[SOLVED] Assassin's Creed Origins constantly crashing after GPU 3D spikes

jamok99

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Not sure whether this is better listed under games or GPUs, but the issue has been driving me crazy.
After launching Ass Creed Origins, somewhere between 1 and about 20 minutes into gameplay, the game constantly crashes. Usually, the music keeps playing, but the screen itself is frozen, with no cursor to move around. If I'm able, I have to use Task Manager to end the AC Origins process to get control of my computer back. When it won't open TM, I have to do a reset.
Now, I've searched all the forums and done all the things that a mid-tech competent person can do, and nothing helps. The one telltale error that (I hope) leads to a solutions is this: In looking at Task Manager after a crash, under the 'Performance' tab, every crash is directly preceeded by two spikes in the 3D graph associated with my 3060ti GPU - the first is usually about 80, then a very brief dip to 0, followed by a quick spike to 100, followed by a quck return to 0, indicating the post-crash value. . I don't know what this is indicative of, but it occurs without fail in these crashes. I might add that aside from these 3D spikes associated with the crash, there seems to be no other 3D activity that preceeds a crash during gameplay.
Yes, all my drivers are up to date (including Nvidia - clean boot of GPU drivers), and the things I've tried are far too long to list.
My rig is a Win 11 Gigabyte Aorus Pro DDR5 Z690 mobo, Intel 12700K CPU, Asus LHR 3060ti OC GPU, 16gb x 2 Kingston Fury DDR 6000 RAM which works fine with XMP profile for everything else, and a Gigabyte G2 850w gold PSU. No component is overclocked by me, it's all factory settings. I have seen this crashing issue, on so many forums, and with so many games (including others playing Ass Creed Origins), with so many supposed 'fixes' that it's so clearly a widespread problem. But none of the fixes proposed has any effect on this problem.
I'm not super-tech savvy, so an 18-step list of technical things isn't going to help me. If someone has an idea that I can carry out, particularly given that suspicious 3D graph spike, I'd be very grateful. Thanks in advance.
 
Last edited:

Ralston18

Titan
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I tend to view multiple errors and varying errors as a sign of PSU/Power problems.

Not a sure thing by any means.

Things to do:

Run the built in windows troubleshooters, "sfc /scanno", and"dism" to determine if Windows can find and fix something.

References:

https://www.lifewire.com/how-to-use-sfc-scannow-to-repair-windows-system-files-2626161

How to use DISM command tool to repair Windows 10 image | Windows Central

Then ensure that all drivers are up to date - especially GPU. Manually download drivers directly from the applicable manufacturer's website. Reinstall, and reconfigure as applicable. No third party installers or tools.

Next: power down, unplug, and open the case.

Clean out dust and debris.

Verify by sight and feel that all connectors, cards, RAM, jumpers, and case connections are all fully and firmly in place.

Continue checking Reliability History and Event Viewer for additional errors, changing errors, or perhaps some pattern of errors.
 

jamok99

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Also look in Reliability History and Event Viewer.
Ralston - Thanks for your reply! I wasn't familiar with those two programs - but I took a look at each, and while I can't really interpret what catagories are most important, or what the different designations (information, warning, error) specifically mean, there are lots or warnings and errors. Some of them are actually obvious to me - something like system shut down unexpectedly (yup, those must be the numerous-per-day crashes of Origins.) I get a couple of hardware and/or software failures at times. If I can, would posting some of them here be of any helpl? Thanks. (I'm actually writing this from another computer, otherwise I'd just post what I might be able to copy and paste now.)
 

jamok99

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Also look in Reliability History and Event Viewer.
Ralston - In event viewer and reliability history, can you tell me exactly what I'm looking for, so perhaps I can post it here? I'm finding so many warnings/errors/info that I'm not sure which would be helpful. For instance in event viewer, under administrator events, I get (this is just the most recent portion of it:
Warning 11/11/2022 4:39:01 PM DNS Client Events (Microsoft-Windows-DNS-Client) 1014 (1014)
Error 11/11/2022 3:30:44 PM System Restore 8193 None
Error 11/11/2022 3:29:36 PM Kernel-EventTracing 3 Session
Warning 11/11/2022 3:29:36 PM Kernel-EventTracing 4 Logging
Warning 11/11/2022 2:19:14 PM DistributedCOM 10016 None
Error 11/11/2022 2:19:01 PM Server 2505 None
Warning 11/11/2022 2:18:57 PM User Device Registration 360 None
Warning 11/11/2022 2:18:57 PM DistributedCOM 10016 None
Warning 11/11/2022 2:18:55 PM e2fexpress 27 None


Warning 11/10/2022 11:01:13 PM DistributedCOM 10016 None
Warning 11/10/2022 11:01:13 PM DistributedCOM 10016 None
Warning 11/10/2022 11:00:35 PM DistributedCOM 10016 None
Warning 11/10/2022 11:00:18 PM Kernel-Processor-Power (Microsoft-Windows-Kernel-Processor-Power) 37 (7)
Warning 11/10/2022 11:00:18 PM Kernel-Processor-Power (Microsoft-Windows-Kernel-Processor-Power) 37 (7)
Warning 11/10/2022 11:00:18 PM Kernel-Processor-Power (Microsoft-Windows-Kernel-Processor-Power) 37 (7)
Warning 11/10/2022 10:59:40 PM DistributedCOM 10016 None

For reliability history, yes, there's 3 or 4 or so 'events' a day. Some of them are simply that Windows shut down unexpectedly. (Duh - yes, it crashed.) The most recent (nov. 10th) event that has details to it says: "
Description
The computer has rebooted from a bugcheck. The bugcheck was: 0x000001aa (0x0000000005d4e9e8, 0x0000000000000003, 0xffffc181622b3900, 0xfffff506569d69e8). A dump was saved in: C:\Windows\MEMORY.DMP. Report Id: 00000000-0000-0000-0000-000000000000."

However, 1. The memory dump file within C:/Windows/MEMORY.DMP says it's 1.5 gb in size. There's another dump file by itself in just the C drive folder, and it's small, but no matter what I do (I am the administrator) it tells me I don't have permission to open that file, to ask your administrator.

I'm embarrassed to be this technically deficient in public. But if you, or someone else, could give me a bit more direction on what might help to post here and how to do it, I'd be grateful.
 

Ralston18

Titan
Moderator
I tend to view multiple errors and varying errors as a sign of PSU/Power problems.

Not a sure thing by any means.

Things to do:

Run the built in windows troubleshooters, "sfc /scanno", and"dism" to determine if Windows can find and fix something.

References:

https://www.lifewire.com/how-to-use-sfc-scannow-to-repair-windows-system-files-2626161

How to use DISM command tool to repair Windows 10 image | Windows Central

Then ensure that all drivers are up to date - especially GPU. Manually download drivers directly from the applicable manufacturer's website. Reinstall, and reconfigure as applicable. No third party installers or tools.

Next: power down, unplug, and open the case.

Clean out dust and debris.

Verify by sight and feel that all connectors, cards, RAM, jumpers, and case connections are all fully and firmly in place.

Continue checking Reliability History and Event Viewer for additional errors, changing errors, or perhaps some pattern of errors.
 

jamok99

Distinguished
Nov 30, 2014
69
0
18,530
0
I tend to view multiple errors and varying errors as a sign of PSU/Power problems.

Not a sure thing by any means.

Things to do:

Run the built in windows troubleshooters, "sfc /scanno", and"dism" to determine if Windows can find and fix something.

References:

https://www.lifewire.com/how-to-use-sfc-scannow-to-repair-windows-system-files-2626161

How to use DISM command tool to repair Windows 10 image | Windows Central

Then ensure that all drivers are up to date - especially GPU. Manually download drivers directly from the applicable manufacturer's website. Reinstall, and reconfigure as applicable. No third party installers or tools.

Next: power down, unplug, and open the case.

Clean out dust and debris.

Verify by sight and feel that all connectors, cards, RAM, jumpers, and case connections are all fully and firmly in place.

Continue checking Reliability History and Event Viewer for additional errors, changing errors, or perhaps some pattern of errors.
Ralston,
Thanksfor all the suggestions. May take me some time to work thorugh all that, but hopefully it's productive.
One question: Is the 3D spike that's present at every crash likely indicative of this being a particular problem, such as the PSU you mentioned? Or could it, as you imply have any number of causes?
Also, I'm assuming that the DISM command tool will work with Win 11, in addition to the 'repair Windows 10 image' you mentioned.
Lastly, I have an old, but operative, Win 10 computer as well. I'm thinking of setting up Origins on that and see if the same problems happens. Lots of folks on different forums cite this same problem on Win 10 and Win 7. I'm thinking that if it fails on Win 10 as well, I'm likely dealing with a software problem from Ubisoft. On one Ubisoft Connect forum a developer said that Ubi took responsibility for these problems with Origins, and a patch would be on the way. That was a couple of months ago, and of course, they've produced nada.
Thanks so much for your time and help with this!
 

Ralston18

Titan
Moderator
3D spike vs PSU. Software vs Hardware.

Reading back I would give the PSU the benefit of the doubt for the moment. Especially if there are reported problems with Origin. Could be demanding some peak power level (spike) that causes the crashes.

I am not aware of any problems using dism with Windows 11.

No worries about being "technically deficient". None of it is really simple and like many things end consumers are often at a disadvantage when it comes to resolving problems with any products. DIY (Do It Yourself) is becoming more and more problematic for lack of information (aka "Check Engine"), and all sorts of other manufacturer actions to discourage or prevent repairs.

You can try the old Windows 10 computer. However it will likely need quite a number of updates before it is caught up. And the computer may or may not be stable.

There are a couple of members here that are experienced with memory dumps and at some time (if all else fails) a memory dump can be posted/provided.

In the meantime: were you able to check inside the case, etc..? If you are not comfortable doing so then find a knowledgeable family member or friend to help.

Just take your time and be methodical.
 

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