD option right now, you can slowly get more SSDs and then take out the HDD when you have enough SSD Space or just keep it for random stuff.
 

Karadjgne

Titan
Ambassador
Umph. Kinda right, sorta. Maybe not.

The 3300x, is very flexible for now, does great with many titles, almost as good as the 3600. So I'd agree with that.

You can always get a hdd later. $50 or less gets you a 1Tb that's decent and will have the room. The difference with the OS on a ssd is that everything is cached by the ssd. When you load a game for the first time, it first has to go through ssd cache. Where it stays. So once loaded, it'll run at ssd speeds, not hdd speeds. Steam, origin, all those get installed on ssd, their storage files on hdd. You access steam, it's all ssd.

SSD access read and write speeds are @ 5x faster than hdd.

Build looks solid for the budget, although I'm not a fan of the TT Smart series, they are wimpy and low quality, made more for an OEM grandma's websurfer replacement than a gaming pc. They don't take hard hitting gpu usage well. A decent quality 550w would be better, not because it's 550w, but because it's not a mid-low end psu that is usually in the 500w level. There really aren't any decent 500w I can think of off hand. But a lot of gaming quality 550w/650w.
 

logainofhades

Titan
Moderator
Something to consider. More overall storage, better quality PSU.

PCPartPicker Part List

CPU: AMD Ryzen 5 1600 (12nm) 3.2 GHz 6-Core Processor ($104.99 @ Amazon)
Motherboard: Gigabyte B450M DS3H Micro ATX AM4 Motherboard ($72.99 @ Best Buy)
Memory: G.Skill Aegis 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3000 CL16 Memory ($59.99 @ Amazon)
Storage: Silicon Power Ace A55 256 GB 2.5" Solid State Drive ($29.99 @ Amazon)
Storage: Seagate BarraCuda 1 TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($44.99 @ Newegg)
Video Card: XFX Radeon RX 580 8 GB GTS XXX ED Video Card ($169.99 @ Amazon)
Case: SHARKOON VG5 ATX Mid Tower Case ($44.72 @ Amazon)
Power Supply: Corsair CXM 650 W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-modular ATX Power Supply ($94.99 @ Best Buy)
Total: $622.65
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2020-06-16 00:05 EDT-0400
 
Jun 15, 2020
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Thanks for the advice, ill look for a 1tb hhd. What exactly do you mean by storage files? (sorry, im not familiar with this term)
 
Jun 16, 2020
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Thanks for the advice, ill look for a 1tb hhd. What exactly do you mean by storage files? (sorry, im not familiar with this term)
Stuff like your documents, music, photoshop files, installed programs etc.

It's common practice to install Windows on a solid state drive, and then move your my documents folder and steam library onto a hard drive
 

Karadjgne

Titan
Ambassador
Yep. When you install Steam, it's really a 2 part installation. It keeps its main operating files and saved game files seperate from its library files. I have a 128Gb ssd (7 years old now) so space management is critical. So Steam is on C drive, but all the actual game files that Steam uses are on F, a hdd. I hit play, Steam is already loaded on ssd, loads up the game files into Windows cache, pulls any saved data from C saved games, and plays at ssd speeds.

After the initial install, just open up settings and you can dictate where stuff is stored. Origin, u-play, anything that uses a library system can be done the same way. Just organize it into folders for simplicity and expediency since you'll have millions of seperate files, some of which may have the same name, like 'Start' or knock.mid etc.
 
Jun 15, 2020
22
0
10
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Yep. When you install Steam, it's really a 2 part installation. It keeps its main operating files and saved game files seperate from its library files. I have a 128Gb ssd (7 years old now) so space management is critical. So Steam is on C drive, but all the actual game files that Steam uses are on F, a hdd. I hit play, Steam is already loaded on ssd, loads up the game files into Windows cache, pulls any saved data from C saved games, and plays at ssd speeds.

After the initial install, just open up settings and you can dictate where stuff is stored. Origin, u-play, anything that uses a library system can be done the same way. Just organize it into folders for simplicity and expediency since you'll have millions of seperate files, some of which may have the same name, like 'Start' or knock.mid etc.
Ohh so I download steam onto my SSD and when i'm downloading games from steam I direct the downloads to my HHD, right?
 

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