Question At what TBW% is wise to change the SSD

ditrate

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If left the errors and the bad blocks aside, at what percentage of TBW is better to change the SSD drive? 60%?
 

USAFRet

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If left the errors and the bad blocks aside, at what percentage of TBW is better to change the SSD drive? 60%?
You replace it when it dies, or becomes 'slow', or otherwise unusable.

In the interim, however, be prepared for it to die at any moment.

I had exactly that happen.
A SanDisk SATA III SSD.
3 years old, nowhere near the TBW number.
Seemingly perfect. Died pretty much instantly, as I turned the system on.

Drive replaced under warranty, 100% of the data recovered from my backup.


And even getting to 1/2 the rated TBW number is normal consumer use is unlikely.
 

ditrate

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You replace it when it dies, or becomes 'slow', or otherwise unusable.

In the interim, however, be prepared for it to die at any moment.

I had exactly that happen.
A SanDisk SATA III SSD.
3 years old, nowhere near the TBW number.
Seemingly perfect. Died pretty much instantly, as I turned the system on.

Drive replaced under warranty, 100% of the data recovered from my backup.


And even getting to 1/2 the rated TBW number is normal consumer use is unlikely.
So, if it's like 10tb of 70TB (vendor's TBW), it's fine?
 

USAFRet

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So, if it's like 10tb of 70TB (vendor's TBW), it's fine?
Yes.

And used long enough, that drive might see 700TBW.
Or might die at 10.01TBW....

Tha TBW number is really only for the warranty.
Much like the age component. You would expect it to fall over dead at 3 years + 1 day.

(although my drive did die at 3 yeaars, 33 days, just outside the warranty period)
 

geofelt

Titan
Run your ssd until you run out of writes or until update performance deteriorates. Look at the space used; 90% might be the point to upgrade.
OTOH, if you are not doing much writing, you could go higher.

When all the nand blocks can not longer do updates, what you have is still readable, allowing you to copy all to a new drive.
But, windows is always updating so if there were truly no updates available, you would have to do the copy on a different system.
 

ditrate

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Run your ssd until you run out of writes or until update performance deteriorates. Look at the space used; 90% might be the point to upgrade.
OTOH, if you are not doing much writing, you could go higher.

When all the nand blocks can not longer do updates, what you have is still readable, allowing you to copy all to a new drive.
But, windows is always updating so if there were truly no updates available, you would have to do the copy on a different system.
"Look at the space used; 90% might be the point to upgrade. ". - You mean when I used 90% percent of TBW, with 10% left?
 

USAFRet

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"Look at the space used; 90% might be the point to upgrade. ". - You mean when I used 90% percent of TBW, with 10% left?
Capacity, not TBW.

An SSD needs some free space to operate efficiently.

If you're currently using 90% of the space on the drive, you might consider upgrading to a larger drive.
Or offloading some data off to something else.
 

Inthrutheoutdoor

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Do yourself a favor, and set aside the time to clean up your drives before and on the same schedule as when you are making your 2-4 back ups...

Just get rid of all the cached junk/internet crap/installer files etc etc left over from everyday use on a regular basis, and move less frequently used stuff to a large storage drive, then you won't ever really be worried too much about capacity, just sayin :)
 

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