[SOLVED] AsRock B550 Phantom Gaming 4(not ac) iGPU issues with Ryzen 7 5700g

Oct 26, 2021
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So I had a Ryzen 3 3200g on this board before. I was using the iGPU as my primary video adaptor and the new version of the GeForce GT 710 with 4 HDMI outputs as my secondary adaptor for my 2 extra monitors. All was working fine. I just upgraded to a Ryzen 7 5700g and the iGPU just wont work. I tried to remove the GeForce and then it wont boot and sticks on the bios debug led, as if there were no GPU present. I am using the latest version of the bios, which is supposed to support the 5000g series. I am really at a loss here. I found that the specific model number supported for the 5700g is 100-000000263-00 which is the OEM one and I bought the retail one 100-100000263BOX. Could it be as stupid as that why it's not working? The "CPU part" is working fine however, scoring within the benchmark margin of error.


Links :
My CPU : https://www.newegg.ca/AMD-Ryzen-7-5700G-Ryzen-7-5000-G-Series/p/N82E16819113682?Item=N82E16819113682
CPU Support list : https://www.asrock.com/mb/AMD/B550 Phantom Gaming 4/#CPU
Bios : https://www.asrock.com/mb/AMD/B550 Phantom Gaming 4/#BIOS

Something weird about the bios I don't understand is they write "To support Ryzen 5000 G-series processors, it requires to update the BIOS with Matisse, Renoir or Vermeer CPU".
But my CPU is a Cezanne core...

Any insights would be helpful thanks!
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
So I had a Ryzen 3 3200g on this board before. I was using the iGPU as my primary video adaptor and the new version of the GeForce GT 710 with 4 HDMI outputs as my secondary adaptor for my 2 extra monitors. All was working fine. I just upgraded to a Ryzen 7 5700g and the iGPU just wont work. I tried to remove the GeForce and then it wont boot and sticks on the bios debug led, as if there were no GPU present. I am using the latest version of the bios, which is supposed to support the 5000g series. I am really at a loss here. I found that the specific model number supported for the 5700g is 100-000000263-00 which is the OEM one and I bought the retail one 100-100000263BOX. Could it be as stupid as that why it's not working?
No, that shouldn't matter. The only different in those is that one is the OEM and the other is the retail box, and aside from packaging and maybe a few small perks sometimes, there shouldn't be a difference in those part numbers. Also, did you try looking in the BIOS to see if the setting for the iGPU to be "Enabled" or "Both" or whatever your setting offers as choices, as the installation of a new CPU might have reset that CPU specific setting to a default of the discreet card. Worth checking first. If that doesn't work I would:

Try (With the Nvidia card completely removed from the motherboard) doing this:

BIOS Hard Reset procedure

Power off the unit, switch the PSU off and unplug the PSU cord from either the wall or the power supply.

Remove the motherboard CMOS battery for about three to five minutes. In some cases it may be necessary to remove the graphics card to access the CMOS battery.

During that five minutes while the CMOS battery is out of the motherboard, press the power button on the case, continuously, for 15-30 seconds, in order to deplete any residual charge that might be present in the CMOS circuit. After the five minutes is up, reinstall the CMOS battery making sure to insert it with the correct side up just as it came out.

If you had to remove the graphics card you can now reinstall it, but remember to reconnect your power cables if there were any attached to it as well as your display cable.

Now, plug the power supply cable back in, switch the PSU back on and power up the system. It should display the POST screen and the options to enter CMOS/BIOS setup. Enter the bios setup program and reconfigure the boot settings for either the Windows boot manager or for legacy systems, the drive your OS is installed on if necessary.

Save settings and exit. If the system will POST and boot then you can move forward from there including going back into the bios and configuring any other custom settings you may need to configure such as Memory XMP, A-XMP or D.O.C.P profile settings, custom fan profile settings or other specific settings you may have previously had configured that were wiped out by resetting the CMOS.

In some cases it may be necessary when you go into the BIOS after a reset, to load the Optimal default or Default values and then save settings, to actually get the hardware tables to reset in the boot manager.

It is probably also worth mentioning that for anything that might require an attempt to DO a hard reset in the first place, IF the problem is related to a lack of video signal, it is a GOOD IDEA to try a different type of display as many systems will not work properly for some reason with displayport configurations. It is worth trying HDMI if you are having no display or lack of visual ability to enter the BIOS, or no signal messages.

Trying a different monitor as well, if possible, is also a good idea if there is a lack of display. It happens.


And what they mean by "requires matisse, etc." is that you can't buy that board and a 5000 series CPU, if it still has an older BIOS version on it, and then just slap that 5000 series in there to try and update to the version that supports the 5000 series. You have to already have one of the older CPUs to get it updated to a version that will support the newer CPU, so that you can install the new CPU. That won't even be relevant for most people who buy one of them after that date because the majority, especially at larger retailers, will have already updated the board to a version that supports them regardless of what you have and those will likely say it right on the box.
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
So I had a Ryzen 3 3200g on this board before. I was using the iGPU as my primary video adaptor and the new version of the GeForce GT 710 with 4 HDMI outputs as my secondary adaptor for my 2 extra monitors. All was working fine. I just upgraded to a Ryzen 7 5700g and the iGPU just wont work. I tried to remove the GeForce and then it wont boot and sticks on the bios debug led, as if there were no GPU present. I am using the latest version of the bios, which is supposed to support the 5000g series. I am really at a loss here. I found that the specific model number supported for the 5700g is 100-000000263-00 which is the OEM one and I bought the retail one 100-100000263BOX. Could it be as stupid as that why it's not working?
No, that shouldn't matter. The only different in those is that one is the OEM and the other is the retail box, and aside from packaging and maybe a few small perks sometimes, there shouldn't be a difference in those part numbers. Also, did you try looking in the BIOS to see if the setting for the iGPU to be "Enabled" or "Both" or whatever your setting offers as choices, as the installation of a new CPU might have reset that CPU specific setting to a default of the discreet card. Worth checking first. If that doesn't work I would:

Try (With the Nvidia card completely removed from the motherboard) doing this:

BIOS Hard Reset procedure

Power off the unit, switch the PSU off and unplug the PSU cord from either the wall or the power supply.

Remove the motherboard CMOS battery for about three to five minutes. In some cases it may be necessary to remove the graphics card to access the CMOS battery.

During that five minutes while the CMOS battery is out of the motherboard, press the power button on the case, continuously, for 15-30 seconds, in order to deplete any residual charge that might be present in the CMOS circuit. After the five minutes is up, reinstall the CMOS battery making sure to insert it with the correct side up just as it came out.

If you had to remove the graphics card you can now reinstall it, but remember to reconnect your power cables if there were any attached to it as well as your display cable.

Now, plug the power supply cable back in, switch the PSU back on and power up the system. It should display the POST screen and the options to enter CMOS/BIOS setup. Enter the bios setup program and reconfigure the boot settings for either the Windows boot manager or for legacy systems, the drive your OS is installed on if necessary.

Save settings and exit. If the system will POST and boot then you can move forward from there including going back into the bios and configuring any other custom settings you may need to configure such as Memory XMP, A-XMP or D.O.C.P profile settings, custom fan profile settings or other specific settings you may have previously had configured that were wiped out by resetting the CMOS.

In some cases it may be necessary when you go into the BIOS after a reset, to load the Optimal default or Default values and then save settings, to actually get the hardware tables to reset in the boot manager.

It is probably also worth mentioning that for anything that might require an attempt to DO a hard reset in the first place, IF the problem is related to a lack of video signal, it is a GOOD IDEA to try a different type of display as many systems will not work properly for some reason with displayport configurations. It is worth trying HDMI if you are having no display or lack of visual ability to enter the BIOS, or no signal messages.

Trying a different monitor as well, if possible, is also a good idea if there is a lack of display. It happens.


And what they mean by "requires matisse, etc." is that you can't buy that board and a 5000 series CPU, if it still has an older BIOS version on it, and then just slap that 5000 series in there to try and update to the version that supports the 5000 series. You have to already have one of the older CPUs to get it updated to a version that will support the newer CPU, so that you can install the new CPU. That won't even be relevant for most people who buy one of them after that date because the majority, especially at larger retailers, will have already updated the board to a version that supports them regardless of what you have and those will likely say it right on the box.
 
Oct 26, 2021
2
0
10
0
Power off the unit, switch the PSU off and unplug the PSU cord from either the wall or the power supply.

Remove the motherboard CMOS battery for about three to five minutes. In some cases it may be necessary to remove the graphics card to access the CMOS battery.

During that five minutes while the CMOS battery is out of the motherboard, press the power button on the case, continuously, for 15-30 seconds, in order to deplete any residual charge that might be present in the CMOS circuit.
Yeah that's one thing I tried before posting on the forum. However I had not unplugged the PSU from the wall or hit the power button repeatedly. Doing so fixed the issue. Thanks for your help and for making me learn something new today!
 

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