Question ASUS FX505D "Power Throttled" brand new laptop, what to do

Dec 31, 2019
3
2
15
0
Hi,

I just bought an ASUS laptop yesterday. The model is ASUS TUF Gaming FX505D. Specs are RTX 2060, Ryzen 3750, 16 GB of RAM. I have another desktop which has a GTX 1060, 16 GB of RAM and an Intel i5-7400. I've tried only one game so far on both (DotA 2) and I was getting about 20-30 less FPS on my laptop which I think shouldn't be happening. It was also getting kinda hot and noisy with the fans so I installed MSI Afterburner to monitor usages. Both CPU/GPU usages capped around 60-70% and it said that a power limit was reached when I turned on that setting.

Is there anything I can do from my end to reduce this? Is this normal for laptops? I've never owned a gaming laptop before so I don't know. Would a cooling pad help? Do I need to get it replaced or is it just a feature of gaming laptops? Any help would be great!
 

cdrkf

Distinguished
Hi,

I just bought an ASUS laptop yesterday. The model is ASUS TUF Gaming FX505D. Specs are RTX 2060, Ryzen 3750, 16 GB of RAM. I have another desktop which has a GTX 1060, 16 GB of RAM and an Intel i5-7400. I've tried only one game so far on both (DotA 2) and I was getting about 20-30 less FPS on my laptop which I think shouldn't be happening. It was also getting kinda hot and noisy with the fans so I installed MSI Afterburner to monitor usages. Both CPU/GPU usages capped around 60-70% and it said that a power limit was reached when I turned on that setting.

Is there anything I can do from my end to reduce this? Is this normal for laptops? I've never owned a gaming laptop before so I don't know. Would a cooling pad help? Do I need to get it replaced or is it just a feature of gaming laptops? Any help would be great!
Hi, this sounds typical behaviour for laptops- a laptop power adaptor is usually 120W, a GTX 1060 (or desktop RTX 2060) can draw more than that on their own without the rest of the system.

You will find with more demanding games you can get comparatively more out of the laptop than with something light like Dota 2. That is an old game and runs at very high fps on most machine- the laptop will simply hit the power cap before it hits the performance limit.

You would be better testing with something very graphically demanding that will max out of the RTX 2060 without hitting very high frame rates. For example download the latest version of the 3D Mark Demo (Time Spy is the current one I believe) and run that on both machines, that should perform better on the laptop.
 
Dec 31, 2019
3
2
15
0
Hi, this sounds typical behaviour for laptops- a laptop power adaptor is usually 120W, a GTX 1060 (or desktop RTX 2060) can draw more than that on their own without the rest of the system.

You will find with more demanding games you can get comparatively more out of the laptop than with something light like Dota 2. That is an old game and runs at very high fps on most machine- the laptop will simply hit the power cap before it hits the performance limit.

You would be better testing with something very graphically demanding that will max out of the RTX 2060 without hitting very high frame rates. For example download the latest version of the 3D Mark Demo (Time Spy is the current one I believe) and run that on both machines, that should perform better on the laptop.
I ran a 3D Graphics Mark benchmark and my score was 8962. Apparently the average was 10552, so I guess it's fine since it's a laptop, not a desktop?
 
Reactions: cdrkf

cdrkf

Distinguished
I ran a 3D Graphics Mark benchmark and my score was 8962. Apparently the average was 10552, so I guess it's fine since it's a laptop, not a desktop?
Yeah nVidia don't differentiate between the laptop and desktop graphics boards (but the laptop RTX cards, whilst using the same chip do run at lower clocks), so that sounds reasonable.
 

ASK THE COMMUNITY

TRENDING THREADS