Question Asus ROG B450F, Ryzen 2600, Corsair Vegenance 16gb DDR4 that keeps freezing randomly?

Nov 6, 2019
6
0
10
0
I have and system I built with Asus ROG B450F, Ryzen 2600, Corsair Vengeance 16gb DDR4, RTX 2060 that keeps freezing randomly and I wondering if anyone can help? I have had ram go dead on me twice. I thought it was the board after RMAing the ram twice, I sent that in they sent me a new board as they stated the old was unstable. I get the new ram and new MB and reinstall and everything goes fine for a few months. I'm on the latest Bios and such. I have now started having the issue again where the system will randomly freeze. The only way to fix it is to shut the power off at the PSU. This is obviously something I don't want to continue. Has anyone had this issue and if so could tell me how they resolved it? Is it my CPU or Ram or what? At this point, I'm getting close to purchasing another MB and going back intel.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Did you do a clean install of Windows when you built this system, or did you continue to use an existing Windows installation. Please note, a refresh, reset, in place upgrade, upgrade from older Windows version or clone are not the same things as a clean install.

After updating to the latest BIOS version, did you THEN do a hard reset of the BIOS, to reset the hardware tables? If not, I would absolutely try that.


BIOS Hard Reset procedure

Power off the unit, switch the PSU off and unplug the PSU cord from either the wall or the power supply.

Remove the motherboard CMOS battery for five minutes. In some cases it may be necessary to remove the graphics card to access the CMOS battery.

During that five minutes, press the power button on the case for 30 seconds. After the five minutes is up, reinstall the CMOS battery making sure to insert it with the correct side up just as it came out.

If you had to remove the graphics card you can now reinstall it, but remember to reconnect your power cables if there were any attached to it as well as your display cable.

Now, plug the power supply cable back in, switch the PSU back on and power up the system. It should display the POST screen and the options to enter CMOS/BIOS setup. Enter the bios setup program and reconfigure the boot settings for either the Windows boot manager or for legacy systems, the drive your OS is installed on if necessary.

Save settings and exit. If the system will POST and boot then you can move forward from there including going back into the bios and configuring any other custom settings you may need to configure such as Memory XMP profile settings, custom fan profile settings or other specific settings you may have previously had configured that were wiped out by resetting the CMOS.

In some cases it may be necessary when you go into the BIOS after a reset, to load the Optimal default or Default values and then save settings, to actually get the hardware tables to reset in the boot manager.

It is probably also worth mentioning that for anything that might require an attempt to DO a hard reset in the first place, it is a GOOD IDEA to try a different type of display as many systems will not work properly for some reason with displayport configurations. It is worth trying HDMI if you are having no display or lack of visual ability to enter the BIOS, or no signal messages.





If that fails to help, I would create bootable Memtest86 media and test the memory for four FULL passes of all 11 tests.

Memtest86


Go to the Passmark software website and download the USB Memtest86 free version. You can do the optical disk version too if for some reason you cannot use a bootable USB flash drive.

Create bootable media using the downloaded Memtest86 (NOT Memtest86+, that is a different, older version and is outdated). Once you have done that, go into your BIOS and configure the system to boot to the USB drive that contains the Memtest86 USB media or the optical drive if using that option.


Create a bootable USB Flash drive:

1. Download the Windows MemTest86 USB image.

2. Right click on the downloaded file and select the "Extract to Here" option. This places the USB image and imaging tool into the current folder.

3. Run the included imageUSB tool, it should already have the image file selected and you just need to choose which connected USB drive to turn into a bootable drive. Note that this will erase all data on the drive.



No memory should ever fail to pass Memtest86 when it is at the default configuration that the system sets it at when you start out or do a clear CMOS by removing the CMOS battery for five minutes.

Best method for testing memory is to first run four passes of Memtest86, all 11 tests, WITH the memory at the default configuration. This should be done BEFORE setting the memory to the XMP profile settings. The paid version has 13 tests but the free version only has tests 1-10 and test 13. So run full passes of all 11 tests. Be sure to download the latest version of Memtest86. Memtest86+ has not been updated in MANY years. It is NO-WISE as good as regular Memtest86 from Passmark software.

If there are ANY errors, at all, then the memory configuration is not stable. Bumping the DRAM voltage up slightly may resolve that OR you may need to make adjustments to the primary timings. There are very few secondary or tertiary timings that should be altered. I can tell you about those if you are trying to tighten your memory timings.

If you cannot pass Memtest86 with the memory at the XMP configuration settings then I would recommend restoring the memory to the default JEDEC SPD of 1333/2133mhz (Depending on your platform and memory type) with everything left on the auto/default configuration and running Memtest86 over again. If it completes the four full passes without error you can try again with the XMP settings but first try bumping the DRAM voltage up once again by whatever small increment the motherboard will allow you to increase it by. If it passes, great, move on to the Prime95 testing.

If it still fails, try once again bumping the voltage if you are still within the maximum allowable voltage for your memory type and test again. If it still fails, you are likely going to need more advanced help with configuring your primary timings and should return the memory to the default configuration until you can sort it out.

If the memory will not pass Memtest86 for four passes when it IS at the stock default non-XMP configuration, even after a minor bump in voltage, then there is likely something physically wrong with one or more of the memory modules and I'd recommend running Memtest on each individual module, separately, to determine which module is causing the issue. If you find a single module that is faulty you should contact the seller or the memory manufacturer and have them replace the memory as a SET. Memory comes matched for a reason as I made clear earlier and if you let them replace only one module rather than the entire set you are back to using unmatched memory which is an open door for problems with incompatible memory.

Be aware that you SHOULD run Memtest86 to test the memory at the default, non-XMP or custom profile settings BEFORE ever making any changes to the memory configuration so that you will know if the problem is a setting or is a physical problem with the memory.
 
Nov 6, 2019
6
0
10
0
I did a clean install when I first built the system. I did not reinstall windows when I switched out the motherboard. I didn’t do a hard reset on the mb for the new board after updating the bios. I did do this for the old board and it didn’t help. But I will try it.
 
Nov 6, 2019
6
0
10
0
Yes the memory is installed in the 2nd and fourth as the manual states. This is my third set of memory in less than a year. The first two sets one stick died and I had to rma both and finally the board. Thought that fixed the issues as I when I got it back it seemed to run better than previously. But the issues started back up.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Something is causing two sets of memory and a board to go bad. That isn't coincidence and it didn't happen on it's own. One board, one set of RAM, maybe coincidence. Two sets of sticks AND a board, AND still a problem, not likely. Something else is going on.

Are you using a UPS battery backup or a power strip to plug your PC into?

Have you had the outlet you are using tested? You can get a cheap tester that plugs directly into the outlet at any hardware store or home center.

Have you consciously looked at the CPU, specifically to see if there are any bent pins or any problems with the locking mechanism on the CPU socket?
 
Nov 6, 2019
6
0
10
0
CPU locking and pins are good. I am running off a power strip. Could that cause the system to freeze and not require a power switch off to fix? I’ve seen the issue on another thread with similar specs but no one answered the guys question. I could get and ups I’ve been telling myself to get one but haven’t pulled the trigger yet.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

ASK THE COMMUNITY

TRENDING THREADS