Question Are These Temperatures Too Hot for MSI RTX 3090ti Suprim X?

Jabad96

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Hi, I recently bought an RTX 3090ti card and was wondering if the following gpu temps is something i should be concerned of. Ive been sitting on this thought for a little bit and wanted to get it off my chest. When gpu temps increase so does cpu temps. My cpu is an i7 8700k cooled with an 120mm corsair h55 AIO installed at the rear side of chassis as exhaust, so the hot air produced inside the chassis by the gpu fan goes through the radiator out the case. My case is a white Be Quiet! Pure Base 500 with tempered window and installed with max chassis fan which has two 140mm exhaust at top and 3 120mm fans at from as cool intake all of which are Be Quiet! brand fans.

The following from GPU-Z app while running microsoft flight simulator 2020 with cpu temps rising from mid to high 70s degrees based on the figures below:
GPU Clock: 1995.0Mhz
Memory clock: 1312.7MHz
GPU Temperature: 77.3 Degrees
Hot Spot: 88.1 Degrees
Memory Temperature: 72 Degrees
Fan 1 Speed (%): 75%
Fan 1 Speed (RPM): 2432 RPM
Fan 2 Speed (%): 75%
Fan 2 Speed (RPM): 2436 RPM
Memory used: 8730MB
GPU load: 94%
Memory controller load: 24 %
Video Engine Load: 0 %
Bus interface Load: 5 %
Board Power draw: 445.9W
GPU Chip Power Draw: 357.9W
 

Darkbreeze

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That's a pretty underwhelming cooler for an 8700k. Right off the bat I'd suggest considering something better for cooling the CPU. What kind of CPU temps are you seeing under a full load?

As far as your GPU temps are concerned, what is the exact model of your card. I've seen specs for various 3090 ti cards vary, anywhere from 71°C to 79°C, and reviews seem to bear this out.
 
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Jabad96

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That's a pretty underwhelming cooler for an 8700k. Right off the bat I'd suggest considering something better for cooling the CPU. What kind of CPU temps are you seeing under a full load?

As far as your GPU temps are concerned, what is the exact model of your card.
Any recommendation for the cpu cooler? I can fit up to 240mm radiator top chassis or up to 360mm radiator front chassis, and up to 140mm rear.
The cpu temps differ based on the game application i run for instance ive seen all time high 70s degrees like 78 or 79 on one core based off of the above gpu-z temp reading on full load on Microsoft Flight Simulator 2020 and fortnite. Other times they are lower at approximtely high 60s to low 70s 68-72 degrees while running other games such as saint row 2022, and halo infinite.
For the gpu it is:
MSI Gaming GeForce RTX 3090ti Suprim X 24GB GDDR6X 384-Bit HDMI/DP Nvlink Tri-Frozr Ampere Architecture OC Graphics Card
 

Darkbreeze

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If you are seeing 79°C core temps from just gaming, then you are in serious need of a different cooler. Those are the kinds of temps you should, at most, be seeing when running a full stress test on the CPU to validate thermal compliance.

Do you have Dragon center installed?
 
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Phaaze88

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@Darkbreeze , OP is seeing 79C core temperatures because of the combination of 3090Ti(stupid power draw that gets dumped inside PC) plus H55 as rear exhaust.
I never understood why people mounted those little coolers at the back like that.

@Jabad96 , look at how your system is set up. The H55 has no access to cool air, so you're currently brute forcing cooling through the fluid loop alone.
 

Karadjgne

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H55 = Hyper212. Make your own conclusions there. Regardless of gpu added heat, it's 140w cooler on a cpu capable of closer to 250w with a 5GHz OC or at stock it pulls @ 90w. So the H55 is suitable for stock application, given a normally sized gpu, but with the 3090ti exhaust, it's not going to be the greatest temps.

A better cooler isn't going to change that much. What's needed is better airflow properties. Put the rad on the front intake. Let the case fans exhaust the gpu heat unrestricted. That puts the cpu out of the gpu loop, gives the cpu unrestricted outside ambient air temps, and promotes faster and easier unrestricted gpu exhaust. Mount the H55 in a pull config so the gpu gets plenty of air
 
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Jabad96

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If you are seeing 79°C core temps from just gaming, then you are in serious need of a different cooler. Those are the kinds of temps you should, at most, be seeing when running a full stress test on the CPU to validate thermal compliance.

Do you have Dragon center installed?
I don’t have the dragon centre installed, I’ll look into it.
 

Karadjgne

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Do not install Dragon Center. Darkbreeze was asking because that software has a nasty habit. It changes bios default settings after windows loads. Where you'd expect to see standard voltages and therefore temps, DC artificially bumps the voltages and amperages in attempt to give the cpu more power and speed. That works ok on the small cpus like the pentium series etc but can be a disaster for the larger cpus that are already higher in performance.

It'd take the 90w stock cpu and bump it up closer to 150w, reducing its chances of being cool on a mediocre cooler.

For most ppl it's more an aggravation than a helpful software.
 

Jabad96

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Ok I’ll install the cpu cooler in front chassis and check temps. Talking about cooler, I found an alternative 3090ti which is water cooled with 240mm radius and it’s going for a bit cheaper than what I currently have. This one is called Asus Rog strix lc oc edition and from the review I’ve seen it seems like it has better gpu temperature under load. The factory oc is similar with it being 30mhz more than the msi. What do you guys think worth the swap?
 

Jabad96

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Do not install Dragon Center. Darkbreeze was asking because that software has a nasty habit. It changes bios default settings after windows loads. Where you'd expect to see standard voltages and therefore temps, DC artificially bumps the voltages and amperages in attempt to give the cpu more power and speed. That works ok on the small cpus like the pentium series etc but can be a disaster for the larger cpus that are already higher in performance.

It'd take the 90w stock cpu and bump it up closer to 150w, reducing its chances of being cool on a mediocre cooler.

For most ppl it's more an aggravation than a helpful software.
Ok I’ll stay away from that software.
 

Phaaze88

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Ok I’ll install the cpu cooler in front chassis and check temps. Talking about cooler, I found an alternative 3090ti which is water cooled with 240mm radius and it’s going for a bit cheaper than what I currently have. This one is called Asus Rog strix lc oc edition and from the review I’ve seen it seems like it has better gpu temperature under load. The factory oc is similar with it being 30mhz more than the msi. What do you guys think worth the swap?
If you install that model's radiator up top,
remove the rear fan and install just an air filter - that way the gpu has access to room air from both the front and rear of the case,
it's more efficient, as the biggest criminal dumps its heat directly into the room, instead of inside the PC and inevitably into the room.

Performance would be unnoticeable.
Worth it is up to you. What you're getting with the current gpu model is already really good - it's just that you were choking the cpu cooler of fresh air.
 
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Karadjgne

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The chimney is very self sustaining, been around for thousands of years because man really hasn't found very many ways to improve on it.

It starts with a fire putting out heat. That heat rises, creating a low pressure area behind it. Nature abhors a vacuum, so ambient air will move to replace and equalize that low pressure area, bringing fresh air for the fire to feed on, which creates heat... Rinse and repeat in an endless cycle.

No difference to your gpu. It'll push hot exhaust up, top fans help it to move, pulling air in from wherever below. That's airflow.

Some of the highest rated airflow cases around are the Raven series made by Silverstone. They are a perfect example of the Chimney, not even bothering with exhaust fans, just intakes on the bottom. It's a very effective and efficient way to do things.
 
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Darkbreeze

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I'd just put something like this in front, move one of the front fans to the rear exhaust location after removing the cooler that is there now, and call it a day. It's more than adequate for your CPU, much better by far than what you have now, performs well and is very quiet and is relatively inexpensive.

PCPartPicker Part List

CPU Cooler: be quiet! Pure Loop 280 Liquid CPU Cooler ($104.90 @ Amazon)
Total: $104.90
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2022-09-11 23:12 EDT-0400



You could get something "ok" for less and in white going with something like the ID-Cooling Frostflow X 240 snow or Auraflow 240 snow, but it doesn't perform as well as most other 240mm AIO coolers and is a bit louder.

You could also do something like this and save a few bucks while also maybe increasing performance a bit, but they will definitely be louder than an equivalent Be Quiet, Corsair, Fractal design or similar higher end unit.

PCPartPicker Part List

CPU Cooler: ID-COOLING FROSTFLOW X 74.5 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler ($54.99 @ Amazon)
Case Fan: ARCTIC P14 PST 72.8 CFM 140 mm Fan ($12.99 @ Amazon)
Case Fan: ARCTIC P14 PST 72.8 CFM 140 mm Fan ($12.99 @ Amazon)
Total: $80.97
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2022-09-11 23:18 EDT-0400
 

Jabad96

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If you install that model's radiator up top,
remove the rear fan and install just an air filter - that way the gpu has access to room air from both the front and rear of the case,
it's more efficient, as the biggest criminal dumps its heat directly into the room, instead of inside the PC and inevitably into the room.

Performance would be unnoticeable.
Worth it is up to you. What you're getting with the current gpu model is already really good - it's just that you were choking the cpu cooler of fresh air.
Nvm the asus aio gpu sold out 😔. But wouldn’t it be better if I had a simple exhaust fan installed at the rear than just a filter because excess hot air needs to be removed asap by the suction force? And room air enters into case via front fans. but I was thinking if I got like maxed out 360mm cpu radiator and put it up front will this be choking too much cool air trying to enter the case from the front or it’s best to have a balance at front with a smaller cpu radiator and just simple intake fans?
 

Jabad96

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I'd just put something like this in front, move one of the front fans to the rear exhaust location after removing the cooler that is there now, and call it a day. It's more than adequate for your CPU, much better by far than what you have now, performs well and is very quiet and is relatively inexpensive.

PCPartPicker Part List

CPU Cooler: be quiet! Pure Loop 280 Liquid CPU Cooler ($104.90 @ Amazon)
Total: $104.90
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2022-09-11 23:12 EDT-0400



You could get something "ok" for less and in white going with something like the ID-Cooling Frostflow X 240 snow or Auraflow 240 snow, but it doesn't perform as well as most other 240mm AIO coolers and is a bit louder.

You could also do something like this and save a few bucks while also maybe increasing performance a bit, but they will definitely be louder than an equivalent Be Quiet, Corsair, Fractal design or similar higher end unit.

PCPartPicker Part List

CPU Cooler: ID-COOLING FROSTFLOW X 74.5 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler ($54.99 @ Amazon)
Case Fan: ARCTIC P14 PST 72.8 CFM 140 mm Fan ($12.99 @ Amazon)
Case Fan: ARCTIC P14 PST 72.8 CFM 140 mm Fan ($12.99 @ Amazon)
Total: $80.97
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2022-09-11 23:18 EDT-0400
Ok I’m going to check the temps from swapping the position of one of the front chassis fans with the cpu radiator before deciding to need any new cooler.
 

Phaaze88

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But wouldn’t it be better if I had a simple exhaust fan installed at the rear than just a filter because excess hot air needs to be removed asap by the suction force? And room air enters into case via front fans.
If you are going to install an AIO/CLC up top, NO. Also, there's no rule that room air must enter through the front.
Thanks to hive/herd mentality, or boy who cried wolf, users of top mounted liquid coolers have been providing less cool room air than they could've been to them. Nonetheless, it is not as extreme as your initial scenario of rear 120mm plus two top exhausts.
The cpu-gpu temperature tradeoff between front Vs top mounted cpu AIO/CLC in gaming PCs has always fared worse for cpu core temperatures because so many have a rear exhaust installed, instead of providing room air across both halves of the cooler.
"Well, just put the biggest AIO/CLC possible up top!" Well, that can work to an extent, but there's still no real excuse for the rear exhaust. Air coolers - sure, stick to the top + rear exhaust setup.

I was thinking if I got like maxed out 360mm cpu radiator and put it up front will this be choking too much cool air trying to enter the case from the front
For a moment, forget the general recommendation of front intake, rear+top exhaust, and liquid > air.

AIO/CLCs are really long air coolers. They are more dependent on airflow than they appear; all the liquid does is go in a circle, and that alone leads to a loop that continues to heat up.
Now, what's that big ol' 360mm supposed to do for that cpu in a gaming focused PC? That cpu won't use nearly as much power in games compared to running Cinebench R23/OCCT/Prime95.
Let's say it uses around 100w on average in game. That's a cakewalk for a bunch of smaller coolers, but that power use pales in comparison to the current gpu which can easily use four times that amount, and pumps it all inside the PC before exhausting into the room.
It shouldn't require much consideration: what the cpu can dump inside the PC is a joke compared to what that gpu can do.

If anything is choking air, it would be the combo of installing large AIO/CLCs at the front + the Pure Base 500's front panel. You would have to run the liquid cooler's fans at higher rpm to overcome all that wall, and so much for keeping it quiet at that point...


I got a bad habit of long posts...
TL;DR: It's all in how you use the hardware. Your 3090Ti's thermals are great, but the H55 was installed in what I would consider the worst possible spot for it; like I posted earlier, you've got no room air feeding through it.
 
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Karadjgne

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But wouldn’t it be better if I had a simple exhaust fan installed at the rear than just a filter because excess hot air needs to be removed asap by the suction force? And room air enters into case via front fans.
Hot air rises. You also have forced hot air exhaust from the gpu going straight up. A rear exhaust fan is going to try and pull that rising hot air 90° sideways.

but I was thinking if I got like maxed out 360mm cpu radiator and put it up front will this be choking too much cool air trying to enter the case from the front or it’s best to have a balance at front with a smaller cpu radiator and just simple intake fans?
CFM is CFM. The rad doesn't stop or even choke that cfm to any large degree at all, the air still moves into the case. What happens though is there's enough restriction that in 'push' configuration with the fans exterior to the rad, the static pressure is choked almost completely, unless there's a ton of it. That pressure is the force behind the volume of air, so the air doesn't go anywhere except towards the source of liw pressure, the exhaust fan. That bypasses most of what goes to feed the gpu.

The aio in 'pull' config, with the fans interior doesn't have that restriction.
 
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Jabad96

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My cpu temperatures have dropped after putting the radiator at the front. Now it sits around 50s to low 60s when running the games. Then I decided to turn on intel turbo boost which is 4.7ghz and cpu temp topped at 81c for on core for flight simulator 2020, and saints row 2022. I did this to try to get the most out of my cpu with out manual overclocking which i dont have experience with. I realized im in need of a new cpu cooler since i had the corsair h55 120mm for about 9 years. I am deciding to post pone purchasing a new one since ive decided to get a new cpu raptor lake when it comes out including motherboard and ddr5 ram because my current setup with corsair 16gb 3200mhz red led and i7 8700k is quite a bottleneck for this gpu. So im currently ok with higher cpu temps with turbo boost under gaming load. Ill probably end up getting a corsair aio. Ive tried installing deepcool ls 720 360mm but the heatsink wouldnt completely sit on my cpu regardless of how hard i screwed it and dont like the idea of applying that much pressure on mobo so i returned it after following all their installation instructions for lga 1151. Ive also decided to swap the msi suprim x with asus rog strix lc oc edition gpu and now have additional space in chassis slightly high clock speed out of box with gaming and cooler temps. I mounted the radiator for the gpu up top 240mm since i have the cpu aio 120mm mounted at front. I am getting around mid 50s to low 60s under gpu load but what i dont understand is which would cause thermal throttling, since there is the gpu, hotspot, and memory temps. The memory temp and hot spot temp are usually identical, is this how it is suppose to be?
 

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