AT&T Plans To Give Business Customers 400GB Data Speeds In 2017

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James5mith

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Also, 400GB is an amount of data. You need a time element to denote speed. Like 400Gbps, or 400Gb/s.

In technology notation matters.
 

dgingeri

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Either someone is joking or misunderstanding what they're talking about. There is no way they can put out 400Gb ethernet speeds to end users. No. Possible. Way. They couldn't even do this for most business customers.

They might be putting that to their local offices, which would give users much more usable bandwidth, where 4000 customers could maintain their 100Mb connections at full speed. That seems more like what they would be doing.
 

jacklongley

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To start with, the upgrades would occur to the backbone. They stated as much in the 3 phase summary.

I expect that business connections won't have availability at 400Gbps until after 2017. Any availability would be sparse at best, in specific markets likely to have the demand. So probably the biggest carrier hotels first.
 

Blytz

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@Dgingeri you might want to look around, 100 gigabit is already available and 400 gigabit is in dev.

Have a google of terabit ethernet and read around.

Unlikely it'll see copper, but it fibre, certainly
 

somebodyspecial

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The time warner deal should definitely be killed. No way we want that much power in one place. I'd say the same if Apple, Disney etc attempts to buy netflix (rumors of both those floating around). It's bad enough they all own huge stakes in hulu.
 


^^And that is *exactly* why everyone needs to pay attention to what their US House Rep and Senator do about it. Only they and a president can block this. I have contacted mine and asked them to draw up or support a bill that blocks this deal.

Also, it's imperative to pay attention to where the four presidential party candidates stand on the issue: Clinton (D), Trump (R), Stein (G), Johnson (L). The very idea that the vast majority of people in America are not happy with their cable/ISP provider who themselves are already merger conglomerates shows it will only get worse if not stopped.
 

bit_user

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It's one thing to have 100 GbE inside a datacenter, and another thing, entirely, to have it offered by an ISP.
 

ravikumar17jan

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400 Gb/s= 50 GB/s for home user?
The fastest PCI-e SSD from Samsung or intel are capable of writing at around 3 GB/s and they are not cheap.
Networking hardware(s) is also another bottleneck.
 

bit_user

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Nobody is saying that.

Given how long it's taking for 10 gigabit to become mainstream for LAN applications, I think we can say that 400 gigabit Internet is multiple decades away, for most of us.

...maybe never. I can't even see a reason why a home user would need this kind of bandwidth. You really have to get into the realm of sci fi.

Now, for businesses, if they want to move all their fileservers and databases into the cloud and have their employees doing HD video conferencing with others around the world, then I could see why a building like Google HQ might need hundreds of Gb/sec of bandwidth.

Also, financial businesses might want excess bandwidth as a way of reducing latency. Probably the links connecting different stock & commodity exchanges are many Gb/sec.

BTW, Intel is integrating 100 Gb/sec OmniPath into some of its new datacenter-oriented CPUs. They've already announced that the next gen will jump to 200 Gb/sec. So, we'd be halfway there, in the near future. But this kinda misses the point, as the purpose of these connections isn't to link two computers, but rather to connect to the uplink port of a switch aggregating a building (or more) full of computers.
 
400Gb/s is currently possible with ganging four 100Gb/s fiber connections or ten 40Gb/s fiber connections. It'd be expensive to wire such internet connections, but I imagine any building that needs such a connection can afford it.
 

jasonkaler

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400GbE is a standard, not a measurement.
It specifies 400 gigabits per second i.e.
"single-mode fiber (400GBASE-LR8) using eight parallel wavelengths (CWDM) each at 50 Gbit/s"
 

jasonkaler

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or one 400GBASE-LR8 fiber connection.
 

zodiacfml

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Nice post. It is nice to get updated on the latest fiber news. I never thought it would be possible to simply add or remove a wavelength of light to a fiber.

I thought I will not see Cisco as a member of OPENROADM.
 

AngeleJR

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Sorry for my question, but would this mean 400 Gbps?
I currently have 200 Mbps and I would upgrade to this first chance I get lol.
 
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