Question Are these temps good or bad?

Jan 25, 2020
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temps jump around a lot like 30-50 in seconds all the time seems like it cant just idol close to a temp for a while is that normal?
 

Zizo007

Respectable
Feb 23, 2019
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These are excellent temps, what are you worried about?

Jumps in temperature are normal nowdays since new CPUs downclock when idle and oc or turbo under heavy load. CPU clock is scaled to how heavy the load is.
 
Jan 25, 2020
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maybe but
I just replaced the thermal compound with the thermal grizzly kryonaught dropped the stress test in aids almost 15c was hitting clost to 85 also I hjave push pull on the rad
 
Jan 25, 2020
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also its a i9-9900ks the special edition one running 8 cores all 5ghz auto from the mobo for some reason never looked into it though
 

Zizo007

Respectable
Feb 23, 2019
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Prime95 is not a realistic test, it will make your cpu work at more than its designed TDP wattage. So other tasks like encoding and gaming will result in much lower temps than Prime95.
 

CompuTronix

Intel Master
Moderator
Bi0Ph34rX,

On behalf of Tom's moderator Team, welcome aboard!

(1) You haven't mentioned your ambient temperature. The International Standard for "normal" room temperature is 22°C or 72°F. Ambient can be a HUGE variable.

(2) AIDA64 has 4 CPU related stress test selections which have 15 possible combinations that yield 15 different Core temperatures. The individual CPU test is only a 70% workload, which gives users misleadingly low thermal results. Any meaningful comparisons need to account for as many variables as possible.

(3) Prime95 Small FFT's without AVX/2 is a true 100% workload.

(4) Prime95 Small FFT's with AVX/2 is a 130% workload.

“Stress” tests vary widely and can be characterized into two categories; stability tests which are fluctuating workloads, and thermal tests which are steady workloads. Prime95 v29.8 Small FFT's (all AVX test selections disabled) is ideally suited for testing thermal performance, because it conforms to Intel's Datasheets as a steady 100% workload with steady Core temperatures. No other utility can so closely replicate Intel's thermal test workload.

Utilities that don't overload or underload your processor will give you a valid thermal baseline. Here’s a comparison of utilities grouped as thermal and stability tests according to % of TDP, averaged across six processor Generations at stock settings rounded to the nearest 5%:


Although these tests range from 70% to 130% TDP workload, Windows Task Manager interprets every test as 100% CPU Utilization, which is processor resource activity, not actual workload.

If you want to get yourself up to speed on this topic, then you need to read this Sticky: Intel Temperature Guide

It's right at the top of the CPUs Forum; if you just look you can't miss it.

See Sections 11 - Thermal Test Basics & Section 12 - Thermal Test 100% Workload.

Once again, welcome aboard!

:sol:
 
Reactions: sgnz
Jan 25, 2020
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ambient temp fluctuates its winter and I have the window wide open but 10 gpus mining away.

I will run small fft avx for a while and post what the outcome is.
 

CompuTronix

Intel Master
Moderator
You need to run Prime95 v29.8 Small FFT's with all AVX test selections disabled.


Click on the AVX test selections that are not greyed out so that all three AVX boxes are checked, as shown above.

As per Intel’s Datasheets, TDP and Thermal Specifications are validated “without AVX. You can also use v26.6 Small FFT's which doesn't have AVX. Core temperatures will be the same as 29.8 without AVX.

CT :sol:
 
Jan 25, 2020
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started the test so far max temp seems to be about 80c for a i9-9900ks oc to 5ghz all cors is that about right i'll post temps later on as the test runs longer though.
 

CompuTronix

Intel Master
Moderator
Looks good now, but keep in mind that your Core temperatures will be higher in the summer when ambient temperature is higher.

Here's the nominal operating range for Core temperature:

Core temperatures above 85°C are not recommended.

Core temperatures below 80°C are ideal.


Also, if you use your rig for heavy CPU workloads such as rendering or transcoding, some software use AVX/2 Instruction Sets which can push your processor as hard as P95 without AVX/2. In this instance, configure an AVX Offset in BIOS to limit Core speed and Core temperatures. However, if all you do is gaming which is typically a moderate CPU workload, then you shouldn't encounter any thermal issues.

CT :sol:
 
Jan 25, 2020
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hey thanks, yea gaming and videos for me but I like to go ultra settings and only have a 1440p monitor(2k) anyways but also cpu might be higher because I don't have my gpu installed yet so i'm plugged into the motherboard and I am assuming using the intel graphics on cpu.
 

CompuTronix

Intel Master
Moderator
thekillerx10,

Respectfully, you might want to actually check the specifications so you don't post inaccurate information, which is misleading to other Forum Members as well as Tom's visiting readers. Here's a link to Intel's Product Specifications website. Also, it's always advisable to read threads in their entirety prior to posting, as users sometimes provide links to factual information.

For the record, Throttle temperature for the i9-9900KS is 100°C or 212°F (boiling point of water). Throttle temperature is also found on page 100, Table 5-5 of Intel's 8th and 9th Generation Datasheet. Regardless, it’s not advisable to run a CPU near its thermal limit, just as common sense tells you not to drive a vehicle with the temperature gauge in the red zone.


If your hottest Core is near its specified Tj Max Throttle temperature, then your CPU is already too hot. The consensus among well informed and highly experienced reviewers, system builders and expert overclockers, is that it's prudent to observe a reasonable thermal margin below Throttle temperature for ultimate stability, performance and longevity.

This is why Core temperatures above 85°C are not recommended, as shown on the scale in my previous post.

CT :sol:
 

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