ATI 4850 back from the dead!

brett1042002

Distinguished
Jun 17, 2009
565
0
19,010
So, I rebuilt my old PC today. It had been sitting, in pieces, in my closet for the past 6 months. Athlon X2 5400+, ATI 4850 512mb, 500gb HDD, 4gb RAM. Threw it all together, booted it up and got those evil POST Beeps :(. 1 long, 2 short.... video card failure. I tried several things... clearing CMOS, checking connections, power, reseating, etc etc... it was dead. I was so bummed. So, I started reading up on people sticking their failed mobos and video cards in their home ovens and then miraculously working. I thought what the hell, it's dead anyways... it cant hurt. So I stripped the card of the heatsink/fan... put the card on a cookie sheet at 375 degrees for 8 minutes.... took it out and let it cool off.... popped it back in my PC...booted it up... and the damn thing works fine now! No beeps, POSTs fine, have a normal display!

Anyone else had this work for them?

 
Solution
The old oven trick crude but it works and is fairly common for riving G80 cards. All it does is partly melt the solder joints and sealing any microfisures is the solder. The pros use what is known as a reflow oven to do the same trick.

soundefx

Distinguished
Jan 17, 2008
661
0
19,010
Wait a minute.. you baked your card at 375 degrees?
I have heard of card being able to handle high temps before, but damn.

If this is true, you have one hell of a card and you will never have to worry about it failing because of over heating.
 

jamesgoddard

Distinguished
Nov 12, 2005
1,105
0
19,290
Likely the card wasn't seated right the first time or you didn't have the power connected properly.

The oven trick is a known fix if you have dry joints... And I guess 375 is in Fahrenheit, so 'only' 190 dec C...

soundefx - no this is not a working temp and a GPU running at this temp will certainly fail, as what's happening is the solder bump attaching the chip will have melted, hopefully (and it looks like the case here) re connecting the GPU to the PCB
 
The old oven trick crude but it works and is fairly common for riving G80 cards. All it does is partly melt the solder joints and sealing any microfisures is the solder. The pros use what is known as a reflow oven to do the same trick.
 
Solution

brett1042002

Distinguished
Jun 17, 2009
565
0
19,010
Likely the card wasn't seated right the first time or you didn't have the power connected properly.


I re-seated the card 4 times.... in 2 different 16x PCI-e slots on the Asus mobo... and reseated the power connection the same amount of times. The card was getting power... the red light on the video card flashed 2 times on boot and lit up in sync with the beeps during the POST. I spent about an hour troubleshooting it, before deciding to pop it in the oven. It was dead at that time.