Asia ; Myanmar wants workers in Thailand to return home:

G

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Archived from groups: alt.games.half-life,alt.sufi,alt.surrealism,soc.culture.burma (More info?)

Asia ; Myanmar wants workers in Thailand to return home:
13 Hours,31 minutes Ago


[Asia News] BANGKOK : Myanmar's military rulers have asked Thailand to
force the estimated one million Myanmar workers to return home to be issued
with passports and other documents, a senior Thai minister said Tuesday.



Myanmar sent a letter to the Thai foreign ministry last week asking
for the return of all immigrant workers so that authorities in Yangon could
verify their identity and issue passports and permits to work outside the
country, Deputy Prime Minister Surakiart Sathirathai said.



"It would be difficult to send a million people to the border,"
Surakiart told reporters.



"Thailand wants Myanmar to send officials to Bangkok to identify the
workers and issue all documents," he said.

Nay ne la

shwe ne mya

rebuilding atlantis in the bay of bengal
 
G

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Archived from groups: alt.games.half-life (More info?)

I had a quick question. I'm on my second playthrough of HL2, and I was
just remembering that there was supposed to be a cargo ship level, but I
never found this. Was it removed from the final game?















Yes, I know. I recommend that everyone hijack as many of JerkJoff's
threads as possible to discuss HL2/Farcry/FPS/video games.
 
G

Guest

Guest
Archived from groups: alt.games.half-life,alt.sufi,alt.surrealism,soc.culture.burma (More info?)

Thailand has accepted these Burmese as refugees, illegal immigrants,
asylum seekers in its own free will. Thai business companies have given
them works.
These people frequently create problems between Burma and Thailand and
between Burma and international communities.

These problems have nothing to do with Burma's politic or Burma's
economy. They are there for their own convinience, they went to other
side telling all the tall stories about Burma, using Burma difficulties
as their cover for being in Tahiland. They have been there for years,
Thailand did nothing about it. Infact Thailand accepted them as cheap
labours. Thailand benefits from them. These people are nothing but
trouble makers for both Thailand and Burma.

SPDC from one side is so very linient by saying it will accept them if
they can prove themselves they are Burmese, the same as Rohingyas.
These people went out with no documents on their own. They are law
breakers. There are laws governing illegal immigrant.

Thailand must know that if it doesn't deal with these illegal
immigrants, there will be social tentions with will amount to one day
they will ask for their automous region, their own independent land in
Thailand challenging Thailand.

There are many ethnic people who are living on bothside on Burma and
Thailand. Nobody knows which country they belong to.

My suggestion is , both Thailand and Burma should deal with them
according to the laws of the land.

On the other hand they should be handed over to UN and send them to
countries which are preaching human rights which are the Champions in
human rights. Let them take care of them.

Sando.



jirjis wrote:
> Asia ; Myanmar wants workers in Thailand to return home:
> 13 Hours,31 minutes Ago
>
>
> [Asia News] BANGKOK : Myanmar's military rulers have asked
Thailand to
> force the estimated one million Myanmar workers to return home to be
issued
> with passports and other documents, a senior Thai minister said
Tuesday.
>
>
>
> Myanmar sent a letter to the Thai foreign ministry last week
asking
> for the return of all immigrant workers so that authorities in Yangon
could
> verify their identity and issue passports and permits to work outside
the
> country, Deputy Prime Minister Surakiart Sathirathai said.
>
>
>
> "It would be difficult to send a million people to the border,"

> Surakiart told reporters.
>
>
>
> "Thailand wants Myanmar to send officials to Bangkok to
identify the
> workers and issue all documents," he said.
>
> Nay ne la
>
> shwe ne mya
>
> rebuilding atlantis in the bay of bengal
 
G

Guest

Guest
Archived from groups: alt.games.half-life,alt.sufi,alt.surrealism,soc.culture.burma (More info?)

Jirjis,

I would request that you kindly stop cross-posting to alt.sufi.

Please feel free to post directly to alt.sufi if you feel that what you
post is of relevance to what we are discussing.

Best wishes,

J.

jirjis wrote:
> no if
>
> un but
>
> 5 star cities
>
> international migration zone
>
> For the International Monetary Fund's chief economist, two big global
trends
> jump off the page - the growing role of developing countries in the
world
> economy and the ageing population of the developed world.
> And Raghu Rajan said in a BBC interview that the two trends could,
and
> should be linked.
>
> How? In short, because rich countries should be saving for their old
age.
> They should invest more in the developing world where there are
plenty of
> workers and a need for capital.
>
> The income from that investment could then pay for the pensions and
> healthcare needed by ageing populations in rich nations.
>
> Two-way street
>
> Mr Rajan said capital should be transferred "to younger populations
which
> will be able to use it more productively and pay a return which would
be a
> good thing for the developed economies in their old age".
>
> Another way the same benefits could be achieved is migration -
workers from
> the developing world moving to rich countries.
>
> He said: "Some mix of immigration and capital outflows will
eventually be a
> way of solving, quote unquote, the ageing problem."
>
> Mr Rajan said that developing countries already account for a growing
share
> of global activity, just because they are growing faster than the
rich
> countries. But he added: "They are typically more volatile, there are
more
> ups and downs."
>
> Problem or powerhouse?
>
> He said: "One of the biggest concerns in the world economy nowadays
is
> Chinese growth."
>
> The impact of China will vary from country to country, but it "is
something
> one wouldn't have thought of, any developing country being so central
to the
> world economy in the past", he said
>
> The volatility is one reason that savings don't go to the developing
world
> in the quantities that Mr Rajan thinks they should.
>
> He said developing country governments have not reformed their
financial
> systems enough to make them attractive and safe for investors from
rich
> countries.
>
> US imbalance
>
> But it's not just their fault. The rich countries, especially the
United
> States, should be saving more.
>
> The US is importing capital especially from Asia, when it should, he
said,
> be sending more abroad.
>
> American households need to save more. The government needs to reduce
the
> deficit in its own finances and borrow less from abroad - so more
would be
> available for investment in the developing world.
>
> The IMF's new report on the World Economic Outlook does identify a
source of
> savings that is providing more funds for investment in the developing

> world - money sent back home by migrant workers.
>
> It amounts to about $100bn (£52bn; 77bn euros) a year, and for some
> developing countries half of total capital inflows.
>
> Some of it is used for day-to-day spending, but a lot goes into
investment
> in small businesses.
>
> rebuilding atlantis in the Bay of Bengal.
>
>
>
> <shweminthame@aol.com> wrote in message
> news:1113465128.328429.304360@f14g2000cwb.googlegroups.com...
> > Thailand has accepted these Burmese as refugees, illegal
immigrants,
> > asylum seekers in its own free will. Thai business companies have
given
> > them works.
> > These people frequently create problems between Burma and Thailand
and
> > between Burma and international communities.
> >
> > These problems have nothing to do with Burma's politic or Burma's
> > economy. They are there for their own convinience, they went to
other
> > side telling all the tall stories about Burma, using Burma
difficulties
> > as their cover for being in Tahiland. They have been there for
years,
> > Thailand did nothing about it. Infact Thailand accepted them as
cheap
> > labours. Thailand benefits from them. These people are nothing but
> > trouble makers for both Thailand and Burma.
> >
> > SPDC from one side is so very linient by saying it will accept them
if
> > they can prove themselves they are Burmese, the same as Rohingyas.
> > These people went out with no documents on their own. They are law
> > breakers. There are laws governing illegal immigrant.
> >
> > Thailand must know that if it doesn't deal with these illegal
> > immigrants, there will be social tentions with will amount to one
day
> > they will ask for their automous region, their own independent land
in
> > Thailand challenging Thailand.
> >
> > There are many ethnic people who are living on bothside on Burma
and
> > Thailand. Nobody knows which country they belong to.
> >
> > My suggestion is , both Thailand and Burma should deal with them
> > according to the laws of the land.
> >
> > On the other hand they should be handed over to UN and send them to
> > countries which are preaching human rights which are the Champions
in
> > human rights. Let them take care of them.
> >
> > Sando.
> >
> >
> >
> > jirjis wrote:
> >> Asia ; Myanmar wants workers in Thailand to return home:
> >> 13 Hours,31 minutes Ago
> >>
> >>
> >> [Asia News] BANGKOK : Myanmar's military rulers have asked
> > Thailand to
> >> force the estimated one million Myanmar workers to return home to
be
> > issued
> >> with passports and other documents, a senior Thai minister said
> > Tuesday.
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >> Myanmar sent a letter to the Thai foreign ministry last week
> > asking
> >> for the return of all immigrant workers so that authorities in
Yangon
> > could
> >> verify their identity and issue passports and permits to work
outside
> > the
> >> country, Deputy Prime Minister Surakiart Sathirathai said.
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >> "It would be difficult to send a million people to the
border,"
> >
> >> Surakiart told reporters.
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >> "Thailand wants Myanmar to send officials to Bangkok to
> > identify the
> >> workers and issue all documents," he said.
> >>
> >> Nay ne la
> >>
> >> shwe ne mya
> >>
> >> rebuilding atlantis in the bay of bengal
> >
 
G

Guest

Guest
Archived from groups: alt.games.half-life,alt.sufi,alt.surrealism,soc.culture.burma (More info?)

no if

un but

5 star cities

international migration zone

For the International Monetary Fund's chief economist, two big global trends
jump off the page - the growing role of developing countries in the world
economy and the ageing population of the developed world.
And Raghu Rajan said in a BBC interview that the two trends could, and
should be linked.

How? In short, because rich countries should be saving for their old age.
They should invest more in the developing world where there are plenty of
workers and a need for capital.

The income from that investment could then pay for the pensions and
healthcare needed by ageing populations in rich nations.

Two-way street

Mr Rajan said capital should be transferred "to younger populations which
will be able to use it more productively and pay a return which would be a
good thing for the developed economies in their old age".

Another way the same benefits could be achieved is migration - workers from
the developing world moving to rich countries.

He said: "Some mix of immigration and capital outflows will eventually be a
way of solving, quote unquote, the ageing problem."

Mr Rajan said that developing countries already account for a growing share
of global activity, just because they are growing faster than the rich
countries. But he added: "They are typically more volatile, there are more
ups and downs."

Problem or powerhouse?

He said: "One of the biggest concerns in the world economy nowadays is
Chinese growth."

The impact of China will vary from country to country, but it "is something
one wouldn't have thought of, any developing country being so central to the
world economy in the past", he said

The volatility is one reason that savings don't go to the developing world
in the quantities that Mr Rajan thinks they should.

He said developing country governments have not reformed their financial
systems enough to make them attractive and safe for investors from rich
countries.

US imbalance

But it's not just their fault. The rich countries, especially the United
States, should be saving more.

The US is importing capital especially from Asia, when it should, he said,
be sending more abroad.

American households need to save more. The government needs to reduce the
deficit in its own finances and borrow less from abroad - so more would be
available for investment in the developing world.

The IMF's new report on the World Economic Outlook does identify a source of
savings that is providing more funds for investment in the developing
world - money sent back home by migrant workers.

It amounts to about $100bn (£52bn; 77bn euros) a year, and for some
developing countries half of total capital inflows.

Some of it is used for day-to-day spending, but a lot goes into investment
in small businesses.

rebuilding atlantis in the Bay of Bengal.



<shweminthame@aol.com> wrote in message
news:1113465128.328429.304360@f14g2000cwb.googlegroups.com...
> Thailand has accepted these Burmese as refugees, illegal immigrants,
> asylum seekers in its own free will. Thai business companies have given
> them works.
> These people frequently create problems between Burma and Thailand and
> between Burma and international communities.
>
> These problems have nothing to do with Burma's politic or Burma's
> economy. They are there for their own convinience, they went to other
> side telling all the tall stories about Burma, using Burma difficulties
> as their cover for being in Tahiland. They have been there for years,
> Thailand did nothing about it. Infact Thailand accepted them as cheap
> labours. Thailand benefits from them. These people are nothing but
> trouble makers for both Thailand and Burma.
>
> SPDC from one side is so very linient by saying it will accept them if
> they can prove themselves they are Burmese, the same as Rohingyas.
> These people went out with no documents on their own. They are law
> breakers. There are laws governing illegal immigrant.
>
> Thailand must know that if it doesn't deal with these illegal
> immigrants, there will be social tentions with will amount to one day
> they will ask for their automous region, their own independent land in
> Thailand challenging Thailand.
>
> There are many ethnic people who are living on bothside on Burma and
> Thailand. Nobody knows which country they belong to.
>
> My suggestion is , both Thailand and Burma should deal with them
> according to the laws of the land.
>
> On the other hand they should be handed over to UN and send them to
> countries which are preaching human rights which are the Champions in
> human rights. Let them take care of them.
>
> Sando.
>
>
>
> jirjis wrote:
>> Asia ; Myanmar wants workers in Thailand to return home:
>> 13 Hours,31 minutes Ago
>>
>>
>> [Asia News] BANGKOK : Myanmar's military rulers have asked
> Thailand to
>> force the estimated one million Myanmar workers to return home to be
> issued
>> with passports and other documents, a senior Thai minister said
> Tuesday.
>>
>>
>>
>> Myanmar sent a letter to the Thai foreign ministry last week
> asking
>> for the return of all immigrant workers so that authorities in Yangon
> could
>> verify their identity and issue passports and permits to work outside
> the
>> country, Deputy Prime Minister Surakiart Sathirathai said.
>>
>>
>>
>> "It would be difficult to send a million people to the border,"
>
>> Surakiart told reporters.
>>
>>
>>
>> "Thailand wants Myanmar to send officials to Bangkok to
> identify the
>> workers and issue all documents," he said.
>>
>> Nay ne la
>>
>> shwe ne mya
>>
>> rebuilding atlantis in the bay of bengal
>
 
G

Guest

Guest
Archived from groups: alt.games.half-life,alt.sufi,alt.surrealism,soc.culture.burma (More info?)

JJ said he intends to continue with what he is doing.

Surah IV 18

The forgiveness is not for those who do ill deeds until, when death
attendeth upon one of them, he saith: Lo! I repent now: nor yet for
those who die while they are disbelievers. For such We have prepared a
painful doom.

Lots of luck JJ, you are going to need all the help you can get.
 
G

Guest

Guest
Archived from groups: alt.games.half-life,alt.sufi,alt.surrealism,soc.culture.burma (More info?)

I intend to kindly continue cross-posting to alt.sufi whenever I feel that
what I am cross-posting to alt.sufi is of relevance to what I am discussing.

Best wishes,

JJ

<jayen466@my-deja.com> wrote in message
news:1113477563.974638.144090@f14g2000cwb.googlegroups.com...
Jirjis,

I would request that you kindly stop cross-posting to alt.sufi.

Please feel free to post directly to alt.sufi if you feel that what you
post is of relevance to what we are discussing.

Best wishes,

J.

jirjis wrote:
> no if
>
> un but
>
> 5 star cities
>
> international migration zone
>
> For the International Monetary Fund's chief economist, two big global
trends
> jump off the page - the growing role of developing countries in the
world
> economy and the ageing population of the developed world.
> And Raghu Rajan said in a BBC interview that the two trends could,
and
> should be linked.
>
> How? In short, because rich countries should be saving for their old
age.
> They should invest more in the developing world where there are
plenty of
> workers and a need for capital.
>
> The income from that investment could then pay for the pensions and
> healthcare needed by ageing populations in rich nations.
>
> Two-way street
>
> Mr Rajan said capital should be transferred "to younger populations
which
> will be able to use it more productively and pay a return which would
be a
> good thing for the developed economies in their old age".
>
> Another way the same benefits could be achieved is migration -
workers from
> the developing world moving to rich countries.
>
> He said: "Some mix of immigration and capital outflows will
eventually be a
> way of solving, quote unquote, the ageing problem."
>
> Mr Rajan said that developing countries already account for a growing
share
> of global activity, just because they are growing faster than the
rich
> countries. But he added: "They are typically more volatile, there are
more
> ups and downs."
>
> Problem or powerhouse?
>
> He said: "One of the biggest concerns in the world economy nowadays
is
> Chinese growth."
>
> The impact of China will vary from country to country, but it "is
something
> one wouldn't have thought of, any developing country being so central
to the
> world economy in the past", he said
>
> The volatility is one reason that savings don't go to the developing
world
> in the quantities that Mr Rajan thinks they should.
>
> He said developing country governments have not reformed their
financial
> systems enough to make them attractive and safe for investors from
rich
> countries.
>
> US imbalance
>
> But it's not just their fault. The rich countries, especially the
United
> States, should be saving more.
>
> The US is importing capital especially from Asia, when it should, he
said,
> be sending more abroad.
>
> American households need to save more. The government needs to reduce
the
> deficit in its own finances and borrow less from abroad - so more
would be
> available for investment in the developing world.
>
> The IMF's new report on the World Economic Outlook does identify a
source of
> savings that is providing more funds for investment in the developing

> world - money sent back home by migrant workers.
>
> It amounts to about $100bn (£52bn; 77bn euros) a year, and for some
> developing countries half of total capital inflows.
>
> Some of it is used for day-to-day spending, but a lot goes into
investment
> in small businesses.
>
> rebuilding atlantis in the Bay of Bengal.
>
>
>
> <shweminthame@aol.com> wrote in message
> news:1113465128.328429.304360@f14g2000cwb.googlegroups.com...
> > Thailand has accepted these Burmese as refugees, illegal
immigrants,
> > asylum seekers in its own free will. Thai business companies have
given
> > them works.
> > These people frequently create problems between Burma and Thailand
and
> > between Burma and international communities.
> >
> > These problems have nothing to do with Burma's politic or Burma's
> > economy. They are there for their own convinience, they went to
other
> > side telling all the tall stories about Burma, using Burma
difficulties
> > as their cover for being in Tahiland. They have been there for
years,
> > Thailand did nothing about it. Infact Thailand accepted them as
cheap
> > labours. Thailand benefits from them. These people are nothing but
> > trouble makers for both Thailand and Burma.
> >
> > SPDC from one side is so very linient by saying it will accept them
if
> > they can prove themselves they are Burmese, the same as Rohingyas.
> > These people went out with no documents on their own. They are law
> > breakers. There are laws governing illegal immigrant.
> >
> > Thailand must know that if it doesn't deal with these illegal
> > immigrants, there will be social tentions with will amount to one
day
> > they will ask for their automous region, their own independent land
in
> > Thailand challenging Thailand.
> >
> > There are many ethnic people who are living on bothside on Burma
and
> > Thailand. Nobody knows which country they belong to.
> >
> > My suggestion is , both Thailand and Burma should deal with them
> > according to the laws of the land.
> >
> > On the other hand they should be handed over to UN and send them to
> > countries which are preaching human rights which are the Champions
in
> > human rights. Let them take care of them.
> >
> > Sando.
> >
> >
> >
> > jirjis wrote:
> >> Asia ; Myanmar wants workers in Thailand to return home:
> >> 13 Hours,31 minutes Ago
> >>
> >>
> >> [Asia News] BANGKOK : Myanmar's military rulers have asked
> > Thailand to
> >> force the estimated one million Myanmar workers to return home to
be
> > issued
> >> with passports and other documents, a senior Thai minister said
> > Tuesday.
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >> Myanmar sent a letter to the Thai foreign ministry last week
> > asking
> >> for the return of all immigrant workers so that authorities in
Yangon
> > could
> >> verify their identity and issue passports and permits to work
outside
> > the
> >> country, Deputy Prime Minister Surakiart Sathirathai said.
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >> "It would be difficult to send a million people to the
border,"
> >
> >> Surakiart told reporters.
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >> "Thailand wants Myanmar to send officials to Bangkok to
> > identify the
> >> workers and issue all documents," he said.
> >>
> >> Nay ne la
> >>
> >> shwe ne mya
> >>
> >> rebuilding atlantis in the bay of bengal
> >