Question ASUS Maximus VII Hero, Many/Random Beeps After Losing Power During Storm

Sep 20, 2020
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We lost power last night which also turned my computer off. Today, I've been plagued with non-stop beeping. PC seems to be running fine, temps are good, but I can't find any definitive answer to what is actually going on here! Any help is much appreciated as I'm a total noob with all of this! I have looked up error codes and have seen everything from CPU failure to CPU timing is off, to bad battery. Help?

There are other beep patterns not in this video, as well. I just had 3 quick beeps. 2 beeps, pause, followed by 4 beeps. 1 beep, pause, 4 beeps. It's very random and changes constantly.

View: https://youtu.be/h6W3weAXV9A


Current specs:

Intel Core i7-4790K 4.0GHz
Corsair Hydro H60 Liquid Cooling
16GB (2x8GB) DDR3 1600MHz
Nvidia Geforce GTX 980 4GB (SC version)
Corsair Enthusiast Series RM750 750 Watt 80 Plus Gold
Win 10 64-Bit
 
Last edited:

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
Have you tried resetting the CMOS/BIOS?

BIOS Hard Reset procedure

Power off the unit, switch the PSU off and unplug the PSU cord from either the wall or the power supply.

Remove the motherboard CMOS battery for about three to five minutes. In some cases it may be necessary to remove the graphics card to access the CMOS battery.

During that five minutes while the CMOS battery is out of the motherboard, press the power button on the case, continuously, for 15-30 seconds, in order to deplete any residual charge that might be present in the CMOS circuit. After the five minutes is up, reinstall the CMOS battery making sure to insert it with the correct side up just as it came out.

If you had to remove the graphics card you can now reinstall it, but remember to reconnect your power cables if there were any attached to it as well as your display cable.

Now, plug the power supply cable back in, switch the PSU back on and power up the system. It should display the POST screen and the options to enter CMOS/BIOS setup. Enter the bios setup program and reconfigure the boot settings for either the Windows boot manager or for legacy systems, the drive your OS is installed on if necessary.

Save settings and exit. If the system will POST and boot then you can move forward from there including going back into the bios and configuring any other custom settings you may need to configure such as Memory XMP, A-XMP or D.O.C.P profile settings, custom fan profile settings or other specific settings you may have previously had configured that were wiped out by resetting the CMOS.

In some cases it may be necessary when you go into the BIOS after a reset, to load the Optimal default or Default values and then save settings, to actually get the hardware tables to reset in the boot manager.

 
Sep 20, 2020
7
0
10
0
Have you tried resetting the CMOS/BIOS?

BIOS Hard Reset procedure

Power off the unit, switch the PSU off and unplug the PSU cord from either the wall or the power supply.

Remove the motherboard CMOS battery for about three to five minutes. In some cases it may be necessary to remove the graphics card to access the CMOS battery.

During that five minutes while the CMOS battery is out of the motherboard, press the power button on the case, continuously, for 15-30 seconds, in order to deplete any residual charge that might be present in the CMOS circuit. After the five minutes is up, reinstall the CMOS battery making sure to insert it with the correct side up just as it came out.

If you had to remove the graphics card you can now reinstall it, but remember to reconnect your power cables if there were any attached to it as well as your display cable.

Now, plug the power supply cable back in, switch the PSU back on and power up the system. It should display the POST screen and the options to enter CMOS/BIOS setup. Enter the bios setup program and reconfigure the boot settings for either the Windows boot manager or for legacy systems, the drive your OS is installed on if necessary.

Save settings and exit. If the system will POST and boot then you can move forward from there including going back into the bios and configuring any other custom settings you may need to configure such as Memory XMP, A-XMP or D.O.C.P profile settings, custom fan profile settings or other specific settings you may have previously had configured that were wiped out by resetting the CMOS.

In some cases it may be necessary when you go into the BIOS after a reset, to load the Optimal default or Default values and then save settings, to actually get the hardware tables to reset in the boot manager.
I appreciate your reply! I did exactly this, and I did have to remove my GPU, as the battery was behind it. Waited more than 5 minutes, did the residual charge thing, put in a brand new battery and put everything together. I did have to put in new BIOS values, and went with the Optimal Default settings. The first 1/2 hour or so was great, no beeps at all. Then they started again, with what sounds like a fan noise kicking in after a few of them. Now the fan no longer kicks in, but random beeps, always different codes, keep coming in every 3-10 minutes. Again, all my temps are good, all ram is seated correctly. The only thing that happened was we lost power in a storm and my PC was turned off. That's all that has changed.
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
In that case, I would definitely assume there was damage to the motherboard or at least the BIOS ROM, and unfortunately since it is too old to be under warranty anymore, you are likely going to need to source a new motherboard if you can find an NOS (New old stock) unit (Because you definitely don't want to source a "used" motherboard that likely has as many miles on it as yours does) or simply upgrade the platform.

This absolutely sounds like a failed board.
 
Reactions: piggiepete
Sep 20, 2020
7
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10
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In that case, I would definitely assume there was damage to the motherboard or at least the BIOS ROM, and unfortunately since it is too old to be under warranty anymore, you are likely going to need to source a new motherboard if you can find an NOS (New old stock) unit (Because you definitely don't want to source a "used" motherboard that likely has as many miles on it as yours does) or simply upgrade the platform.

This absolutely sounds like a failed board.
I appreciate your replies. I've already been component shopping for my next rig anyways, this will just expedite the process!

Do you know how to disable the beep on this mobo in the meantime? I need to use something in the interim and I can't get work done with this beeping, its driving me nuts. I've looked all over for a speaker but I don't even know where that would be!
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
IF it is the system speaker, then something that looks similar to this should be plugged into the motherboard.



But, some systems have an actual regular looking speaker mounted usually towards the front of the case with a longer lead that plugs into the motherboard. If you have nothing like either of those things, then it's possible that the beeping is coming from something else. I can't imagine what else would be capable of beeping but I'm not sure I've ever seen a motherboard with the speaker built into it.
 

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