[SOLVED] Asus ROG vs TUF Series ?

Jul 16, 2022
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So I'm thinking of getting the Asus ROG Z690 A Gaming WIFI, but was wondering how this motherboard would handling 24/7 use. Wither or not its right to do so, I usually leave my pc on for a few days (leave a few tabs up, maybe a game on, etc) before turning it off. I read that the ROG series are the 'premium' line meant for pushing power for gaming while the TUF series is a cheaper line meant to 'endure'. I wouldn't mind dishing out for the ROG series, as long as I know for sure this thing could hold its own for a bit of punishment without craping on me. I've also had an incident with the TUF Z690 PLUS WIFI where it short circuited and died on me randomly from pulling out a USB flash drive. I'm sure it was a fluke, but not sure if being made of cheaper materials contributed.

I'm sort of looking for opinions on the durability of the ROG line and if TUF models would be a better option (excluding the fact they are cheaper) for long term gaming. Thanks!
 

CompuGuy71

Proper
Jul 20, 2022
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Either will serve your needs. The TUF series is really for those people that move their systems around but honestly as long as you take care of your machine it should be okay. Both boards come from a reliable manufacturer and should serve your needs well. No matter how you are driving your machine.

It comes down to personal preference since both of the boards are Z690 and have WiFi built in. Which one has the aesthetic design you like or other features that you're interested in.
 

CompuGuy71

Proper
Jul 20, 2022
241
63
190
8
Either will serve your needs. The TUF series is really for those people that move their systems around but honestly as long as you take care of your machine it should be okay. Both boards come from a reliable manufacturer and should serve your needs well. No matter how you are driving your machine.

It comes down to personal preference since both of the boards are Z690 and have WiFi built in. Which one has the aesthetic design you like or other features that you're interested in.
 

Why_Me

Champion
So I'm thinking of getting the Asus ROG Z690 A Gaming WIFI, but was wondering how this motherboard would handling 24/7 use. Wither or not its right to do so, I usually leave my pc on for a few days (leave a few tabs up, maybe a game on, etc) before turning it off. I read that the ROG series are the 'premium' line meant for pushing power for gaming while the TUF series is a cheaper line meant to 'endure'. I wouldn't mind dishing out for the ROG series, as long as I know for sure this thing could hold its own for a bit of punishment without craping on me. I've also had an incident with the TUF Z690 PLUS WIFI where it short circuited and died on me randomly from pulling out a USB flash drive. I'm sure it was a fluke, but not sure if being made of cheaper materials contributed.

I'm sort of looking for opinions on the durability of the ROG line and if TUF models would be a better option (excluding the fact they are cheaper) for long term gaming. Thanks!
What cpu do you plan on using?
 
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I'm sort of looking for opinions on the durability of the ROG line and if TUF models would be a better option (excluding the fact they are cheaper) for long term gaming. Thanks!
A while back the cheap Chinese made capacitors were popping regularly and heavy GPU's were ripping out PCIe sockets on Asus' low-mid gaming boards. They came out with the TUF line that featured armored PCIe sockets and Japanese made 10K hour/105C rated capacitors and were a definite step up for that.

I think TUF boards are made with 5K caps (still either Japanese or high-end Chinese) like others in low-mid range and armored PCie slots are pretty common now. TUF is mostly marketing and bling now so it doesn't mean much for extra durability...except for VRM design that's a definite step up from their Prime line. But RoG line's VRM's are a definite step up from TUF.

Armored PCIe sockets help but you still need to remove one of these modern triple-wide, full-length GPU's before moving a PC.
 

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