Question Assistance with a newbie, extending my internet

Sep 26, 2022
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Hi Thanks for the add .
I have been researching for 3 days on which is the best cost effective method of extending internet to my shop which is 30 ft from my home.
I finally was able to get fiber internet to my home last year through our local communications company.
I use Linksys WiFi router to get internet through my small home with no issue but unable to get WiFi in my metal(steel) building right next door.
I am transitioning my career to remote work and it would be an issue to work inside my home since I have pets. Setting up an office in my metal building would be more productive, IF I can get good internet over in there. The current internet speed is around 80-100. I have a photo of my Linksys router and the fiber modem but it won’t allow me to include it.
I know nothing about fiber or the latest tech on the market, so what would be the best possible way to extend my internet so I can start working?
I appreciate your help greatly! Thank you
 

Barty1884

Retired Moderator
Really depends on how 'professional' you want it, whether latency is a concern (vs strictly functional) and a few other hazards.

The "best" way would be to trench to 30ft run to the other building and run a cable (either direct burial or through conduit) to the building. That's a little to a lot destructive, depending on where your router is in your home relative to the detached building or any obstacles in the way (landscaping, concrete etc).

If you just wanted it to 'work', an outdoor rated cable could be run across the surface - far from the cleanest, will highly depend on your climate & becomes a tripping hazard &/or chewing hazard if those are pets of the doggo variety or similar.

One of the 'easier' options, would be a wireless access point or two. 30ft, assuming reasonable line of site shouldn't be an issue for even 5GHz bands. Your sticking point is likely the steel construction. An AP mounted to the exterior, with the best line of site should pick up the Wifi signal from even your Linksys router........ from that proximity, it should be able to penetrate the building - OR you could run ethernet off the AP into the shop.
An even stronger option would be to have a dedicated AP on your house side (wired from the router) - inside or outside (preferred) sending the signal, not relying on your router - unless it's close to where you'd want to mount an AP anyway.

APs will need power, which can get tricky for outdoor mounts etc. Should be easy enough on the home side, but same rules apply. An option would be POE (Power over ethernet). If you wanted to take ethernet into the shop from the AP, you could power it with a POE switch on the shop-side. Not only would it power the AP and get you an ethernet run in one, it's also a switch - giving you X number of ports in the shop.


A properly buried (and protected) ethernet run would be the 'ideal' here, but is more labour & cost intensive.

Relying on Wifi to go the distance will result in some latency and speed loss - so it really depends on what you need it for in the shop.
 
Sep 26, 2022
6
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10
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Really depends on how 'professional' you want it, whether latency is a concern (vs strictly functional) and a few other hazards.

The "best" way would be to trench to 30ft run to the other building and run a cable (either direct burial or through conduit) to the building. That's a little to a lot destructive, depending on where your router is in your home relative to the detached building or any obstacles in the way (landscaping, concrete etc).

If you just wanted it to 'work', an outdoor rated cable could be run across the surface - far from the cleanest, will highly depend on your climate & becomes a tripping hazard &/or chewing hazard if those are pets of the doggo variety or similar.

One of the 'easier' options, would be a wireless access point or two. 30ft, assuming reasonable line of site shouldn't be an issue for even 5GHz bands. Your sticking point is likely the steel construction. An AP mounted to the exterior, with the best line of site should pick up the Wifi signal from even your Linksys router........ from that proximity, it should be able to penetrate the building - OR you could run ethernet off the AP into the shop.
An even stronger option would be to have a dedicated AP on your house side (wired from the router) - inside or outside (preferred) sending the signal, not relying on your router - unless it's close to where you'd want to mount an AP anyway.

APs will need power, which can get tricky for outdoor mounts etc. Should be easy enough on the home side, but same rules apply. An option would be POE (Power over ethernet). If you wanted to take ethernet into the shop from the AP, you could power it with a POE switch on the shop-side. Not only would it power the AP and get you an ethernet run in one, it's also a switch - giving you X number of ports in the shop.


A properly buried (and protected) ethernet run would be the 'ideal' here, but is more labour & cost intensive.

Relying on Wifi to go the distance will result in some latency and speed loss - so it really depends on what you need it for in the shop.
Thanks for assisting Barty.
I would like to connect my laptop to an Ethernet cable so I have less issues..
Knowing very little, so I could run an Ethernet cable from my router , through a conduit in trench into shop? Or would I need AP once I get the cable in shop. When you say outdoor rated cable, would that be Ethernet or what type of cable.
I’m not worried about professional simply because I’m on budget but I just want it to work.
 
You do not need a actual AP.

If you only have the single machine hooked up via ethernet you need nothing else.

If you have multiple machines that need ethernet and/or you need wifi you can use a old router you have laying around as a AP. You can also buy a inexpensive router. The only concern would be if you want more than 100mbps in the remote building you need to have a device that has gigabit ports.

If you want to dig a actual trench and bury conduit that is the best option. It is easier to just use outdoor direct bury cable. You can then take a shovel and cut a slot type trench only a couple inches deep. Just deep enough to not be easily damaged.

Be careful. You want to buy outdoor direct bury cable BUT be very sure it is pure copper. A lot of it is CCA. Also do not buy than flat or thin cables, I have never seen outdoor cable like that. The wire size needs to be 22-24.

You can get patch cable made from outdoor rated cable but it tends to be a more professional looking install if you use bulk cable and then put keystone jacks and wall plates on each end. You then use a short patch cable to connect between these jacks and your main router and the device you are using in the remote location.

It is actually technically simple all the work is getting the cable run and buried.
 
Reactions: SouthBasin
Sep 26, 2022
6
0
10
0
You do not need a actual AP.

If you only have the single machine hooked up via ethernet you need nothing else.

If you have multiple machines that need ethernet and/or you need wifi you can use a old router you have laying around as a AP. You can also buy a inexpensive router. The only concern would be if you want more than 100mbps in the remote building you need to have a device that has gigabit ports.

If you want to dig a actual trench and bury conduit that is the best option. It is easier to just use outdoor direct bury cable. You can then take a shovel and cut a slot type trench only a couple inches deep. Just deep enough to not be easily damaged.

Be careful. You want to buy outdoor direct bury cable BUT be very sure it is pure copper. A lot of it is CCA. Also do not buy than flat or thin cables, I have never seen outdoor cable like that. The wire size needs to be 22-24.

You can get patch cable made from outdoor rated cable but it tends to be a more professional looking install if you use bulk cable and then put keystone jacks and wall plates on each end. You then use a short patch cable to connect between these jacks and your main router and the device you are using in the remote location.

It is actually technically simple all the work is getting the cable run and buried.
Thanks Bill for assisting
I don’t mind digging a small trench, I did it for my dog wire around the yard perimeter.
Could you post a pic of the cable looks like, which one I should use?
 

Barty1884

Retired Moderator
Thanks for assisting Barty.
I would like to connect my laptop to an Ethernet cable so I have less issues..
Knowing very little, so I could run an Ethernet cable from my router , through a conduit in trench into shop? Or would I need AP once I get the cable in shop. When you say outdoor rated cable, would that be Ethernet or what type of cable.
I’m not worried about professional simply because I’m on budget but I just want it to work.
Mostly covered off now, but the AP isn't required if you're prepared to trench. you can just run it straight through the trench & out, into the building.
HOWEVER, depending on your climate*, you may want to add an ethernet surge protector at each building. If you just run straight through with a direct burial cable likely not very far below the surface.... a lightning strike could fry the ethernet port(s) on your laptop + router, at a minimum.

*Regardless of your climate, even if it's a minor risk, it's avoidable. Ubiquiti's are $12.50 USD/each.... and I'm sure there are less-known brands for a little bit less:
https://store.ui.com/collections/operator-accessories/products/ethernet-surge-protector

~$25 investment is probably worth it for most.

Is this a suitable wire?

GearIT Cat6 Outdoor Ethernet Cable (75ft) 23AWG Pure Copper, FTP, LLDPE, Waterproof, Direct Burial, In-Ground, UV Resistant, POE, Network, LAN, Internet, Cat 6, Cat6 Cable - 75 Feet https://a.co/d/0KxePfn
It looks to be.... although add is a little misleading as you get down to the details and your options are CCA or "OFC".... yet the add lists "Pure Copper".
 
Sep 26, 2022
6
0
10
0
Mostly covered off now, but the AP isn't required if you're prepared to trench. you can just run it straight through the trench & out, into the building.
HOWEVER, depending on your climate*, you may want to add an ethernet surge protector at each building. If you just run straight through with a direct burial cable likely not very far below the surface.... a lightning strike could fry the ethernet port(s) on your laptop + router, at a minimum.

*Regardless of your climate, even if it's a minor risk, it's avoidable. Ubiquiti's are $12.50 USD/each.... and I'm sure there are less-known brands for a little bit less:
https://store.ui.com/collections/operator-accessories/products/ethernet-surge-protector

~$25 investment is probably worth it for most.



It looks to be.... although add is a little misleading as you get down to the details and your options are CCA or "OFC".... yet the add lists "Pure Copper".
Thank you for helping me, I greatly appreciate it.
I didn’t think of the Ethernet surge protector, I’m glad you mentioned it. As I understand so far,
Ethernet cable out of router to surge protector then keystone Jack in wall, then Ethernet cable out of exterior wall keystone Jack across yard in trench, into building keystone jacks, then to Surge protector , then to laptop.
sounds simple. So don’t even connect from modem.
I think the hardest part will be installing keystone jacks.
 

Barty1884

Retired Moderator
That cable looks fine but it appears gearit also sells crap so you have to be careful. As mentioned they also sell cca outdoor cable and it costs a lot less so just be careful to not buy the crap
Agreed. And no matter what, inspect the packaging very closely when it shows up. Any reference to CCA, send it back - don't even open it. They wouldn't be the first manufacturer/seller to advertise one thing & ship another.
 

Barty1884

Retired Moderator
Thank you for helping me, I greatly appreciate it.
I didn’t think of the Ethernet surge protector, I’m glad you mentioned it. As I understand so far,
Ethernet cable out of router to surge protector then keystone Jack in wall, then Ethernet cable out of exterior wall keystone Jack across yard in trench, into building keystone jacks, then to Surge protector , then to laptop.
sounds simple.
I think the hardest part will be installing keystone jacks.
Depending on your comfort level & how professional you want everything to be - you might have some additional steps in there.

You could go straight through walls, into surge protectors & just caulk around the holes.
 

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