Asrock z390 Phantom ITX - I set the core ratio to 5ghz but it still runs at stock speed

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Dec 30, 2018
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I set the core ratio to 50 (5ghz), set all current/power limits to max, and changed the voltage to 1.4v, (which everyone says is too high, but I'm used to running my CPU's at 1.4-1.5v and it never broke it), but when I boot into windows it still runs at stock speeds. Then when I restart into the BIOS, it shows that it should be running at 5ghz. What's going on? Please don't just comment to say "omg that's such high voltage." I don't care, that wasn't my question, unless that's the reason it won't run at the speed I set it at.
 

jfriend00

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Without any data to go on, my guess would be that your system is adapting to the load. When there's no load, it runs slowly to conserve energy/heat. When you put it under full load, it will run at the speed you set it.

To know for sure, you'd probably have to show us a couple things:


    ■ Screen shot (or photos) of the appropriate screens in the BIOS where you configured this.
    ■ Screen shot of the core speeds for each core in either HWiNFO64 or CPUID HWMonitor while running a significant stress test such as Prime95 or AIDA64.
 
Dec 30, 2018
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I was testing it under load with AIDA 64 and it was still running at stock speed (4ghz). I figured out how to fix it though. I just had to turn thermal throttling off, and a couple other pesky intel settings had to be tuned off. Now it's running at 5ghz no problem, and I was able to dial back the Vcore to 1.375 volts and still stable in prime95 small FFT's. Thanks.
 

jfriend00

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Turning thermal throttling off is a bad thing. If that benefits you, then it means you have insufficient cooling for your CPU and you may ruin it over time by running it too hot. Get a better cooler and install it correctly.

When you run Prime95, what max core temperatures are you seeing after you've run it for 10 minutes or so?
 
Dec 30, 2018
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I'm not stupid, I always keep my CPU below 99 degrees celsius and I'm using one of the best coolers, it's mounted directly on the die and it's a Thermalright IB-E Extreme. Also, I will say from experience with past overclocking that if you perfectly dial in the Vcore voltage, your CPU will become unstable and your system will crash before it gets so hot that it damages the CPU. As the temp increases it needs more voltage to remain stable, which creates sort of a "thermal throttling" if you will, but instead of the CPU actually throttling down, it just crashes. That happens due to the physics of how CPUs respond to voltage at different temps, not due to software of course.
 

jfriend00

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If you had a good cooler installation, your CPU should not be above 85C and should never trigger thermal throttling. If you're in the high 90s, then something is likely wrong with the cooler installation. Either bad thermal mount to the die, insufficient cooler air flow or insufficient case air flow or something related.

FYI, I'm running a somewhat similar looking air cooler (Noctua NH-D15) on an i7-9700k and can run 5.0GHz with Prime95 for a long time and stay below 83C without turning any thermal throttling off.

Also, if you want people to help you here, lose the attitude. Just trying to help dude. Triggering thermal throttling means insufficient cooling for the load you're applying - period.

 
Dec 30, 2018
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Actually, since the T junction of Intel CPU's is 99 degrees, and they start throttling at somewhere in the 80 degree range, triggering thermal throttling doesn't necessarily mean insufficient cooling, it just means Intel set it to start throttling earlier than necessary. Many laptops run at 99 degrees Celsius, yet they start to throttle down in the 80 degree range regardless... Why? I don't know. Maybe that's so that the performance isn't really fast for a while, and then just hit a wall and get noticeably slower when it hits the T junction. You are right that my TIM is very bad (it's a heavily worn IC graphite pad and those never gave me good results when used directly on dies, even when new), and I was using a very weak 900rpm fan. That's why I'm getting such high temperatures. That will all change when I get good thermal paste and nice fans to install.
 

thtran6

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I Second this.

Now in response to the OP:

I'm 100% sure nobody in this forum will say any temp barely below 99C is safe for any chip. Very likely there will be temp spike it hits 100C or even above.

Please refer this Intel Temperature Guide:
http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/id-1800828/intel-temperature-guide.html

Excerpt from the article:
"Here's the nominal operating range for Core temperature:
Core temperatures above 85°C are not recommended.
Core temperatures below 80°C are ideal."

Also take a closer look at SECTION 6 - THROTTLE TEMPERATURE

9th Generation 14 nanometer i7 9700K / i5 9600K (TDP 95W / Idle 2W),
8th Generation 14 nanometer i7 8700K / i5 8600K (TDP 95W / Idle 2W),
7th Generation 14 nanometer i7 7700K / i5 7600K (TDP 91W / Idle 2W),
6th Generation 14 nanometer i7 6700K / i5 6600K (TDP 91W / Idle 2W):
Tj Max (Throttle temperature) = 100°C

5th Generation 14 nanometer i7 5775C / i5 5675C (TDP 65W / Idle 2W):
Tj Max (Throttle temperature) = 96°C

4th Generation 22 nanometer i7 4790K / i5 4690K (TDP 88W / Idle 2W),
4th Generation 22 nanometer i7 4770K / i5 4670K (TDP 84W / Idle 2W):
Tj Max (Throttle temperature) = 100°C


As you can see, the throttle temperature for these chips are quite high, instead of the 80C that you claimed.
Therefore, if you constantly hit thermal throttling (assuming this is the correct cause), then you must be running your chip around 100C all the times. I'm not sure anybody on this forum will say this is a good idea that is worth defending!
"Triggering thermal throttling doesn't necessarily mean insufficient cooling" - Yes it does. If you have the appropriate cooling, you will 100% NOT experience thermal throttling. After all, this is exactly what thermal throttling was created for!".

With regard to your Vcore, that is also an extremely high number that would shorten the life of your chip significantly. 1.4 Vcore should be the absolutely max you should go with. I have barely seen anybody going above 1.4, let alone 1.5 just for a 5.0 Ghz overclock.
Honestly, most i7 chips hit 5.0 Ghz with 1.25 Vcore easily, translating to a temp of less than 80C. If you chip requires 1.4~1.5 Vcore all the times to run just 5.0 Ghz, then you just have a really bad chip.

Regarding cooling solution, I have an average AIO (EVGA 280 clc with custom Noctua fans) and I'm running my i7-8700k @5.2 Ghz with a max temp of 72C when stressing under Prime 95.5 version 26.6 small FFT test for 10 hours.

So when you say you have "one of the best coolers", IDK how that translates to nearly 100C which cause thermal throttling. Whatever cooler you're currently having, if the vendor claimed it is one of the best coolers, I would say scam. Either this or your thermal paste is applied wayyyy wrong, which, even if so, shouldn't raise temp to 99~100C.
 

Rogue Leader

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Welcome to Tom's. I see you have made yourself at home asking a question. However it looks like you haven't gotten the responses you were expecting. That is fine, as is dissent and discussion.

Whats not fine? Repeatedly posting personal insults, profanity, and other argumentative jabs. Those posts have been deleted and for that your post is now closed and you're taking a day off to cool off. Come back and act correctly, or you won't be posting ever again.
 
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