Question ASUS P8Z77-V PRO LGA 1155 Z77 Not Booting

bioject

Reputable
Oct 2, 2016
71
1
4,545
2
I am trying to sell my old computer but I can no longer get it to boot. If I press the power button, the fans and lights start up for a second and then the entire system shuts off. I have to turn off the power supply first in order to repeat the event. At first I was thinking it was the PSU and so I replaced it with another. Same results. Then I put the original PSU that I had originally moved to my new computer back into the old computer and I'm getting the same result. So now after three PSU's and one verified to be compatible with my motherboard, I am 100% certain it is not the PSU. I also replaced the battery on the motherboard just to make sure it wasn't that either. All hardware inside the PC is the exact same hardware that was inside when the computer was working. The only change is that I removed my GTX 1070 and put that into my new computer and I formatted three SSD's which were previously inside the computer.

I have ensured that I connected the 20+4 pin and the 4x4 pin connectors to the motherboard. The only thing I might have done to damage the motherboard is I accidentally connected a 4 pronged smaller connector to the +5V/Ground/Ground/Speaker connection on the motherboard. This area is normally where you power your case LED's and Power/Reset buttons. So it's probably that when I connected that connector I damaged the functionality there? I have included a link to a picture of the spot and the connector that I accidentally used.

This is the motherboard:
ASUS P8Z77-V PRO LGA 1155 Intel Z77 HDMI SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0 ATX Intel Motherboard

Here is a picture of where I accidentally made a connection and the cable that I used from the EVGA 600BR power supply (this is the power supply I had originally reinstalled in the old computer before replacing it with another and then finally trying my original PSU).
https://ibb.co/HYfs9jg
 

QwerkyPengwen

Splendid
Ambassador
as long as you didn't try to boot it with that connector plugged into those prongs you should have no issues.
If you did try to boot it with that connector plugged into the prongs, then it's possible (not guaranteed) that you shorted something.

time to bread board the system and rule out all the different possibilities.


Bring it down to the absolute basics, and see if you can get it to post to the BIOS.

Single stick of RAM.
Try each slot individually, and each stick individually until you get it to boot.
If that doesn't work I might not be a RAM failure, but something else, so stripping it to the basics helps try to narrow down if it's a dead drive (a dead hard drive connected to power and SATA can cause the system to not boot properly)

So yeah, breadboard, and see if you can get it to boot at all.
 
Reactions: bioject

bioject

Reputable
Oct 2, 2016
71
1
4,545
2
as long as you didn't try to boot it with that connector plugged into those prongs you should have no issues.
If you did try to boot it with that connector plugged into the prongs, then it's possible (not guaranteed) that you shorted something.

time to bread board the system and rule out all the different possibilities.


Bring it down to the absolute basics, and see if you can get it to post to the BIOS.

Single stick of RAM.
Try each slot individually, and each stick individually until you get it to boot.
If that doesn't work I might not be a RAM failure, but something else, so stripping it to the basics helps try to narrow down if it's a dead drive (a dead hard drive connected to power and SATA can cause the system to not boot properly)

So yeah, breadboard, and see if you can get it to boot at all.

Unfortunately I did try to boot it with that connector plugged into those prongs.

After disconnecting all three SSDs and the four sticks of RAM I was able to get the computer to finally boot up. However when I started reconnecting hardware the problem returned. When I removed all SSDs and RAM again I could no longer get the computer to boot up again. I think I've toasted the motherboard. :'(
 

QwerkyPengwen

Splendid
Ambassador
so, it booted without any RAM at all?
You need RAM to boot.
So you need at least one of your sticks.
Also, you don't go plugging everything back in when it looks like it boots.
You do one thing at a time.
Single stick works? good, test all RAM slots.
All RAM slots work? good, try two sticks.
etc. etc.
One single drive connected (preferably boot drive), it boots properly? good, add the next drive.
If you ever encounter an error after you've added a single thing, you can try to narrow down if it's that thing itself, or the port/slot it is being connected into.

It's entirely possible too that everything could be working fine, and what ends up being toast is the front panel board that connects on your case (allows you to press the power and reset button)

If bread boarding works to get booted, then you start adding one thing at a time and testing with each thing to narrow down what might be dead.

Go back to being out of the case (if you put it all back into the case) and do single stick.
Reset the CMOS, and try to boot.

You want to be absolutely sure it's the motherboard and not something much simpler and easier to replace, otherwise you waste a potentially good board and your money.
 

bioject

Reputable
Oct 2, 2016
71
1
4,545
2
so, it booted without any RAM at all?
You need RAM to boot.
So you need at least one of your sticks.
Also, you don't go plugging everything back in when it looks like it boots.
You do one thing at a time.
Single stick works? good, test all RAM slots.
All RAM slots work? good, try two sticks.
etc. etc.
One single drive connected (preferably boot drive), it boots properly? good, add the next drive.
If you ever encounter an error after you've added a single thing, you can try to narrow down if it's that thing itself, or the port/slot it is being connected into.

It's entirely possible too that everything could be working fine, and what ends up being toast is the front panel board that connects on your case (allows you to press the power and reset button)

If bread boarding works to get booted, then you start adding one thing at a time and testing with each thing to narrow down what might be dead.

Go back to being out of the case (if you put it all back into the case) and do single stick.
Reset the CMOS, and try to boot.

You want to be absolutely sure it's the motherboard and not something much simpler and easier to replace, otherwise you waste a potentially good board and your money.
Right now I don't have a boot drive at all. I do have a boot usb. I've since formatted all the drives in preparation to sell the computer. Thanks for the information. I will continue working at it and report back.
 

bioject

Reputable
Oct 2, 2016
71
1
4,545
2
so, it booted without any RAM at all?
You need RAM to boot.
So you need at least one of your sticks.
Also, you don't go plugging everything back in when it looks like it boots.
You do one thing at a time.
Single stick works? good, test all RAM slots.
All RAM slots work? good, try two sticks.
etc. etc.
One single drive connected (preferably boot drive), it boots properly? good, add the next drive.
If you ever encounter an error after you've added a single thing, you can try to narrow down if it's that thing itself, or the port/slot it is being connected into.

It's entirely possible too that everything could be working fine, and what ends up being toast is the front panel board that connects on your case (allows you to press the power and reset button)

If bread boarding works to get booted, then you start adding one thing at a time and testing with each thing to narrow down what might be dead.

Go back to being out of the case (if you put it all back into the case) and do single stick.
Reset the CMOS, and try to boot.

You want to be absolutely sure it's the motherboard and not something much simpler and easier to replace, otherwise you waste a potentially good board and your money.
I've trying resetting the CMOS and tried using the RAM in every single slot individually and have even tried unplugging fans, and I can still not get the computer to stay on. Is it worth removing the CPU or I assume it definitely will not turn on without it? Is there a way to turn on the computer without using the front panel switch?
 
I've trying resetting the CMOS and tried using the RAM in every single slot individually and have even tried unplugging fans, and I can still not get the computer to stay on. Is it worth removing the CPU or I assume it definitely will not turn on without it? Is there a way to turn on the computer without using the front panel switch?
I personally would take the CPU out of the socket and check the pins for damage, but only if I have thermal paste to reapply. If you have been moving the system aorund alot, some of the pins could have shifted out of the correct position from bumping the case. Sometimes reseating the CPU can fix booting issues or ram not working.
 
Reactions: bioject

bioject

Reputable
Oct 2, 2016
71
1
4,545
2
I personally would take the CPU out of the socket and check the pins for damage, but only if I have thermal paste to reapply. If you have been moving the system aorund alot, some of the pins could have shifted out of the correct position from bumping the case. Sometimes reseating the CPU can fix booting issues or ram not working.
I took the CPU out of the socket and inspected it. CPU looks good. Cleaned it and the heatsink and reapplied thermal paste. Getting same results as before.
 

QwerkyPengwen

Splendid
Ambassador
The link I provided for bread boarding explained what you do.
If you've been doing all of this with things still in the case then you haven't been properly bread boarding.
You take a screw driver or something metal and make the two power pins (positive and negative) connect with each other.
Look it up on Google.
 

ASK THE COMMUNITY